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Is there a spot in the Appalachian Mountains that is warm enough to grow healthy palms? Does anyone grow palms there or even seen them there? More specifically in the southern states like South Carolina and Georgia. 

PalmTreeDude

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Needle Palms grow in Northern and Central Alabama, so probably at least in the foothills of the Appalachians.

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone (2012): 9b | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (1985, 1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a | 30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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@PalmTreeDude, sounds like an interesting experiment.

I suspect that if you could find a sheltered spot, you might be able to coax a trachycarpus wagnerianus to grow there.

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18 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Is there a spot in the Appalachian Mountains that is warm enough to grow healthy palms? Does anyone grow palms there or even seen them there? More specifically in the southern states like South Carolina and Georgia. 

Some counties in GA, SC in the Appalachians are usda hardiness zones 7b and 8a, alongside tiny areas in the NC Appalachians being these zones, so it is most likely to grow hardy palms like Trachycarpus fortunei or Sabal palmetto in these areas, and it would definitely be possible to Rhapidophylum hystrix or Sabal minor in those Appalachain counties. Also, depending on the map, Sabal minor might actually be native to the extreme Southern Appalachains in GA.

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I used to live outside Asheville when I was a teen (zone 7) I had a large hurricane cut Palmetto brought up to my grandmas house with the help of my dad. The palm thrived for three years with only a sheet overhead during the coldest of nights.  When I moved to Myrtle beach my relatives back home in the mountains informed me it had been cut down by the new owners. 

Edited by Brad Mondel

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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16 hours ago, Brad Mondel said:

I used to live outside Asheville when I was a teen (zone 7) I had a large hurricane cut Palmetto brought up to my grandmas house with the help of my dad. The palm thrived for three years with only a sheet overhead during the coldest of nights.  When I moved to Myrtle beach my relatives back home in the mountains informed me it had been cut down by the new owners. 

Why would they do that?! :rant: I would love a Sabal palmetto. 

PalmTreeDude

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