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Gbarce

Calling out to RPS,Ortanique,Faulkner,Searle etc.

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PalmGuyWC

Jeff,

You had sent in a pic. of yours once before and it's the nicest one I've seen in "captivity" outside of the ones growing in Thailand. It's really a nice looking palm once they get some size, but damn, their slow. With the right conditions, I expect they could live to be a ripe old age. Have you ever checked to see how many fronds yours produce a year? Only about 3 fronds a year here in N. Calif., and that's during the heat of the summer.

Dick

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Ken Johnson

The first pic is a macroglosa hybrid. This is a hospita hybrid.

post-50-1198781896_thumb.jpg

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FossilNypa

(Jeff Searle @ Dec. 12 2007,19:54)

QUOTE
I stumbled upon this today while out looking in the shadehouse and forgot I had this growing. This is Masoala madagascariensis and is really starting to look like something and color up nicely.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

Do you have any tips or advice for germinating Masoala madagascariensis ?

Regards,

Luis Diego.

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Ken Johnson

Not many of these in Florida.

Brahea

post-50-1198790415_thumb.jpg

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Gbarce

Ken - love the Cuban palms!  That group of palms is a real favorite of mine.

The Macroglossa and Hospita were hybridized with what other parent?  What are the distinguishing features of these offspring?

Inquiring minds want to know.

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Jeff Searle

(FossilNypa @ Dec. 27 2007,14:07)

QUOTE

(Jeff Searle @ Dec. 12 2007,19:54)

QUOTE
I stumbled upon this today while out looking in the shadehouse and forgot I had this growing. This is Masoala madagascariensis and is really starting to look like something and color up nicely.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

Do you have any tips or advice for germinating Masoala madagascariensis ?

Regards,

Luis Diego.

Luis,

    No secrets what so ever. I germinated them in just a pot with soil, and no bottom heat. I'm sure I would of got more to sprout if I had used bottom heat.

Jeff

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Jeff Searle

(PalmGuyWC @ Dec. 27 2007,12:38)

QUOTE
Jeff,

You had sent in a pic. of yours once before and it's the nicest one I've seen in "captivity" outside of the ones growing in Thailand. It's really a nice looking palm once they get some size, but damn, their slow. With the right conditions, I expect they could live to be a ripe old age. Have you ever checked to see how many fronds yours produce a year? Only about 3 fronds a year here in N. Calif., and that's during the heat of the summer.

Dick

Dick,

  Thanks, but I never have kept track on how many leaves it puts out in a year. I took some pictures of it today, but I left my camera at the nursery. I'll try to post them tomorrow. It's 7' tall now at the top leaf.

Jeff

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Al in Kona

Talking about Ravenea xerophila, thought I'd share pics of my two biggest ones measuring almost 6 ft. (1.78 m) tall.

post-90-1198816814_thumb.jpg

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Al in Kona

The other one almost the same size . . .

post-90-1198816892_thumb.jpg

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Al in Kona

This palm, Wendlandiella gracilis var. polyclada, is not all that common either.  Here is my plant (still in a container).

post-90-1198817218_thumb.jpg

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Al in Kona

Another palm that is quite rare in cultivation and which was admired much by those who saw it in habitat during the IPS Biennial in the Dominican Republic, is Pseudophoenix ekmanii.  I'm delighted to have this small, very slow growing one growing in the garden.  It measures about 15 inches (38cm) tall.  You likely will not appreciate this palm by looking at my small plant below but if you've ever seen one in person or even a photo of one, then you'll know why a few of us are actually growing this palm, even tho it may well be for the benefit of our grandchildren.  LOL

post-90-1198819817_thumb.jpg

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Al in Kona

I got this palm as a strap-leaf seedliing named Coccothrinax yunquensis, which if it is would be considered very rare.  It has very stiff rigid leaves.

post-90-1198821329_thumb.jpg

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Al in Kona

A small, slow growing Coccothrinax spissa

post-90-1198821503_thumb.jpg

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Al in Kona

Here is my Butia archeri, just slightly smaller than the one Jerry Andersen posted here.  I like this miniature palm.

post-90-1198821759_thumb.jpg

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Al in Kona

Purchased as a tiny seedling with the name Coccothrinax plateada.  It has turned out to be a very nice compact plant that no one was able to identify on a previous post here on Palmtalk.

post-90-1198822177_thumb.jpg

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Jeff Searle

(Al in Kona @ Dec. 27 2007,23:46)

QUOTE
This palm, Wendlandiella gracilis var. polyclada, is not all that common either.  Here is my plant (still in a container).

Al,

    I have a couple of these myself. This is certainly a really rare palm that you never see. I also have one planted at the house that is doing good. A nice surprise to see yours, and it looks beautiful. Are going to plant it out soon?

Jeff

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Kris

Dear Al  :)

lovely collections of palms....thanks for the fentastic visuals !

lots of love,

Kris  :)

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PalmGuyWC

Al,

I have a couple of B. archeri in 2 gal pots but they are all green. I see yours are a nice silver.  Do you recall if yours were green when they were smaller? Mine were greenhouse grown, but I've been hardening them up outside with as much sun as I can give them, and I think I can detect some silver on the petioles of the two new fronds.

Dick

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Al in Kona

Dick, in answer to your above question about Butia archeri - yes, mine was quite green when younger.  As it gets older it seems to take on a bit more silver tone to it.  Mine is in full sun.  I would assume there is genetic diversity in it just as in, say Brahea armata and you can get a wide range of silver/blue intensity to even a green form.  This is a unique miniature palm, just like a real nice large Butia but oh, so small.

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PalmGuyWC

Hi Al,

Thanks for the information. Mine were given to me by Darold Petty who thought they would do better in my hot summer climate. They were in liners, so I potted them up immediately into larger pots. They were growing in a greenhouse and they are slowly acclimating to an outside climate.  So far they have only grown two new fronds, but they are tighter and harder grown. I'm told they are very rare in cultivation.

Dick

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Jeff Searle

(Jeff Searle @ Dec. 27 2007,12:21)

QUOTE

(PalmGuyWC @ Dec. 27 2007,09:09)

QUOTE
Jeff,

How about posting a pic of your Ravenea xerophylla?  I somehow missed seeing it at your BD party.

Dick

Dick,

    Oh, I'm sorry you did'nt get a chance to see it. It was only a matter of about 50' away from the patio where everyone was. I'm going to get a shot of it soon.

Jeff

Dick,

    Here's some photos that I just recently took. Their also posted under the Ravenea xeropyhlla topic.

Jeff

post-23-1199033109_thumb.jpg

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Jeff Searle

Here it is again with Encephalartos horridus growing in front of it.

Jeff

post-23-1199033193_thumb.jpg

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PalmGuyWC

Thanks Jeff,

What can I say except a bad habit I've picked up from S. Calif.? Swoooon?? Yours look great with the Encephalartos, in fact at that stage of growth, they look like a cycad.

Dick

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Al in Kona

Very nice Ravenea xerophilas Jeff.  I'm a bit anxious to see how they will look once they start to develop some actual trunk.  This is one of those palms that I think we will be very happy we planted despite their initial slow growth.

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Jeff Searle

Here's another Licuala that is not found in collections very often. It's Licuala peekelii from New Guinea. Seed became available many years ago only one time. This one is now setting good viable seed for me.

Jeff

post-23-1199073761_thumb.jpg

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Jeff Searle

I collected over eighty seed back earlier in the year for my first time. Now it's holding it's second spike of seed.

Jeff

post-23-1199073896_thumb.jpg

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bgl

My one and only Chambeyronia lepidota (opening a new frond). This palm is S-L-O-W. Only about 4 ft tall, and I planted it in July 1997 from a 4 inch pot.

post-22-1199340184_thumb.jpg

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JD in the OC

Bo,

Do lepidota's push red or bronze new leaves often?  I know houialou's usually never produce any red...

JD

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madagascarbob

(bgl @ Jan. 03 2008,01:03)

QUOTE
My one and only Chambeyronia lepidota (opening a new frond). This palm is S-L-O-W. Only about 4 ft tall, and I planted it in July 1997 from a 4 inch pot.

I planted Mine about the same time . Got it from Louis Hooper . Died last summer for no apparent reason . In the top 5 of slow palms for me .

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bgl

JD,

mine always opens up with a bronze colored frond, but it only seems to happen about once a year!! :(

Bo-Göran

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Jeff Searle

(JD in the OC @ Jan. 03 2008,09:21)

QUOTE
Bo,

Do lepidota's push red or bronze new leaves often?  I know houialou's usually never produce any red...

JD

JD,

    My two in the ground open with a red leaf, and are pretty slow.

Jeff

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Dave-Vero

I need to find a nice spot for my Coccothrinax spissa, obtained from GTC Palms of Merritt Island.  This seems a great genus for south Florida, especially in that they're small enough to fit in most peoples' yards.

The Dominican Republic should start advertising itself as the Galapagos of the Caribbean.

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fiji jim

Some really nice stuff there.

Great to see different palms from the more common.

But what about the ozzie boys, where's your stuff?

I am sure Utopia, Clayton will have something new to show us.

So to bring this thread to the west side of the Pacific I will start with a palm that I know nobody else has as it has yet to be officially described as seed has never been collected. The parrots keep beating us to it.

A couple of the few that I dug up from the bush survived and are growing OK now a few months later.

Balaka sp. Natewa

Jim

post-710-1199515746_thumb.jpg

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fiji jim

While I was taking the previous pic I was stunned by the beauty of the new leaf of one of our close-by Pelagodoxa so had to show it even though it is well known.

Jim

post-710-1199515960_thumb.jpg

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Gbarce

Bump- I wanna see more

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bgl

Not sure how unusual this palm is: Ponapea ledermanniana

post-22-1200037664_thumb.jpg

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Gbarce

Bo- I sure haven't heard of it.  

How long are the flowers/inflorescence (is that the correct term)?

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