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Anyone Have Information on Trachycarpus Princeps?


Scot from SC

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Does anyone have information about Trachycarpus princeps?

I have heard various temperature thresholds for this palm, and I am assuming that they are prone to spear pull when young like fortuneis.

I have fortuneis, waggies, and one takil so far in my Trachycarpus collection and wanted to expand.

Thank you in advance my palm tree friends.

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I have one, its a pretty slow grower and has a few problems with leaves dying early in my area.

-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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Hmmm...I am an 8a zone, so I wonder if my winter temperatures would kill it? Are they as hardy as fortunei?

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No clue, sorry!

-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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Scott, there pretty hardy for me, just a little tender than fortunei when young. But should be ok in 8a. They like to be on the dryer side since all the ones in dry shade for me look perfect. I think its still a pretty new palm that the real cold tolerance has not been tested yet. Try one and see what happens thats all you can do for now. LOL!

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Thank you my friends. I will try one in a spot with good drainage and overhead canopy.

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Have had one here in the ground in North Florida for a few years. Slow grower. No problems to speak of from either the heat or the cold.

Jason

Gainesville, Florida

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Mine (3) just went through first winter here..... 21 low on one occasion..... no spear pulls and no real problems. Planted in dappled shade, seam to do better in my sandy soil than fortuni

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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I have seedlings and am very anxious to plant several in the next few years in a cold 8b.

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The silvery spotting on the leaves I believe is from the 90' loblolly pine that it is planted under and is probably some form of powdery mildew. It doesn't appear to affect the plants, other than spot the old leaves up. I'll probably hit it with some fungicide in the next few weeks to clean it up. Seranoa and Cabbage palms in natural pine flatwoods are always covered with this stuff. Seems especially bad this spring, probably because of the wet winter we experienced.

The silver under the leaves is part of the plant.

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Jason

Gainesville, Florida

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This palm does not like water on the leaves are in the growth point...

The leaf damage is probably from moisture/cold or possibly sap from

the pine that turns to mold over time.

These are less hardy than Fortunei and need the spear kept dry as

well as the base when small-nice to see yours pulled through!

I baby mine more than any other palm but I was late covering

(after it snowed)and mine had some moisture in the crown,so

it got a little spear damage but does not appear ready to pull.

I think the only time to water these like other Trachys is when the temps

are 80-95F,they seem to take the heat better than some Trachys

until temps approach or exceed 100F.

Picture of mine yesterday.

000_0002_zpsgynld3fj.jpg

Edited by Jimhardy
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Princeps' native habitat is very well drained. It requires well drained soil and enjoys an alkaline ph because It grows on limestone rock in the drier mountains of yunnan province in China.

  • Upvote 1

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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Thank you all for the valuable information. I find your insights about how palms fare in your yards much more insightful than just a zone designation. I appreciate all of the comments and information. By the way, the pictures are fantastic and helped me visualize the palm better than a stock photograph on a website.

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They grow them even here in The Netherlands and Belgium. And there is a faster growing hybrid available here also. That hybrid should be a nice coldhardy palm for the US I guess.

Alexander

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I have had one for a number of years up in my Natchez, Mississippi garden (9a). It is in a shady spot (probably too shady), started as basically a seedling or 4in size, and is still relatively small. I never have paid much attention to it, no fertilizer or much irrigation for that matter. It has thrived but it is just a slow, steady grower. Pretty with its unique coloration. Certainly hardier than things like T. oreophilus which I lost two or three times (then gave up), and some of the other less hardy species like T. martianus and its various forms, as they do get leaf-damage at about 20F. But T. princeps has always held up well. I think it is now three times that it has been subjected to 2-3 continuous days of sub-freezing temps with a low of about 18F. Garry Tsen at coldplant in China can give you all the information you might need to know about this species (and its forms) and cultivation requirements, if he happens to see this thread and comment. He is always very helpful on this forum.

Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 287 ft | z10a | avg Jan 43/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899); previously Los Angeles, California (multiple locations)

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Mine keeps having the older leaves die prematurely. They start turning yellow at the outer edges and it rapidly progresses inwards. It only keeps about 2-3 good leaves at a time (but is slowly getting larger). Im not sure why this is happening. I just buried some pieces of concrete around it to try to alkalize the soil just in case that is the cause.

-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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  • 5 months later...

Anyone know how they do in full sun?

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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Anyone know how they do in full sun?

Dave, I have a small seedling that continues to survive in full sun with lots of water in a sandy, well-drained spot. Its biggest challenge is to survive when my old dog step on it.....and yet a new leaf has emerged. I'll be redoing this area at the end of September and take a photo at that point. It has been in its current spot over 6 months now, taking severe abuse.......

John Case

Brentwood CA

Owner and curator of Hana Keu Garden

USDA Zone 9b more or less, Sunset Zone 14 in winter 9 in summer

"Its always exciting the first time you save the world. Its a real thrill!"

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Good!

To

Know

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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Beautiful palm Jim! You must be so proud. How old is your Princeps now?

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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Thanks

When I think of giving up doing all this every year

the Princeps and the T.ferns always are the exception.....

I would guess that Princeps is going on 8 years?

They are a little slow in pots but increase in size

and growth speed every year.

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That age looks about right - fairly consistent with the 7-year old potted specimen I picked up last weekend (separate thread on this.)

Ben Rogers

On the border of Concord & Clayton in the East Bay hills - Elev 387 ft 37.95 °N, 121.94 °W

My back yard weather station: http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/hdfForecast?query=37.954%2C-121.945&sp=KCACONCO37

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I have about 50 1g princeps. I am going to sacrifice one of them this winter to test their 8b (hopefully 9a) survivability.

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One of mine die a few years ago as a one gallon size. It was in the open and the low was 12F for three nights. The other two are in a more protected spot and had no damage and they are drier in those areas since they have overhead canopy. Over head canopy is important for this palm if you have very wet winter and cold temps. So far the remaining two have never show’n any damage, even the tips are perfect, haven’t given them any winter protection either. When they start trunking and are more exposed that will be the real test for me.

I think this palm will be super good for dry hot climates, in full sun or shade. Much better than fortunei for those places.

Edited by Palm crazy
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That age looks about right - fairly consistent with the 7-year old potted specimen I picked up last weekend (separate thread on this.)

I saw that post,that is a real nice palm.

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  • 4 years later...
  • 2 years later...

I have had one for 5 years and it's not doing well. I am thinking it's in full sun and it would do better in less sun. I'm going to dig it up and put it in a pot for a while. I'll see if I can post a picture.

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22 minutes ago, DianeMC said:

I have had one for 5 years and it's not doing well. I am thinking it's in full sun and it would do better in less sun. I'm going to dig it up and put it in a pot for a while. I'll see if I can post a picture.

I doubt its the full sun, mine are in the hottest spots in my yard.  They seem to be able to handle more sun and drought than other Trachycarpus.  One of the best Trachycarpus for California.

Are you watering it enough?

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Curious where the poster is. But they do seem to handle Sun pretty well. Around here Trachycarpus is full Sun often don’t look very good. Afternoon shade seems to do them well. 
 

 

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2016 was the last year I had the palm....it was spectacular but when photo bucket went

from 2.99 to 39.99 a month I said no thanks so no pics of it the following year....I was pretty angry 

with myself for not saving it at he time....I did dig it up last minute but didn't get hardly any good roots

and by mid winter in a pot inside it pulled and that was that- I have started over at a new place.

 

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I put two princeps in full sun a year ago.  In that time they have only gotten one new frond each and they are both a light green/yellow color.  If they don't look better after this season I'm going to move them to get some shade.

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I've read that they are as hardy as Fotunei , and I've read that they aren't as hardy , and I've read that the their hardiness isn't known because they are new to  being in cultivation and their hardiness isn't known yet   ? Mine has seen 4F and 5F without issues but it is in a great microclimate  . It's just starting to trunk . 

Will

Mine should get huge this year . I hope it's a female because it is next to a male Nainital .

51944693130_91f5a86976_b.jpg

 

Edited by Will Simpson
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Mine has been unprotected down to 10°F.  It has gotten hardier with age and hasn't lost any fronds this yr.  I did dig a massive hole ( 4x4x4' ) and fill with good garden soil and grit for drainage. 

20211104_112840.jpg

20220311_165609.jpg

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21 hours ago, Will Simpson said:

...

Mine should get huge this year . I hope it's a female because it is next to a male Nainital .

 

 

That would be a great looking hybrid.  I'm sure you'd have a waiting list of guys wanting to buy seed, myself included. 

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heres a small T.Princeps x T.Wagnerianus....they are gorgeous and in

my opinion(experience) they have for sure lived up to all the expectations of what this cross could bring.

 

 

SAM_2057.JPG

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