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Eucalyptus niphophila


philinsydney

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This is the treeline in the Snowy Mountains of NSW at 1870m. The alpine area can be seen beyond this last line of trees.

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Philip Wright

Sydney southern suburbs

Frost-free within 20 km of coast

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I know this is a stretch or tropical-looking plants, but have a look at the trunks.

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Philip Wright

Sydney southern suburbs

Frost-free within 20 km of coast

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Some more pics, with signage from the ski runs in the area.

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Philip Wright

Sydney southern suburbs

Frost-free within 20 km of coast

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Some final pics

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Philip Wright

Sydney southern suburbs

Frost-free within 20 km of coast

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I am actually growing niphophila here in Cincinnati as a perennial. Any top growth that does survive the winter will just be icing on the cake. It is a seedling from the Nungar Plain (frost hollow), a very cold provenance, and it should do well here as a perennial.

Cincinnati, Ohio USA & Mindo, Ecuador

 

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I found another couple of pics

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Philip Wright

Sydney southern suburbs

Frost-free within 20 km of coast

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Palmy, they are called Snow Gums because they are the only eucs to grow right up to the alpine zone. I believe they have some sort of anti-freeze in their sap.

I've been reading the Hardy Eucalypt page on the Internet; apparently they are not adaptable to temps much below -20c, so they are difficult to grow in the US midwest and prairie states. In fact, there are other highland eucs from Australia that have shown more adaptability to American cold.

Philip Wright

Sydney southern suburbs

Frost-free within 20 km of coast

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They are pretty much a zone 7 plant with some provenance selections a bit hardier, but not by much. Also I do believe that another problem many cold-hardy eucs have here in the Eastern U.S. is rot from the cold and wet winters and consistently hot temperatures during the summers which can also stress out plants from higher elevations.

I am using it as a perennial so mine will stay more shrublike year after year.

Cincinnati, Ohio USA & Mindo, Ecuador

 

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