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Livinstona chinensis


Palm crazy

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The most common mistake people make with the Chinese cabbage palm is to grow it in full sun.

They need plenty of shade to grow well and look good. Besides, the leaves are definitely not hardy to 15F even if the plant itself survives. So you need to grow it under canopy where you live. You will have much better luck and you probably won't loose the original stretched leaves either.

You are right. My shade grown Livistona chinensis has larger fans and longer petioles and doesn´t burn with every freeze. so they look a lot better!

Carambeí, 2nd tableland of the State Paraná , south Brazil.

Alt:1030m. Native palms: Queen, B. eriospatha, B. microspadix, Allagoptera leucocalyx , A.campestris, Geonoma schottiana, Trithrinax acanthocoma. Subtr. climate, some frosty nights. No dry season. August: driest month. Rain:1700mm

 

I am seeking for cold hardy palms!

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  • 1 month later...

Here I go again with more L. chinensis, this is actually fun to make more palms out of indoor palms.

Here the newest one.

DSC00003_zps1fe42b9f.jpg

The roots are very small and over stuff into one pot. Horrible I tell yea.

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Separated them into single palms here the four largest of the lot. Some of the feeder roots didn’t make it.

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And the smallest.

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I made two singles with the two largest ones.

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And the rest I made triple palms.

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Four new palms out of one overcrowed pot for $30 bucks, Love it. These will go into the garden next spring.

Edited by Palm crazy
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  • 3 months later...

Excellent, my neighbor is now asking me to design his backyard which has almost the same dimensions as my yard. I am thinking about using several triple L. chinese as an integral part of their yard. As far as cold hardy fan palms go, it is hard to beat for a tropical look. They sell large landscape sized ones cheap in the springtime at the box stores. May need to wait till then. I concur that they look heaps better in the shade. Sun grown ones here look sun burn't most of the time. Probably will use a P. sylvestris as a focal point and a few L. decora's along with some small mules. Round out with some loquat's and citrus.

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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Tremendously underrated palm, and just because it is common.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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He likes R. excelsa ........so that will be a nice understory palm to put around as well.

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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  • 4 weeks later...

Here my Livistona Chinensis is growing in partial shade under some tall pines. They do really well without any frost damage whatsoever. I think they do better in marginal climates with a canopy because last night it dipped down to a record 19 degrees. They sailed through without a problem. My washingtonia however, are fried.

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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I usually get some damage on leaf tips at around 25F here but cold spell here last longer than your place.

16F damage was protected with blanket. Center growth sill very good.

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This older one same thing.

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They’ll grow back a lot faster for you in S.C. than my location.

My washy is not looking to good but still very alive.

dfa03128-c2d0-4702-afd4-ca7990ea5722_zps

Edited by Palm crazy
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I usually get some damage on leaf tips at around 25F here but cold spell here last longer than your place.

16F damage was protected with blanket. Center growth sill very good.

DSC00039_zps1be4a5df.jpg

This older one same thing.

DSC00020_zpsfa0c136f.jpg

They’ll grow back a lot faster for you in S.C. than my location.

My washy is not looking to good but still very alive.

dfa03128-c2d0-4702-afd4-ca7990ea5722_zps

How can you say "usually" when you just planted these? Yours look greenhouse stretched, you won't know how they perform until you've had them in the ground for a few years and they've grown fronds in the microclimate they're in.

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I usually get some damage on leaf tips at around 25F here but cold spell here last longer than your place.

16F damage was protected with blanket. Center growth sill very good.

How can you say "usually" when you just planted these? Yours look greenhouse stretched, you won't know how they perform until you've had them in the ground for a few years and they've grown fronds in the microclimate they're in.

Axel good question, I am going by pass experience when I had one 10 years ago and it live 6 years when we had all those warmer winter in a row.

The second one has been in the ground three years and the others were planted last summer and are not like you say, actumated to my weather.

But in the pass I alway saw tip damage at 25F without protection.

Edited by Palm crazy
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I checked on mine today and it's essentially the same now as it was back in the summer, I'll try to get some pics to share.

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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Question: Does anyone have a pic of mature L.chinensis planted together in a large clump? Like the ones you get at the box store but not separated. I planted mine like this because I was too chicken to try and tear apart the rootball. I am now wondering if this will look weird once they are bigger or if it will pass as a natural look. There's about 8 of them in the clump I have.

Tyler

Coastal Zone 9a

''Karma is a good girl, she just treats you exactly how you treat her"

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Ok I found a picture of a unseparated clump of L chinensis Mike in St. Pete posted from someone's garden a few years back. Nice hedge look when it's that size.

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Tyler

Coastal Zone 9a

''Karma is a good girl, she just treats you exactly how you treat her"

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Ok I found a picture of a unseparated clump of L chinensis Mike in St. Pete posted from someone's garden a few years back. Nice hedge look when it's that size.

Nice pic! I kind of like that look. Reminds me of a Bamboo clump somewhat and can be used for privacy. Plus it has it's own little micro climate going on.

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  • 6 months later...

Probably a bit faster in the sun....but looks much better in the shade ..... slow

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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Why not protect it over the winter months?? I've had a couple in the ground that I over winter here in NEBRASKA.

Yes, in my case the fronds die back but palm itself comes back each spring and I've done very minimal protection even coming off the coldest Winter here in 30 years last winter. This year will protect it more. I know it will never grow into a palm TREE, but just the fact that that it comes back show just how tough this palm is.

I had another one that was planted in the ground in more of a shady area and I thought it died until I dug it up and noticed it still had green at the very bottom. So, knowing just how much they love water I put the root ball in a plastic grow pot and put pot in stream to a pond I made and it's come back nicely. The more water they get, (and sun) the better they grow.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi I'm brand new to this group, I live in Ontario and keep my palms inside throughout our winter's as none could withstand the temperature's here, Anyway I have just added two pots of L.Chinensis to my collection, They are in clumps of 5 in each pot and I intend to try and separate them into their own pots this weekend, What I'm concerned with is how sensitive are the roots when I try to untangle them, I will obviously take great care, But am concerned about shocking, and possibly killing them.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, Also any tips on ideal soil mixes and fertilizer? And does anyone in the northern area's use artificial light over the winter? These will be container palms, So they can be moved inside and out with the seasons here...

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  • 6 years later...

How long do these stay in their seedling stage? How long does germination take? Are they faster than palmettos?

Palms - 3 S. romanzoffiana, 1 W. bifurcata, 4 W. robusta, 1 R. rivularis, 1 B. odorata, 1 B. nobilis, 2 S. palmetto, 1 A. merillii, 2 P. sylvestris, 1 BxJ, 1 BxJxBxS, 2 BxS, 1 C. nucifera, 1 P. roebelenii, 1 H. lagenicaulis, 1 H. verschaffeltii, 9 T. fortunei, 1 C. humilis, 2 C. macrocarpa

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