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frondly

freeze damage to potted seedlings, various var.

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frondly

Hi all,

I have a number of 1 to 2-yr old plants, t.fortunei, wash, nannorhops, phoenix. I  left a half dozen or so outside in their pots under a poly greenhouse cover (under the eave) during a recent freeze. but I think it was too much. Think these will survive? Any tips on rehab? Also, note the white fungal looking stuff on the bigger trachy... any suggestions on resolving that? This was in Vancouver BC, 8-9 zone I guess, temps dropped to -10C for a couple of days but I think they were only outside for one day of that.

Appreciate your inputs!

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Palmlex

If the pots froze, they might be gone. What I would do, at least for the better looking ones, is wait until the spears pull (which shouldn't take too long, considering their appearance) and drench the holes the spears came from with a fungicide or 3% hydrogen peroxide. You could probably do that even before the spears pull, but then you'd have to do it again after and they still might not survive if the pots froze solid.

Edited by Palmlex
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frondly

Amazing, thank you. I will. And I assume I should let the soil continue to completely dry out inside before even thinking of adding water?

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Palmlex

You wouldn't want the pots to dry out completely, but they should be kept a little drier. I see something white at the base of the first one (the first picture). Is that mold? If it is, it doesn't look very good and maybe they should be watered less often.

Judging by the way they look, I would say most of them look pretty toast to me, but they're photos so I could be wrong. What gives them a chance is the duration of the freeze. If you're saying they only spent around a day in that temperature and under some sort of cover, there might still be a chance.

Do any of their spears still feel solid/rigid to the touch and when you pull on them? Have any of their strap leaves retained their shape (not shriveled up)?

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frondly

Good to note, the soil is still slightly damp/dark despite being inside for a couple weeks now, though it's almost dried. I'll keep an eye on them. Even the ones that I brought in earlier, if they do go dry and the leaves will wrap up but they quickly open up again with even nominal water. These ones seem like they have a chance of following suit. Mostly leaving them as is for at least a week or three. Weather outside is already turning a small corner, now closer to 5-10c.

All of the spears still feel solid and connected, so I'm retaining hope.

and yes, the first one does seem to have a bit of mold. I noticed it as I have a red+blue lamp on them which seemed to do a black light effect on anything organic (the mold showed up as bright purple!), and only that one showed up with visible mold, so I separated it and sprayed it with peroxide. Will keep it in a different room until we see what happens with them all. 

fingers crossed!

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Jimhardy

Not a good sign when the blades close up like that...mark the spears and see if they move

if they don't pull out....its possible they could live but it is tough on the young ones.

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DreaminAboutPalms

I have a bunch of Washingtonia robustifera seedlings on 4th and 5th leaf on my balcony and we had a few cooler mornings of 25 and 27 in Austin last week and two of my purer looking robustas with bright red trunk are having issues now. I pulled two spears on one of them, poured some peroxide down the crown, and now we wait (other fronds look fine), and on the other one there is a spear barely visible which I have marked, and another that has closed up but neither have pulled yet. I was out of town for a week prior to freeze when we had weather in the 70's, then I didn't want to water them in the two days  before the freeze. Its possible they are suffering from effects of under watering

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D Palm

I would definitely peroxide and follow with a dose of copper fungicide. The soil looks too boggy. Scrape that green moss out and add some perlite when you pot up to help drainage. A heat may or some way to get 80+ temps will help them recover.

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frondly

I've put them on a heat mat and turned up the heat in that room, they get 12 hrs of a lighting kit daily... they seem to be holding the line thus far, I think it'll be more apparent when weather turns the corner in a month or so and I can see how they react to spring as compared to their sisters who came inside before the frost.  at this point... it is what it is I think!

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