Jump to content
NickJames

C. Macrocarpa in Atlantic Beach

Recommended Posts

NickJames

My friend @shminbabe has a c. Macrocarpa that she is worried about. 

per her words; the newest growth has “gone limp” 

It’s been cool in Atlantic Beach but certainly nowhere near frost or freeze territory. She has an amazing microclimate. 
 

does the palm look okay?

D34D8746-3E66-45F8-B874-63895BB16752.jpeg

CC06D41E-6073-4576-8D88-B1F877C38F33.jpeg

0E5BDF7F-AB27-4DC7-AE60-66D2F0741D85.jpeg

3B06CC13-13E5-4339-A8CA-456370B1E679.jpeg

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
96720

I have one that had a frond come out like that and that one frond still looks limp but the next one came out fine I Don’t know why it did that but I think it will be ok.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
redant

Looks a little wimpy to me. These are pretty hardy palms, generally easy but that one looks like it's suffering a bit. It's not the weather.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
96720

You can see the one frond is still wim
py 

D233F53C-831B-45B6-9337-E6830708A3C7.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KDubU

Interesting someone is having a go with this palm in Jacks. I know it tends to be warmer by the coast but did not think the area could support this one. Interested to see how it fairs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
96720

Mine is in Phoenix talk about heat!!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
howfam
On 11/25/2021 at 11:41 PM, NickJames said:

My friend @shminbabe has a c. Macrocarpa that she is worried about. 

per her words; the newest growth has “gone limp” 

It’s been cool in Atlantic Beach but certainly nowhere near frost or freeze territory. She has an amazing microclimate. 
 

does the palm look okay?

D34D8746-3E66-45F8-B874-63895BB16752.jpeg

CC06D41E-6073-4576-8D88-B1F877C38F33.jpeg

0E5BDF7F-AB27-4DC7-AE60-66D2F0741D85.jpeg

3B06CC13-13E5-4339-A8CA-456370B1E679.jpeg

NickJames: Could you please tell me what a C. macrocarpa is?  There are several palms with the species name of "Macrocarpa". 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
howfam
46 minutes ago, Johnny Palmseed said:

@howfam it is a Chambeyronia Macrocarpa.

Thanks for the clarification.  There is a chance for some success with this palm if properly situated (microclimate) and established, especially in Atlantic Beach. Good luck with it, and please keep us updated on its status.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

Hmmm 

Howdy @NickJames good to see you again!

Chambeyronias seem to like clay or clayish soil and a lot of moisture but also decent drainage.

I suspect @shminbabe has soil that might be sandier than the palm likes.

I’ve raised hundreds and they sometimes do that if they thrive a while and get too dry, usually when the potting soil deteriorates.

 
This one isn’t in a pot, I know. 
 

Maybe try a top dressing of some humus or decayed leaves around the base?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Johnny Palmseed
11 hours ago, howfam said:

Thanks for the clarification.  There is a chance for some success with this palm if properly situated (microclimate) and established, especially in Atlantic Beach. Good luck with it, and please keep us updated on its status.

No problem but I doubt this has any long term likelihood of survival. Atlantic Beach is surrounded by water but it’s still Jacksonville. I lived there before moving to Merritt Island and did the zone pushing thing for a while. Until we got a week of temps in the teens. I lost pretty much everything and did not have anything as exotic as this. The USDA zones have been pushed northward based on average minimum temperatures but it doesn’t change the actual minimum temperature that is likely to occur on any given day. Look at what happened in Texas. It has been colder than normal for November and while I haven’t been paying attention to Jacksonville temps, we are around 50 degrees at night. 150 miles south of Atlantic Beach and it’s only November. I never saw a Chambeyronia in Jacksonville and never saw a mature one until we moved here. Of course, there are likely examples between here and Jacksonville but I think this is pushing the zone beyond what is sustainable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shminbabe

Hi guys, I'm the one with the Chambeyronia Macrocarpa aka Flamethrower palm in Atlantic Beach, Fl.  I planted it last April and it was grown from seed on Pine Island, FL.  It is planted under a tall canopy of Magnolia and Live Oak in a maritime forest microclimate about three blocks from the coast.  It is supposed to be cold-hardy to the upper 20s.  I really do have a microclimate going here and yes, it IS cold early this season.  We've have some nights in the 40s already.  I was surprised when this gorgeous frond opened; I thought it might go dormant until Spring.  But it unfurled and was gorgeous red, and that night it was cold, and the next day it was just...limp.  As described.  I am perplexed and concerned!

So I'll try a top dressing of peat moss...and a little prayer!

I also have two Spindle palms, a picabeen, and a king alexander growing here so it should be interesting.  And a coconut palm b/c it was left behind all alone at Home Depot last spring. I know that one is doomed, but it's a fun experiment nonetheless.

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
howfam
4 hours ago, shminbabe said:

Hi guys, I'm the one with the Chambeyronia Macrocarpa aka Flamethrower palm in Atlantic Beach, Fl.  I planted it last April and it was grown from seed on Pine Island, FL.  It is planted under a tall canopy of Magnolia and Live Oak in a maritime forest microclimate about three blocks from the coast.  It is supposed to be cold-hardy to the upper 20s.  I really do have a microclimate going here and yes, it IS cold early this season.  We've have some nights in the 40s already.  I was surprised when this gorgeous frond opened; I thought it might go dormant until Spring.  But it unfurled and was gorgeous red, and that night it was cold, and the next day it was just...limp.  As described.  I am perplexed and concerned!

So I'll try a top dressing of peat moss...and a little prayer!

I also have two Spindle palms, a picabeen, and a king alexander growing here so it should be interesting.  And a coconut palm b/c it was left behind all alone at Home Depot last spring. I know that one is doomed, but it's a fun experiment nonetheless.

 

 I admire your determination and perseverance in growing zone pushed palms. There are people here in Jacksonville with mature Royal palms 20 -plus years in the ground. Dr. Rossi in Hastings has done an amazing job of growing tender palms in Hastings - North Florida.  The palm society meeting at his place next Saturday should be interesting to anyone wanting to grow tender palms. Keep up the good work and keep us updated on the Chambey's progress.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Johnny Palmseed
10 hours ago, shminbabe said:

Hi guys, I'm the one with the Chambeyronia Macrocarpa aka Flamethrower palm in Atlantic Beach, Fl.  I planted it last April and it was grown from seed on Pine Island, FL.  It is planted under a tall canopy of Magnolia and Live Oak in a maritime forest microclimate about three blocks from the coast.  It is supposed to be cold-hardy to the upper 20s.  I really do have a microclimate going here and yes, it IS cold early this season.  We've have some nights in the 40s already.  I was surprised when this gorgeous frond opened; I thought it might go dormant until Spring.  But it unfurled and was gorgeous red, and that night it was cold, and the next day it was just...limp.  As described.  I am perplexed and concerned!

So I'll try a top dressing of peat moss...and a little prayer!

I also have two Spindle palms, a picabeen, and a king alexander growing here so it should be interesting.  And a coconut palm b/c it was left behind all alone at Home Depot last spring. I know that one is doomed, but it's a fun experiment nonetheless.

 

Well it sounds like you could have a chance I guess. A good microclimate and perhaps slightly hardier examples of palms might make a difference. How is the soil in that area? Sandy and dry? One problem with palms in the winter is getting the balance right with watering. Too much and they rot out, but too little and they desiccate. And did you previously fertilize your palms? The Florida sand does not hold any nutrients. Peat moss is a good soil amendment although it works better to add it before planting. By itself it tends to be light and dry and will probably blow away if not tilled in. You could try adding a light coat of pine bark chips as mulch as well. Good luck with your venture and definitely keep posting the progress.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KDubU

Yes please keep us posted! Us NE FL’ers are very interested. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...