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Coconut Growing Farthest From Equator

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Paranormal

okey

 

Edited by Paranormal

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James West
On 18 December 2007 12:56:06 am, Palmateer said:

Some have claimed the Newport Beach Coconut might be the farthest north in the ground with sustained growth, at around 33 degrees, 37 minutes latitude.

 

Please submit any other farthest from equator claims - be sure to include exact latitude position, north or south.

Malay dwarf coconut palm currently growing at 33 degrees, 52 minutes south of the equator in the Sydney Botanical gardens.

Sydney coconut palm.jpg

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XYZ

While optimism is usually good, this seems a rather loose use of the term, “growing”. 

What is it here with the cult of coconut torture? Such a handsome and useful tree...shame to see them mangled in temperate climates.

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James West
1 hour ago, stone jaguar said:

While optimism is usually good, this seems a rather loose use of the term, “growing”. 

What is it here with the cult of coconut torture? Such a handsome and useful tree...shame to see them mangled in temperate climates.

Well, it is growing. I couldn't think of another word to describe what it's doing.

 

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PalmatierMeg
8 minutes ago, James West said:

Well, it is growing. I couldn't think of another word to describe what it's doing.

 

Suffering?

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Xenon

Isn't this a little bit misleading? I recall someone saying they were originally growing in a greenhouse and only planted out fairly recently. 

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XYZ

“Dying or dead” seem better descriptions of the trio depicted. I realize it’s summer down south, but if this is what they look like with warm temps and long days, l’d have the tree chipper lined up for winter. Heroic efforts, as always, can be implemented to keep them looking like Cat 5 hurricane victims for at least another season.

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Anamurlu
13 hours ago, James West said:

Malay dwarf coconut palm currently growing at 33 degrees, 52 minutes south of the equator in the Sydney Botanical gardens.

Sydney coconut palm.jpg

Australia is a continent with very strange weather conditions. The middle east and Europe are not like the mediterranean conditions.

I think the most sensitive part of the coconut tree is the root. Secondary, meristems and leaves, leaves are more resistant to cold weather.

It is difficult to describe strange climate, hard hurricanes or difficult conditions in Australia. It seems that the problem is not in its roots; as if the leaves were battered...

It's a difficult plant, it's a secret, but it's waiting to be solved. The problem of this tree usually comes from the roots. If the average temperature is 17 - 18 ° C during the winter months, it can survive. The rainy cool long-term winter months create mushrooms in their roots.

To protect roots, roots can be a precautionary measure of salt fungus formation. Of course salt does not like other plants if it spreads to the soil.

For example, Florida miami, hard winter and snow were seen, meristems and leaves were saved from slight damage; very few deaths.

Sometimes there are differences in climatic conditions apparently, I think the change of soil may be important. The situation is not only climate conditions, but other elements...

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James West
9 hours ago, stone jaguar said:

“Dying or dead” seem better descriptions of the trio depicted. I realize it’s summer down south, but if this is what they look like with warm temps and long days, l’d have the tree chipper lined up for winter. Heroic efforts, as always, can be implemented to keep them looking like Cat 5 hurricane victims for at least another season.

You might be right. The fours palms were planted as mature trees in May [of all times] just before our winter last year [2017]. The winter killed one, two look pretty crook. But the large one has grown two new leaves since last October. They all looked dead in late September, so we'll see what happens next winter. Interesting experiment.

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James West
17 hours ago, Xenon said:

Isn't this a little bit misleading? I recall someone saying they were originally growing in a greenhouse and only planted out fairly recently. 

No intention to mislead. They were planted last May, just before winter. Worst time to plant. I thought they were dead last September, but the large one in the photo kicked back in, and has grown two new leaves so far. At least by next winter it will be firmly rooted and accustomed to its site, which it certainly was not last winter.

There had been an earlier one growing nearby, about four feet high, into its third winter. But the Garden's management cleared its semi-canopy away in the middle of July 2016, and that put paid to it.

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James West
7 hours ago, Anamurlu said:

Australia is a continent with very strange weather conditions. The middle east and Europe are not like the mediterranean conditions.

I think the most sensitive part of the coconut tree is the root. Secondary, meristems and leaves, leaves are more resistant to cold weather.

It is difficult to describe strange climate, hard hurricanes or difficult conditions in Australia. It seems that the problem is not in its roots; as if the leaves were battered...

It's a difficult plant, it's a secret, but it's waiting to be solved. The problem of this tree usually comes from the roots. If the average temperature is 17 - 18 ° C during the winter months, it can survive. The rainy cool long-term winter months create mushrooms in their roots.

To protect roots, roots can be a precautionary measure of salt fungus formation. Of course salt does not like other plants if it spreads to the soil.

For example, Florida miami, hard winter and snow were seen, meristems and leaves were saved from slight damage; very few deaths.

Sometimes there are differences in climatic conditions apparently, I think the change of soil may be important. The situation is not only climate conditions, but other elements...

Sydney's winter average maximum last winter [2017] was 19.2 c. The coldest overnight was 8c. Serious winter winds would be a problem, but we usually don't get them here. I'll know a lot more come September. Thanks for your comments.

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Tyrone

The Sydney BG ones are doomed. 

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James West
17 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

The Sydney BG ones are doomed. 

You're probably right.

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kingdom67

Sydney's climate is very close to the madeira funchal climate.

 

Also;
I traveled to many countries, i made holiday on the beaches. Although it is very humid there is a very different and pleasant nature in (south)Turkey. If I'm not mistaken i saw coconut trees there. Fruits were quite mature but i guess they do not eat them. But one of the palms seemed too miserable.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
3 hours ago, kingdom67 said:

Sydney's climate is very close to the madeira funchal climate.

 

Also;
I traveled to many countries, i made holiday on the beaches. Although it is very humid there is a very different and pleasant nature in (south)Turkey. If I'm not mistaken i saw coconut trees there. Fruits were quite mature but i guess they do not eat them. But one of the palms seemed too miserable.

Welcome to the Palmtalk forum Christian.

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Cluster
On 2/2/2018, 8:50:57, kingdom67 said:

Sydney's climate is very close to the madeira funchal climate.

 

Also;
I traveled to many countries, i made holiday on the beaches. Although it is very humid there is a very different and pleasant nature in (south)Turkey. If I'm not mistaken i saw coconut trees there. Fruits were quite mature but i guess they do not eat them. But one of the palms seemed too miserable.

Welcome to Palmtalk Christian!

I agree with you that the weather follows the same warming up pattern as Funchal, but still the climates are very different when it counts the most, winter coldest months.

There is a big difference since Sydney lows are 5 C (9F) below Funchal (coolest, highest elevation station) and their highs are still more than 2 C (4+ F) cooler. In my opinion the biggest difference, though, is the immunity to cool/cold days, the record low of Funchal is not far from Sydney average lows and that makes a huge difference long term success. Funchal will never get as cool as even Key West/Havana, but it will never heat up nearly (winter or otherwise) as much as well, it is however very stable, I would call it a very cool tropical climate with a dry season:). I am sure with average conditions Sydney might do well, but a really bad winter with no protection might be harder, worth trying out:)

 

Edited by Cluster
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kingdom67

Excuse me. Hello.

I am forgetful.
Forgot password, I am in a very busy period. I thank you for the information you gave me :)

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James West
On 1 February 2018 4:22:15 pm, PalmatierMeg said:

Suffering?

What doesn't kill me makes me stronger.

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James West
On 5 February 2018 1:18:16 am, Cluster said:

Welcome to Palmtalk Christian!

I agree with you that the weather follows the same warming up pattern as Funchal, but still the climates are very different when it counts the most, winter coldest months.

There is a big difference since Sydney lows are 5 C (9F) below Funchal (coolest, highest elevation station) and their highs are still more than 2 C (4+ F) cooler. In my opinion the biggest difference, though, is the immunity to cool/cold days, the record low of Funchal is not far from Sydney average lows and that makes a huge difference long term success. Funchal will never get as cool as even Key West/Havana, but it will never heat up nearly (winter or otherwise) as much as well, it is however very stable, I would call it a very cool tropical climate with a dry season:). I am sure with average conditions Sydney might do well, but a really bad winter with no protection might be harder, worth trying out:)

 

Hi Cluster. Pretty right there. The main difference between (coastal) Sydney and Funchal is the winter lows. About 9c on the Sydney coast compared to 13-14c in Funchal. Funchal winter highs are about 1-2c above Sydney. But Sydney is less consistent than Funchal - Funchal never gets 46C.  Actually, Lord Howe Island probably has one of the best climates in the world - if you can afford to live there. . .

Regards

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KarenRei

I've got a Fiji dwarf growing in Reykjavík. Do I win?  :)  Or do I need to fruit it first?  It's only a couple years old, still building up that trunk.

 

ED: Oh, dang, it has to be outside, in the ground?

Edited by KarenRei
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James West
3 minutes ago, KarenRei said:

I've got a Fiji dwarf growing in Reykjvík. Do I win?  :)  Or do I need to fruit it first?  It's only a couple years old, still building up that trunk.

I know they grow bananas up there in Reyki. As far as winning is concerned, I've seen penguins sun-baking in the Great Sandy Desert. Outside. Without trunks

3 minutes ago, KarenRei said:

 

 

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KarenRei

I've got banana plants as well (Jamaican Red).  And garcinias, coffee, passionfruit, annonas, acerola, tamarind, and about 50 other species  ;)  And am sitting next to an amazon parrot who's currently preening himself  ;) 

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James West

Sounds great. Can you post a few pics? I have a Mongolian budgerigar here in the fridge feeling a bit left in the cold

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KarenRei

39353987225_3454428776_c.jpg

39540496924_59639383c9_c.jpg

40251753561_e8e6a69b8d_c.jpg

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39037173121_a3fc0410fb_c.jpg

(That's a nearly 5 meter high ceiling  :)  )

Latitude 64.1265.

Edited by KarenRei

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James West

I'm impressed. I'll get back to you on the budgerigar business.

PS: That bird's not stuffed is he? Any moving pics?

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KarenRei

Lol,  he's stuffed in the sense that he's been stealing off my plate  ;) 

If you need video of him, here he is freaking out over a Warpaint song that he for some reason hates: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X78p7RLycAA

Edited by KarenRei

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James West
51 minutes ago, KarenRei said:

Lol,  he's stuffed in the sense that he's been stealing off my plate  ;) 

If you need video of him, here he is freaking out over a Warpaint song that he for some reason hates: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X78p7RLycAA

Nú trúi ég þér. Ég sá myndbandið. Haltu áfram að góðu verki, plönturnar þínar líta vel út.  I'll pop in next time I'm up Iceland way. . .

Allt það besta

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Nick1985

I’m attempting to grow a coconut on Sydney’s Northern beaches. It’s growing heaps of shoots during summer. winter will be the test. It’s in a pot on my balcony north facing, protected from wind. We have  good microclimate here so I’m semi confident in it. I have pineapples going nuts and fruiting here and all down my street there are papayas mangos and bananas. I have also seen a coconut on sydney Harbour around point piper I think. It’s on the property of a millionaire so may have been planted Already establishes. Wasn’t fruiting.  

Ill keep you guys posted. 

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Anamurlu

I could not find the GPS record, I think the photo is fake. Sorry for the wrong comment.

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Nick1985

Hi Anamurlu

yes we call them Kentia Palms. They’re everywhere here. The one I’m talkikg about was definitely a coconut. Not fruiting but they’re unmistakable with the yellow shoots and thicker trunks. I was very surprised to see it and I want to go back but I saw it when I was on a private boat cruise. There is also some mention of it on another page (Burke’s Backyard) 

 

https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/fruiting-edible-coconut-palm/

link there. 

Not exactly dumbfounding evidence but it sounds like the place I was mentioning. 

Edited by Nick1985

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Nick1985

A couple of pics. Still a baby. 

 

Anyone got any tips on prep for winter?

CE0C6C5D-3080-4BFD-A47F-984EEC0CEF1B.jpeg

D3BA4F91-8159-405A-9367-75428453599B.jpeg

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Alicante
On 2/2/2018 21:50:57, kingdom67 said:

Sydney's climate is very close to the madeira funchal climate.

 

Also;
I traveled to many countries, i made holiday on the beaches. Although it is very humid there is a very different and pleasant nature in (south)Turkey. If I'm not mistaken i saw coconut trees there. Fruits were quite mature but i guess they do not eat them. But one of the palms seemed too miserable.

Sydney is very nice but it only comes close to Madeira in summer, the winter is much cooler than in the coastal areas of southern Madeira such as Funchal.

On 4/2/2018 15:18:16, Cluster said:

Welcome to Palmtalk Christian!

I agree with you that the weather follows the same warming up pattern as Funchal, but still the climates are very different when it counts the most, winter coldest months.

There is a big difference since Sydney lows are 5 C (9F) below Funchal (coolest, highest elevation station) and their highs are still more than 2 C (4+ F) cooler. In my opinion the biggest difference, though, is the immunity to cool/cold days, the record low of Funchal is not far from Sydney average lows and that makes a huge difference long term success. Funchal will never get as cool as even Key West/Havana, but it will never heat up nearly (winter or otherwise) as much as well, it is however very stable, I would call it a very cool tropical climate with a dry season:). I am sure with average conditions Sydney might do well, but a really bad winter with no protection might be harder, worth trying out:)

 

I agree Sydney and Funchal are a world apart when it comes to temps, but Funchal/Madeira is completely subtropical, they're still pretty far even from "cool tropical" considering the winter averages. A cool tropical place needs at least 18ºC in the coldest month, remember that, so cool tropical is somewhere like Easter Island! Bermuda is the northernmost place in the world with a tropical climate, it's incredible how warm Bermuda is being at 32ºN. Gulf Stream at it's best!

Edited by Alicante
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Alicante

Coconuts in Malaga, or better said Rincón de la Victoria, Málaga, Spain at 36º 42' N

57e97f49ed86e.jpg

584433dc630f3.JPG

57e97e8c786a0.jpg

I heard there was also a coconut in southern Cyprus at 35ºN but I don't know how it went, I knew it lasted at least 1 or 2 winters there too. 

I had a talk with the owner of these palms in a Spanish forum. She said me she has these palms since 2012, germinated by herself. These coconuts spent their first 2 winters indoors during 3 months a year, but at the 3rd winter (2013/2014) they were already outside 24/7 because the owners weren't able to put them nowhere in the house. As far as I know, this 2017/2018 winter is the 4th they spend outside without any kind of protection. We'll have to see the progress this winter because February has been under average in this area. Looking at official 30 year averages, southern Spain and specially this area have the warmest winter highs in Europe (around 17ºC even in the coldest month) so if it's a small remote possibility in mainland Europe, it should be here. I agree a long term one is more like a dream but at least we know that these are experiencing their 4th winter in a row with an ok aspect! Still they're in pots which makes the ground warmer for them as if they were in direct ground, so that's an advantage. The owner said me they never protected these coconuts after they 2nd winter in 2012/2013. 

Coconuts in Europe? Seems crazy! I agree one from a seedling being always outside won't last more than 1 or 2 winters. But what if they had already a bit of trunk like in this case, where they spent their first 2 winters inside the house? Málaga also had some warmer winters in overall after 2013. I don't know if this will last many winters, and specially given the fact they're in a warmer ground for the pots. Although coconuts are not viable for long term, Roystoneas seem to grow a lot and they get enormous. There are lots of "Caribbean" looking Roystoneas in Málaga, pretty hard to believe it's inside Europe!  

Ruta-Malaga-13_R.jpg

 

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Alicante

About southern Australia, I think Perth can grow them with a nice aspect. Ok, Perth is at 32ºS but still the climate is amazing and these winters are really warm.

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Alicante

For some reason the pics I posted before about the coconuts in Málaga won't show up. I hope they will now. These are pics from July 2017:

2ng90mh.jpg

dd1ma.jpg

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etdrac.jpg

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In case if you want to see more: http://foro.infojardin.com/threads/cocotero-en-sidney-mes-mas-frio-8-16c.56847/page-2 (bottom of the page)

If there is any problem with the link I would remove it, i'm just posting this page to show more info about the pics. 

 

Edited by Alicante
Solving images which won't show up

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Nick1985

Nice Alicante 

i think Sydney and Perth winters are quite similar. Perth can be more consistently hotter but Perth can be also much colder, especially overnight. The last few winters in Sydney we wouldn’t get more than 4/5 days with a maximum under 17c. The minimum won’t drop below 6/7c. I might move my one inside when we get a cold front and we get those maximums under 18

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Anamurlu

similar climates such as southern Turkey

 

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Ekran Alı.PNG

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Nick1985

But still Warmer winters than Malaga. I can tell you that where I live in Sydney, the winters are warmer than in the CBD. I also looked at Malaga’s weather this week in late winter. You have temps well below sydneys average. Comparing Sydney to southern turkey is in accurate as we don’t get anywhere near the extreme lows they get which would kill tropical plants. We have never seen a freezing temperature in the history of records. 

9547028C-DB5A-45FB-855C-67B5CDC21E18.png

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