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MKIVRYAN

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Large ponciana's still at the capitol and around S.Phoenix / Tempe.Royal palms resort had to cut theirs back to 8 ft trunks a few years back due to freeze but I imagine they are getting big again.

Aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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Hey guys, I am looking for some non-palm seed/tree ids. Here are the seeds I collected today in Phoenix.

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Here is the Oak. I see Southern Live Oaks is popular here, but this does not look like the Quercus virginiana as I know it. It is another variety that is local, or just looks different under these conditions. Sorry about the horrible picture.

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This is the tree from which I collected the elongated seeds in the center.

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And this is the tree from which the small pea looking seeds on the far right came from.

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And again, sorry for the picture quality.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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Your pics are a bit rough but I would guess the first is a mesquite tree, then an olive tree, and the last one is a eucalyptus tree.

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Thanks for the feedback. Yeah, sneaking this stuff in to work assignments is rough, lol. Gotta take what you can get.

So, I am guessing I don't need a pic of the tree to ID these on the left.

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And yes, the seeds on the right are palm seeds.

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In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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The first image is what's commonly referred to here as the Russian black olive. The second image is a typical olive. The third is a eucalypt, I think, or perhaps a pittosporum.

Gene

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Thanks for the feedback. Yeah, sneaking this stuff in to work assignments is rough, lol. Gotta take what you can get.

So, I am guessing I don't need a pic of the tree to ID these on the left.

attachicon.gifIMG_3562.JPG

And yes, the seeds on the right are palm seeds.

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The palms are P. dactyliferia. The seeds don't look mature. Those would probably grow for you, provided you gave them good drainage. I germinated some from a pack of supermarket dates.

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Lets try this again. Cham Plumosa. Been flowering for the past month or so. Seems pretty bullet proof so far.post-5684-0-44421900-1422851087_thumb.jppost-5684-0-80699200-1422851103_thumb.jp

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The flame thrower just opened a new leaf. Not as dark as normal maybe due to the cold. These seem to be a decent choice here. All 3 of mine are just slow and steady.

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The flame thrower just opened a new leaf. Not as dark as normal maybe due to the cold. These seem to be a decent choice here. All 3 of mine are just slow and steady.

attachicon.gifpalm1.JPG

Cool! I have a small (very small) one in a pot but I didn't think you could put them in the ground here. How much protection did you have to give it in the cold? I thought they were suspect below 40 degrees...

Then again, I've read that ti plants will die under 50 degrees. Mine slowed down slightly while we were in the cold snap and resumed blooming as soon as it warmed up.

I guess the morale of the story is, don't believe everything you read. :)

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Chambeys suspect under 40? They can take high-20s, easy...mine didn't blink at 30 degrees this year.

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Ben Rogers

On the border of Concord & Clayton in the East Bay hills - Elev 387 ft 37.95 °N, 121.94 °W

My back yard weather station: http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/hdfForecast?query=37.954%2C-121.945&sp=KCACONCO37

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I have had 3 flame throwers for about 18 months now. As mentioned they have been slow but steady. About an inch every 2 months in winter and about 1.5" per month in summer. 1 was planted as a 5 g and the other 2 as 15g. All are in heavy shade. I would say they get an hour or 2 of direct early AM sun then heavy filtered to full shade the rest of the day. Two of them are under a lemon tree which I plan to thin out this spring to allow more sun in. We will see what this does to them. As far as cold protection I just covered them over New Years when we had our 28-29 degrees for a few nights. A few weeks earlier when we had a few nights right at 32 I did not even cover. I see no signs of any damage.

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I took this photo of a palm in my neighborhood on Sunday when we had all that fog.

rod

N phx

IMG_2216.JPG

Hey Rod,

Can I get dibs on seeds from your Borassus if it ever sets, or if you come across seeds elsewhere?

Are you able to get a pic of it in its entirity, with something to show scale? I love these, and would be interested in the history of yours -

Where did you happen to get your seed/plant. I hear that these are very delicate when young?

'edit' - Just read you need a pollinator -

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I was wondering if anyone is using worm castings in their soil mixtures? Are you satisfied with results? Are they beneficial, harmful or what 'the hey it couldn't hurt' category? :) I'm thinking 1 part to 3 parts of my mix, any thoughts? Of particular interest to me, does it increase or decrease soil ph?

Thanks

Steve

Peoria AZ

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i've never tried worm castings. I have used that Alaskan Fish Fertilizer and it seems to do well. I find worms in the soil occasionally crawling around. Once a year I throw some soil sulfur down and that seems to green up my queen palms. I say this cause about four years ago i tried it for the first time, and the following two years I did not. When I looked back at some pics taken during that time frame of when I threw down the S.S. the palms were greener looking. So last year I began the S. S. regimen and did it again not too long ago. Only down side from what i have read is that it can kill some of the beneficial bacteria in the soil. Thats where the fish fert comes to play. I think it helps with the soil chemistry. Not entirely sure, i'm not a scientist. But I say give it a go.

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Thanks for the feedback. Yeah, sneaking this stuff in to work assignments is rough, lol. Gotta take what you can get.

So, I am guessing I don't need a pic of the tree to ID these on the left.

attachicon.gifIMG_3562.JPG

And yes, the seeds on the right are palm seeds.

attachicon.gifIMG_3559.JPG

The palms are P. dactyliferia. The seeds don't look mature. Those would probably grow for you, provided you gave them good drainage. I germinated some from a pack of supermarket dates.

I have a bunch of little dacts germinating just like you, from store bought dates, but getting them from somewhere I visit makes them a bit more special. And yes, they are the early dropped fruit, the big clusters were still hanging on tight up there. And interestingly, some creature was very adept at getting the seeds out of them and leaving the fruit intact almost intact just getting into the tail end enough. So, these seeds and the others are just for the fun of it. If at the end of it, if I wind up with something growing in the yard where I can say "I got that from a business trip to Phoenix" it is all for the better.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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I was wondering if anyone is using worm castings in their soil mixtures? Are you satisfied with results? Are they beneficial, harmful or what 'the hey it couldn't hurt' category? :) I'm thinking 1 part to 3 parts of my mix, any thoughts? Of particular interest to me, does it increase or decrease soil ph?

Thanks

We use Happy Frog Soil Conditioner when planting and as a mulch a few times throughout the year. Worm castings is one of the ingredients. It also has humic acid, which does slightly reduce the PH of the soil. However, I doubt much would have a lasting affect here as watering with our hard, alkaline water would offset any benefit in the long term.

Worm castings by itself wouldn't really reduce soil PH as it's not an acid, IMO.

I do use worm castings in my plumeria and hibiscus. It keeps the white flies away like nothing else I've ever found and the plants seem to like it.

Edited by SueH_AZ
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I was wondering if anyone is using worm castings in their soil mixtures? Are you satisfied with results? Are they beneficial, harmful or what 'the hey it couldn't hurt' category? :) I'm thinking 1 part to 3 parts of my mix, any thoughts? Of particular interest to me, does it increase or decrease soil ph?

Thanks

We use Happy Frog Soil Conditioner when planting and as a mulch a few times throughout the year. Worm castings is one of the ingredients. It also has humic acid, which does slightly reduce the PH of the soil. However, I doubt much would have a lasting affect here as watering with our hard, alkaline water would offset any benefit in the long term.

Worm castings by itself wouldn't really reduce soil PH as it's not an acid, IMO.

I do use worm castings in my plumeria and hibiscus. It keeps the white flies away like nothing else I've ever found and the plants seem to like it.

Thank you. Found a locate source for casting. As long as it doesn't increase the PH, that was my main concern. Rod has advised me to lower my ph to 7. His is at 6.5. Still in the design stage as far calibrating & delivering the correct amount of ACV with H2O. Currently creating a portable filter system for the front and back yard. Will post pics when completed. When last I visited him, he spoke of unsuccessful attempts to grow a genus(sorry I don't remember which one-way too many distractions @ his place) :) . Once he setup his filtering system(removal of chlorine, + minerals) he was able to.

Steve

Peoria AZ

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I'm going to try and been better about sharing pictures. Today I will do a few Chamaedoreas. The best ones I have found for AZ are Radicalis, tepejilote, and plumosa, but most of the ones I have tried are doing well also. Just need plently of shade.

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A few more. Anyone else want to share?

Cham Tepjolte and my other flame thrower from a few months ago.

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How long of you had that king Palm in the ground? I have a triple planting, however it's not in the ground. In a container doing fair. I'll take some pics too! However you take the cake MKivryan for uncommons. I only have the common ish palms.

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I think a few others have me beat by a lot with uncommon stuff. They just dont post pictures :) I have 2 kings that have been in the ground for about 12 months now. I have lost 5-6 others over last summer including 2 15G triples. These have been a very tough keep for me. A bunch of the other uncommons have been easier. I just keep trying the kings as they are so cheap at HD in CA.

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Brahea Brandegeei

I've had this for a few years, and its slow to grow, planted extremely root bound, but starting to kick up speed. Looks like a miniature washy palm with cool colored fronds.

post-6564-0-23282400-1423854150_thumb.jp

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Chinese fan Palm is growing on North side of fence next to a queen. Its growing fast now, and is taller than the 6ft block fence. I call this my pritchardia look a like.

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Double Bizzy cranking this winter. Seems to grow faster in winter time than summer. Maybe due to lack of sufficient watering in summer time. Its hard to see in this pic, but there are two plants here that were bought this way. Would be cool if one leans. Going to be massive someday. The trunk diameter is fairly large.

post-6564-0-85899000-1423854547_thumb.jp

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Cool Croton surviving its second winter. Grows pretty slow and gets mostly shade in summer with sun in the morning. No signs of winter damage and was covered.

Dypsis L. gets morning sun in winter, and good amount of shade starting in the afternoon. Showing some signs of winter cold, but not bad.

King Palm from a HD in Los Angeles. Full shade in summer under patio. Definitely shows heat stress with brown tipping of fronds. However, its growing fairly decent now in part sun. Shade is from a large queen palm.

Last pic is a really cool Philodendron. Mostly filtered shade. I did throw some cover on it this winter, however the first three nights of freezing i was out of town, so nothing was covered until the fourth night in my back yard.

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Red Ti is the best looking and growing Ti plant in back yard. Survived its second winter. I have others namely the red sister ti with the hot pink leaves. They are growing well, but not as cool as the red ti leaf and its large form. The red sister ti leaf plant has some spotting of leaves and not nearly as full looking.

Pothos vines growing good. Second winter in ground. I did not protect these guys. They have sufficient over head protection under pigmy palms.

Third pic just a random shot with some Armata palms. No irrigation on these guys, I just shoot them with the hose on those hot days. They do get some over spray from sprinklers.

Last pic of my three plus year old cocos. I've had them outside for the last month since the lows got into the upper 40s at night. Basicly they were only inside this year for about 2.5 months taking them outside when the temps were warmer and back in at night. Glad those days hauling in and out are done.

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My Fried bananas, raja puri

Royal Palm I did a very bad job protecting it. I didn't give it over head protection, but did put some xmas lights around the growing point. Its about 50% burned. I'm sure with lots of water, it will repair itself with excellent new growth.

Same goes with Triangle, I just put lights around it. It is also about 50% damaged. Triangle is a slow growing palm for me. I think its on its third year and late summer seemed to pick up speed when the weather cooled off at night. Could also be a water issue as it does not get a whole lot of water.

Last pic is my Sabal blackburniana. This thing grows very fast. And always looks good.

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Thanks for the feedback. Yeah, sneaking this stuff in to work assignments is rough, lol. Gotta take what you can get.

So, I am guessing I don't need a pic of the tree to ID these on the left.

attachicon.gifIMG_3562.JPG

And yes, the seeds on the right are palm seeds.

attachicon.gifIMG_3559.JPG

The palms are P. dactyliferia. The seeds don't look mature. Those would probably grow for you, provided you gave them good drainage. I germinated some from a pack of supermarket dates.

I have a bunch of little dacts germinating just like you, from store bought dates, but getting them from somewhere I visit makes them a bit more special. And yes, they are the early dropped fruit, the big clusters were still hanging on tight up there. And interestingly, some creature was very adept at getting the seeds out of them and leaving the fruit intact almost intact just getting into the tail end enough. So, these seeds and the others are just for the fun of it. If at the end of it, if I wind up with something growing in the yard where I can say "I got that from a business trip to Phoenix" it is all for the better.

LOL, you were right. Finally got around to planting, well attempting to plant the dact seeds. Not a one of those fruit had a seed in it. They were all seedless aborted fruit.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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It might just be that your dates were never pollinated, remember that there is no pollinator for dates here, wind will pollinate some, otherwise it has to be done by hand. I know that dates that are not pollinated will not produce viable seed, perhaps they don't produce a regular seed at all?

Corpus Christi, TX, near salt water, zone 9b/10a! Except when it isn't and everything gets nuked.

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One of the best rare palms I have found for the Arizona desert is a slow grower, but seems to handle the conditions and still look pretty good.It is my favorite species,and I have a dozen or so planted out around my yard.(Pseudophoenix sargentii)

aztropic
Mesa,Arizona

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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An even slower grower is Pseudophoenix ekmanii.Seems to prefer some shade;other than that,it's trouble free.Just very,very,glacially SLOW!

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

post-236-0-97602700-1423879656_thumb.jpg

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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Another rare species that is a no brainer for the desert is Copernicia.Here's a shot of my 2 largest.(berteroana left and macroglossa,right)

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

post-236-0-24880600-1423880053_thumb.jpg

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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