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bubba
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Ike is looking like one mean Cat.That nasty eyewall is eery.The Spagetti is all pointing to South Florida.Can you say 140 MPH!

I am not boarding up yet.Grandad always said the Bad ones that hit here(Cape Verde's) always hit Puerto Rico.Ike is far higher than Puerto Rico.

Reading Weather Updates on Hurricanes is like reading Razzmotazz.You know.The sociopathy of the Abernathy...Just hope Ike does not hit PR and does a David on us and our Palms.

What you look for is what is looking

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I hope Ike doesn't hit anyone. I think that's wishful thinking.

The hurricanes have been coming in quick succession, much like planes landing at Heathrow airport. :(

Tyrone

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Ike is making me sick to my stomach. I had a bad feeling once that guy formed and was named. It is following the same path as Andrew did in 1992. Small, tight, and fierce. I swore to myself that I would never stay for another as powerful.

Rick Leitner

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

26.07N/80.15W

Zone 10B

Average Annual Low 67 F

Average Annual High 84 F

Average Annual Rainfall 62"

 

Riverfront exposure, 1 mile from Atlantic Ocean

Part time in the western mountains of North Carolina

Gratefully, the best of both worlds!

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I will be boarding up, packing up, and hauling my horses out of here if it looks like it will be a Cat 4 making landfall in Palm Beach County.

Palmmermaid

Kitty Philips

West Palm Beach, FL

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It's really got to be perfect conditions for a storm that far away to continue with it's ferocity all the way to Florida... I'll get nervous when it's 3 days out... No use in sensationalism, unless I want to be a news reporter! :lol:

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Sometimes, ah, many times, I feel that this is NOT the place to be living.

I can remember as a kid, we had NO storms to speak of for years and years.

I think we can name about 15 or so just in the last 10 that swiped, hit, or came damned close to SE Fl.

Rick Leitner

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

26.07N/80.15W

Zone 10B

Average Annual Low 67 F

Average Annual High 84 F

Average Annual Rainfall 62"

 

Riverfront exposure, 1 mile from Atlantic Ocean

Part time in the western mountains of North Carolina

Gratefully, the best of both worlds!

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At times like this I am glad that I sold my house in Fort Lauderdale. One less thing to worry about. My kids are there though, so I do worry about them. I hope that Ike takes a turn somewhere and misses, but it does look pretty menacing.

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

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I have this sinking feeling that my house and garden as I know it, is about to permanently change.

Rick Leitner

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

26.07N/80.15W

Zone 10B

Average Annual Low 67 F

Average Annual High 84 F

Average Annual Rainfall 62"

 

Riverfront exposure, 1 mile from Atlantic Ocean

Part time in the western mountains of North Carolina

Gratefully, the best of both worlds!

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I have this sinking feeling that my house and garden as I know it, is about to permanently change.

Although there is always a first time for everything, this historical map of storms seems to indicate that no other storms in recorded history that have been similar to Ike have hit SE Florida.

at200809_climo.gif

Larry 

Palm Harbor, FL 10a / Ft Myers, FL 10b

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I guess... that is the problem with tropical storm/cyclone/hurricane... you never know where they end up. Just prepare for the worst and hope for the best. You know why you live there... and I know why I live here, you have hurricane and I have cyclone, because you wouldn't live anywhere else. Unfortunately it is a fact of live, and hopefully you will rise through it the other end with minimal damage....

Regards, Ari :)

Ari & Scott

Darwin, NT, Australia

-12°32'53" 131°10'20"

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I have this sinking feeling that my house and garden as I know it, is about to permanently change.

Rick,

I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you and Bubba (and everyone else). Don't get too focused on the current track. Alot could change over the next couple of days. The best scenario is for it to recurve into the atlantic before "kissing" the southeast coast.

Jason

Gainesville, Florida

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New track is putting Ike on the west coast of Florida. Keeping it over open water in what appears to be a low shear environment. Not a good thing!

Jason

Gainesville, Florida

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I gotta take some "before" photos :badday:

"If you need me, I'll be outside" -Randy Wiesner Palm Beach County, Florida Zone 10Bish

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The thing is that none of us want this to harm ANYONE or any trees, plants, or animals. Everyone always says, "just as long as it's not us" but in reality, it harms everyone in the big picture of things.

Rick Leitner

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

26.07N/80.15W

Zone 10B

Average Annual Low 67 F

Average Annual High 84 F

Average Annual Rainfall 62"

 

Riverfront exposure, 1 mile from Atlantic Ocean

Part time in the western mountains of North Carolina

Gratefully, the best of both worlds!

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Hi all,

All i can say is crap! not again its starting to look like Charlie back in 2004. When I saw the forecast track this afternoon this is getting more crazy by the minute track keeps changing hopefully

this storm will move out to sea but again things can change just hope everyone stays safe from Ike

Matthew Albach

Pinellas Park FLorida

USDA zone 10a

sunset zone 26

heat zone   10

mostly frost free most years.

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Well, it a little crap down here too now. We still have over approx. 100,000 people without power, including my Mom and this is already starting to look to much like Gustav with Ike projected to enter the central Gulf. We are in recovery and prep stage now at the same time. That reminds me too much of 2005. Gustav and Katrina/Rita are some memories I don't want to have either.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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I think Ike means business. If it hits Cuba head on it will lose some of it's strength before getting into the gulf. If it scrapes the top end of Cuba it won't diminish at all and will enter the gulf in a rage. It doesn't look good guys. My thoughts are with everyone in the area.

Best regards

Tyrone

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Starting to feel really eery around here already as we prepare for round 2. The air all around the area is thick with smoke as folks are trying to burn the debris from Gustav as there is no time for debris removal and this stuff can too easily become flying missiles.

Current power outages in Louisiana as of this morning are 290,861. There are 14,000 people working on power lines alone.

One thing unique about this storm was the number of large feeder lines that went down along with all of the local damage.

post-1207-1220802273_thumb.jpg

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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Starting to feel really eery around here already as we prepare for round 2. The air all around the area is thick with smoke as folks are trying to burn the debris from Gustav as there is no time for debris removal and this stuff can too easily become flying missiles.

Current power outages in Louisiana as of this morning are 290,861. There are 14,000 people working on power lines alone.

One thing unique about this storm was the number of large feeder lines that went down along with all of the local damage.

post-1207-1220802273_thumb.jpg

I wouldn't be so quick on round 2. It might spare LA and head to the western gulf.

Coastal San Diego, California

Z10b

Dry summer subtropical/Mediterranean

warm summer/mild winter

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The eye is soon expected to cross the coast of Cuba. It's down to cat 3 now. Cuba should diminish it a bit. Maybe it will fall apart and not reform. I feel sorry for those in Cuba at the moment.

Tyrone

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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I saw video of waves crashing through city streets in Cuba! Man, that Caribbean Basin takes a beating every year! Keith looks safe this time, as it looks like it's Texas's turn :rage:

"If you need me, I'll be outside" -Randy Wiesner Palm Beach County, Florida Zone 10Bish

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I must admit to feeling a little better. And I worry for Texas. Right now it looks like a Corpus Christi storm, but in the end it could be down in Tad's territory. The worst part is that we still have two more months of hurricane season. But we'll pray for a non-eventful end to the season so that we can turn our attention back to palms.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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I'm with you, Keith. It has been a bad season so far. Haiti is in really bad shape. And now Cuba is as well. I read "Isaac's Storm" about the big one that took out Galveston in 1900 (I think). Scary.

Palmmermaid

Kitty Philips

West Palm Beach, FL

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Keith

It looks like Corpus right now, but every forecast shows it ticking a little further north

toward me. I'm making precious little plans on Thu/Fri so I have time to board windows.

Even if it's a little south, we'll get the "bad" side. Only a few hundred miles from you,

on the "good" side of Gustav, I didn't get a drop of rain believe it or not.

Steve

USDA Zone 9a/b, AHS Heat Zone 9, Sunset Zone 28

49'/14m above sea level, 25mi/40km to Galveston Bay

Long-term average rainfall 47.84"/1215mm

Near-term (7yr) average rainfall 55.44"/1410mm

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Keith

It looks like Corpus right now, but every forecast shows it ticking a little further north

toward me. I'm making precious little plans on Thu/Fri so I have time to board windows.

Even if it's a little south, we'll get the "bad" side. Only a few hundred miles from you,

on the "good" side of Gustav, I didn't get a drop of rain believe it or not.

Steve

For those not in the know, hurricanes have a bad side (east) and a better side (west). For instance in Gustav, we got the eye, but Baton Rouge which was 60 miles to our east got the bad side. Our winds topped out at 78mph, while Baton Rouge on the outer band of the bad side got 91 mph winds. We got a whooping, but Baton Rouge got plain tore up. Still well over 100K people without power, mostly in the Baton Rouge area as I write this.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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Keith

I'm sure you and I and most people born and raised on the Gulf think about historical storms in the

day or two you have to wait out the storm once you know it's headed in your direction. For my area

of Texas, the storm I grew up hearing about was "Carla". Until "Katrina", for NOLA it was probably

"Betsy". For Mississippi, "Camille". I'm, sure there are numerous ones from Florida's distant (and

recent) past depending on where you live in the state. Bubba has talked about a few of those.

I rode through the very eye of "Alicia" in Houston on my 21st birthday in 1983. It's pretty wild to see

80' tall trees bent over at a 30 degree angle for seemingly hours on end and then to experience the

eerie green light and calm of the eye with absolutely no sound, no bird, no insect, nothing. 15 minutes

later the same trees are being whipped over at the opposite 30 degree angle. Bizarre.

But according to old timers, "Alicia weren't no Carla!"

The granddaddy of them all has to be the 1900 Galveston storm, however. I ran across this website

run by folks who still commemorate that storm as the worst natural disaster in terms of loss of life in

US history. If you go to the website: http://www.1900storm.com/ what is particularly interesting for

me is to look at probably the first documentary footage of a natural disaster ever. Scroll down to

"film clips" and watch. The site claims there were only four movie cameras in existence when these

films were made. Galveston was called the "Wall Street of the South" in the 19th century, but it never

recovered from this storm. The majority of it's masonry buildings were leveled by the storm surge -

it is interesting to note surviving wood structures in the films. I've seen other still photos, though that

make the whole island look like a giant, scattered lumber yard.

An interesting sidelight is that even after 1900 Galveston remained the no. 2 US immigration port

behind New York - all my people landed at Galveston in the 1800's.

Steve

USDA Zone 9a/b, AHS Heat Zone 9, Sunset Zone 28

49'/14m above sea level, 25mi/40km to Galveston Bay

Long-term average rainfall 47.84"/1215mm

Near-term (7yr) average rainfall 55.44"/1410mm

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Galveston is a great spot.One of my Dad's best friends lived in Houston and they had a place in Galveston,which my parents went to numerous times and greatly enjoyed.

You guys are not kidding about the bad right hand side of Hurricanes.As an immediate example,we got a very strong blow over here almost as bad as the West Coast in Fay.

We all are praying that Ike weakens and hits where the least amount of damage can be sustained.You guys are veterans and know the drill.It is not always the worst case scenario.

What you look for is what is looking

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Steve,

You might enjoy reading "Isaac's Storm" by Erik Larsen about the Galveston hurricane. Isaac Monroe Cline was the weatherman in Galveston at the time. The Cuban forecasters had it right but no one in the States listened.

A train was bringing tourists to Galveston when the storm struck. They never found the train. Scary.

Palmmermaid

Kitty Philips

West Palm Beach, FL

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Kitty

I have read the book. How amazing that there was like one trained Meteorologist in the

whole State back then, and what a thankless job to try and warn everyone at the last

minute! If you like Erik Larson, try The Devil in the White City, another true story of the

Chicago 1893 Columbian Exposition. I guarantee, you will not be able to put it down.

If you ever get to Galveston, there's a museum that commemorates the storm - I think

it's around Pier 19 or Pier 21. Having the photos blown up wall size and all the exhibits

give it a mini Holocaust Museum type of feel. It's definitely worth seeing.

Steve

USDA Zone 9a/b, AHS Heat Zone 9, Sunset Zone 28

49'/14m above sea level, 25mi/40km to Galveston Bay

Long-term average rainfall 47.84"/1215mm

Near-term (7yr) average rainfall 55.44"/1410mm

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Ike looks like a Rita repeat.

Linda

San Antonio, TX

29.50N 98 W Elev: 950 ft

Zone 8b/9a (Half my zip code 8, other half 9) Heat Zone 10

Currently, all my palms are hardy to 8b.

լինդա կարամանիան մալդոնադո

(My name: Armenian)

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Ike looks like a Rita repeat.

You can't imagine how often I have heard that today. This is indeed very similar to Rita. Everyone thought the storm was heading to Houston and then wham, Southwest Louisiana got leveled. And that is no exaggeration. One small town had 1 building left standing. I pray this is not a repeat.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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Keith

Although I wish this were Rita, I still think it's more like Alicia or the 1915 Galveston storm.

And, although the wind speeds and pressures aren't so impressive just yet, Ike is still half

the size of the Gulf:

post-193-1221190477_thumb.jpg

Alicia formed as a Tropical Depression on the edge of a once-in-a-lifetime cool front that

made it through Texas in August and stalled somewhere in the Gulf south of New Orleans.

It backed up and within 30 hours hit Galveston/Houston as a Cat 3 with 115mph sustained

winds and 135mph gusts. It all happened so fast, no one could have evacuated even if we

knew what we were doing back in 1983.

I know the town you're talking about: the LA beach town. If I could find the before/after

Rita pics that were circulating a few years ago, I'd post them. It's very humbling.

Say a prayer for your friends in Texas tonight. For those of you who didn't know, "Tejas"

means friend.

Steve

USDA Zone 9a/b, AHS Heat Zone 9, Sunset Zone 28

49'/14m above sea level, 25mi/40km to Galveston Bay

Long-term average rainfall 47.84"/1215mm

Near-term (7yr) average rainfall 55.44"/1410mm

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God Bless all those that may be affected by this storm. The NHC is saying because of Ike's size, it will create a Cat 4 or 5 storm surge. Thankfully, Galveston has a very tall surge wall. At the very least, this may minimize the flooding situation.

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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Ray

I'm afraid the seawall won't protect Galveston this time. The wall is around 15' tall, but they're predicting

a storm surge in the bay (opposite side from the seawall) of over 20', plus wave action. 95% of the island

is less than 10' elevation. They're predicting that the whole island will be inundated. The west end (not

protected by the seawall) is already flooded with landfall still 16-18 hours away.

Steve

USDA Zone 9a/b, AHS Heat Zone 9, Sunset Zone 28

49'/14m above sea level, 25mi/40km to Galveston Bay

Long-term average rainfall 47.84"/1215mm

Near-term (7yr) average rainfall 55.44"/1410mm

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We are already getting 15ph gust from the North and it's just starting We have quite an extensive palm collection and I a just hoping we don't loose any of them. I'm particularly worried about our Bizmark, Triangle and Foxtail being able to handle the winds.

No one in our area has even bothered to board or tape windows, including us. Most everyone iin my neighborhood is ready to ride the storm out. I have been through most of the Houston hurricanes and even Andrew when I lived in Miami. Lots of people here who have never experienced a hurricane are in for a wild 36 hours.

Winds are are 105 right now but the pressure has dropped slightly. It is a CAT 2 right now but could possibly change. They are predicting 75 - 100 mph winds for my neighborhood.

Houston, Texas

29.8649°N - 95.6521°W

Elevation 114.8 ft

Sunset zone 28

USDA zone 9a

Average maximum high temperature 93.60 F

Average maximum low temperature 45.20 F

The annual average precipitation is 53.34 Inches

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