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Kopsia singapuriensis


Jdiaz31089

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I'm curious to know if any of you California growers have tried kopsia species here? There doesn't seem to be much information about them online. Do they take cold well? Frost perhaps? Or are they too tender for us to grow here? 

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While I can't give a definitive answer ( perhaps Len, or Ken [ Fastfeat] might chime in with thoughts/ personal experiences trialing  that specific species, or, other Kopsia out there) Some  K.  arborea seedlings I started last year haven't flinched through the winter here.

While sitting on one of my benches under the back patio,  I haven't provided any extra heat to everything id positioned there all winter. The last couple days included, we've had a few  mornings in the mid/low 30s thus far and my guess is it might only be a couple extra degrees warmer under cover compared to the actual air temp. out in the yard.  

My thought regarding this set up is, if whatever I'm trialing turns out to be super sensitive, it will show damage, esp. seedlings which are less than a year old, on un-heated benches that stay shaded pretty much all day this time of year. 

I'd say, if you have an opportunity which wouldn't set you back much, if the plant doesn't make it, give it a shot.

I never expected the same seedlings to have survived being forgotten about in a box/ germinating in a pill bottle for 3 months after the move, let alone surviving one of the hottest summers we've had.  Regardless of a good start, it will be a couple more years before I'll have a more complete idea on how they're do here. Cool story though:greenthumb:

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That's good to hear! I started kopsia singapuriensis over winter and they've been in a community pot outdoors. We've had several nights with low and mid 30s, and so far the seedlings seem unfazed. I'm hoping these will turn out to be good growers here.

2 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

While I can't give a definitive answer ( perhaps Len, or Ken [ Fastfeat] might chime in with thoughts/ personal experiences trialing  that specific species, or, other Kopsia out there) Some  K.  arborea seedlings I started last year haven't flinched through the winter here.

While sitting on one of my benches under the back patio,  I haven't provided any extra heat to everything id positioned there all winter. The last couple days included, we've had a few  mornings in the mid/low 30s thus far and my guess is it might only be a couple extra degrees warmer under cover compared to the actual air temp. out in the yard.  

My thought regarding this set up is, if whatever I'm trialing turns out to be super sensitive, it will show damage, esp. seedlings which are less than a year old, on un-heated benches that stay shaded pretty much all day this time of year. 

I'd say, if you have an opportunity which wouldn't set you back much, if the plant doesn't make it, give it a shot.

I never expected the same seedlings to have survived being forgotten about in a box/ germinating in a pill bottle for 3 months after the move, let alone surviving one of the hottest summers we've had.  Regardless of a good start, it will be a couple more years before I'll have a more complete idea on how they're do here. Cool story though:greenthumb:

 

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Good question, and a good time for me to brush up on Kopsia, Cerbera and Ochrosia, as I don't see many of any of these genera growing side-by-side.

Fullerton Arboretum has two or three plants of what is listed as Cerbera manghas (or as they list it: "C. mangus"). It's been awhile since I've seen them, but they've never skipped a beat with either frost or drought. I just can't recall if they're correctly ID'ed. They're rather bulky shrubs, prob 6' tall x 12' wide last I saw; no signs of tree-like habit. I believe flowers were similar to online images but I need to look again.

LA Arboretum has several shrubs near Tallac Knoll of probably two different species of either/both Kopsia and/or Ochrosia. I saw them blooming, saw fruits, even looked at labels, but I forget which genus they were. For some reason, I thought Kopsia pruniformis was one of them; I know that K. fruticosa is not (too cold here). (Ideally, all three genera growing together would greatly help me in differentiating them, but...) Will probably be out there this week or maybe next to prune some trees; will make an effort to get IDs when there.

I'm just guessing, but I'd suspect that the hardiness of the common species in all three genera are probably similar. I was quite surprised to see (likely) Cerbera manghas thrive with ease in OC. OTOH, it certainly won't be a small tree here (as it is generally known as in tropics/humid subtropics). I'm sure that all would be happier in Miami than LA, but I don't think they're as cold-sensitive as Stemmadenia or Alstonia.

 

Edited by fastfeat
spacing
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SoCal and SoFla; zone varies by location.

'Home is where the heart suitcase is'...

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"If, as they say, there truly is no rest for the wicked, how can the Devil's workshop be filled with idle hands?"

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On 1/29/2017, 11:29:39, fastfeat said:

Good question, and a good time for me to brush up on Kopsia, Cerbera and Ochrosia, as I don't see many of any of these genera growing side-by-side.

Fullerton Arboretum has two or three plants of what is listed as Cerbera manghas (or as they list it: "C. mangus"). It's been awhile since I've seen them, but they've never skipped a beat with either frost or drought. I just can't recall if they're correctly ID'ed. They're rather bulky shrubs, prob 6' tall x 12' wide last I saw; no signs of tree-like habit. I believe flowers were similar to online images but I need to look again.

LA Arboretum has several shrubs near Tallac Knoll of probably two different species of either/both Kopsia and/or Ochrosia. I saw them blooming, saw fruits, even looked at labels, but I forget which genus they were. For some reason, I thought Kopsia pruniformis was one of them; I know that K. fruticosa is not (too cold here). (Ideally, all three genera growing together would greatly help me in differentiating them, but...) Will probably be out there this week or maybe next to prune some trees; will make an effort to get IDs when there.

I'm just guessing, but I'd suspect that the hardiness of the common species in all three genera are probably similar. I was quite surprised to see (likely) Cerbera manghas thrive with ease in OC. OTOH, it certainly won't be a small tree here (as it is generally known as in tropics/humid subtropics). I'm sure that all would be happier in Miami than LA, but I don't think they're as cold-sensitive as Stemmadenia or Alstonia.

 

Hmm, good observations. Here is a picture of my seedlings. I have around 10 seeds sprouting and they have all been outdoors for the entire duration of our winter. We had several nights with temperatures in the low 30s and had at least 3 nights with frost. Of course, this neither proves or disproves k. singapuriensis' hardiness, but it looks promising. 

20170131_124248.thumb.jpg.71be403d85213b

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  • 2 weeks later...

Crap, I just noticed that you're in Fresno. I would unequivocally state that you're going to be too cold to grow any of these species in the ground. No way, but would make fine tub plants that revel in summer heat. Just cut water back and wheel into house or garage for winter. Treat like you would a pygmy date or banana there.

RE seeds/seedlings-- they need more consistent warmth than adults. I'd strongly recommend bringing these inside and putting in a sunny window (and pulling back from cold glass at night). They're at high risk of rotting at soil temps in 30s, 40s, even 50s. Warm 60s will result in much faster growth.

FWIW, saw Kopsia officinalis (two plants) at Arcadia yesterday. Didn't see others in a quick run thru the area. Maybe more?

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SoCal and SoFla; zone varies by location.

'Home is where the heart suitcase is'...

_____

"If, as they say, there truly is no rest for the wicked, how can the Devil's workshop be filled with idle hands?"

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On 2/9/2017, 8:13:05, fastfeat said:

Crap, I just noticed that you're in Fresno. I would unequivocally state that you're going to be too cold to grow any of these species in the ground. No way, but would make fine tub plants that revel in summer heat. Just cut water back and wheel into house or garage for winter. Treat like you would a pygmy date or banana there.

RE seeds/seedlings-- they need more consistent warmth than adults. I'd strongly recommend bringing these inside and putting in a sunny window (and pulling back from cold glass at night). They're at high risk of rotting at soil temps in 30s, 40s, even 50s. Warm 60s will result in much faster growth.

FWIW, saw Kopsia officinalis (two plants) at Arcadia yesterday. Didn't see others in a quick run thru the area. Maybe more?

Haha yeah I'm a little further north. I am mostly concerned with the cool, wet conditions. This is what plumeria struggle with  here, although if they're planted underneath the eaves of a house where they stay a bit drier, they make it through our winters with just leaf drop. Pygmy dates and bananas do great here. In fact, bananas go to bloom and fruit every year, they just don't ripen the fruit before winter gets them. Some people are able to get mature fruit on their bananas, perhaps with proper fertilization and water. There's a house near mine that gets large bunches ripe around October every year. 

The container with the kopsia seedlings i covered with a thick, clear plastic to increase temperatures during the day -acting like a mini-greenhouse. And i thought rot might be an issue as well so I used very little organic matter in the soil mix and used perlite, sand and crushed granite instead. It's what i use for plumeria and they seem to like it. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

More seeds are coming up through the soil, I'd say they might have a decent chance here. These were outdoors through our entire winter and even saw temperatures in the low 30s several times. 

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20170220_172142.thumb.jpg.790956c4f22948

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  • 1 month later...

Seedlings are going strong, seems like the danger of cold is past and they grew right through it. 

20170405_173054.thumb.jpg.ff5af7b1514ef6

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

We're getting into the 90s pretty consistently now.  These seedlings seem to love it. 

20170503_122904.thumb.jpg.4f45aa61bed532

20170503_122927.thumb.jpg.756faccf6ce48b

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  • 1 year later...

Here is my remaining kopsia. I lost the others when i left for a week and forgot to turn the irrigation on. Greenhouse grown up to this point.

20180920_124516.jpg

Edited by Josue Diaz
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38 minutes ago, Josue Diaz said:

Here is my remaining kopsia. I lost the others when i left for a week and forgot to turn the irrigation on. Greenhouse grown up to this point.

20180920_124516.jpg

:greenthumb: ..Was just about to ask how yours were coming along.. Looks good. 

Updated picts. of the K. arborea seedlings ( roughly 2yrs old, post- germination): Thinking it is about time to step up the bigger of the two. Might do both since the pot the smaller one is in is starting to fall apart.  

Kept outside in my Shade Alley all year except a couple nights last winter when it was forecast to drop below 30F. I wait until they start weeping a little before watering. 

Both seedlings,  same age.. not sure why the one on the right stayed smaller but its catching up.
DSCN4461.JPG.52e798f2428ec42f9e1bc9c222d


Bigger of the two, started branching in June. Plant in the white washed root maker on the left is Randia aculeata, White Indigo Berry.
DSCN4463.JPG.1e92f0138f21c477c355d9d40b2


Smaller of the two.. It'll catch up..
DSCN4464.JPG.d1b1bed4fc4ab1254c0aa802faf

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Very nice Nathan! Those look like 5-gal containers. Well-grown too. How easy do you suppose these are to propagate via stem cuttings? Given how long it takes for seed-grown plants to mature...

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4 minutes ago, Josue Diaz said:

Very nice Nathan! Those look like 5-gal containers. Well-grown too. How easy do you suppose these are to propagate via stem cuttings? Given how long it takes for seed-grown plants to mature...

Not sure on propagation by cuttings.. Assume it might be similar to Stemmadenia ( Milky Way Tree) or Crape / Pinwheel Jasmine ( Tabernaemontana)? I'm sure others who have  had more experience w/ propagating both would have better insight. All info i have seen online suggests cuttings would be do-able.  Certainly planning on trying some in the future for sure though.  

Thinking the larger plant should be close to  ( if not attempting to..) setting its first flowers within another year or two, esp. if i get it repotted. Basing that thought upon how quickly it has grown thus far. Can't imagine it would take another 4+ years to see flowers but i could certainly be wrong.. 

Both are actually in 1gals currently. Been more concerned w/ getting them bigger before stepping into 3 or 5gal pots. 

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  • 5 years later...
On 9/20/2018 at 10:58 PM, Josue Diaz said:

Here is my remaining kopsia. I lost the others when i left for a week and forgot to turn the irrigation on. Greenhouse grown up to this point.

20180920_124516.jpg

updates??

previously known as ego

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