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CoconutGambler352

3 different species of Sabal Palms...Help with Identification please

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CoconutGambler352

Here are a few Sabals
In person, The Sabal Palm in the first photo furthest to the right, was actually a VERY tinted Blue color, while the two Sabal closest to me, were the usual colors. 
Photo 2 is the VERY Tinted Blue Sabal I mentioned. 
Photo 3 is photo of a Original Sabal (Right side) and on the left hand Side is a Sabal (Causiarum?) Or maybe just a Hybrid? 
Photos 4&5 are of the Sabal "Hybrid" Look at how HUGE the frond is, to my hand, and the Palm is ONLY about 3.5ft Total Trunk height. Pretty interesting and impressive to me! 

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

Welcome to Palm Talk !!! As far as identification I cant really say but I do see the palm on the right is different. All 3 are basically shade grown so they are very stretched out. Good looking palms whatever they end up being. 

T J 

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CoconutGambler352

I'm thinking the "Blueish" tinted Sabal is a Sabal Uresana.....Anyone else agree? 

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Steve Mac

I didn't realize that Sabals did vary that much. It is quite distinctive and attractive, I'm sure that a local can identify it.

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sonoranfans

yeah sabal uresana, perhaps, with the weeping leaflets.  The bluish petioles and leaf bases look like my uresana as well, but that one has a lot more green in the leaves. very little blue.  The petioles are both thinner and shorter than my uresana but mine is trunking(4') in full sun.   I've seen "Blackburniana" and "riverside" carry that bluish petiole/leafbase tint in part shade.  

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CoconutGambler352
16 hours ago, Steve Mac said:

I didn't realize that Sabals did vary that much. It is quite distinctive and attractive, I'm sure that a local can identify it.

Haha I'm actually a native local...These are off the bike trail...I'm going to go back and get updated pics...These were taken back in October of last year. 

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CoconutGambler352
4 hours ago, sonoranfans said:

yeah sabal uresana, perhaps, with the weeping leaflets.  The bluish petioles and leaf bases look like my uresana as well, but that one has a lot more green in the leaves. very little blue.  The petioles are both thinner and shorter than my uresana but mine is trunking(4') in full sun.   I've seen "Blackburniana" and "riverside" carry that bluish petiole/leafbase tint in part shade.  

That's actually VERY good to hear that.... Would be awesome...I'm debating on going for a bike ride to this place and seeing if there's any flowers...I don't know how to read the fronds level of growth or whatever it's properly called... 

Here's a pic of the three Sabal Palms in the same photo...You can definitely notice that this Sabal is a much "blue-er color" 

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sonoranfans

Here is my uresana a year ago, overall and the trunk.  Its 9 yrs in the ground from a 7 gallon size that I grew from a small strap leaf seedling. uresanamay2020.thumb.jpg.9abec832dda786dec42fb1827a27c226.jpg It hasnt seeded yet though, not sure how long that takes.

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CoconutGambler352
22 hours ago, sonoranfans said:

Here is my uresana a year ago, overall and the trunk.  Its 9 yrs in the ground from a 7 gallon size that I grew from a small strap leaf seedling. uresanamay2020.thumb.jpg.9abec832dda786dec42fb1827a27c226.jpg It hasnt seeded yet though, not sure how long that takes.

Not to say anything, but the dark green boots that have been cut, look exactly how the cut boots on a Sabal Mexicana. Just an idea

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sonoranfans
6 hours ago, CoconutGambler352 said:

Not to say anything, but the dark green boots that have been cut, look exactly how the cut boots on a Sabal Mexicana. Just an idea

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a closer look, at uresana trunk shows plenty of blue tinge absent in mexicana.  The the leaflet color is more blue/grey than is obvious in that pic.  This uresana has a ~28" trunk thickness, leafbases on.  Note how thick the petioles are, uresana is a big sabal.  This one came from seed collected in mexico in the native range of uresana.  Uresana has a bit of variation as seen in palmpedia.  I think they look more blue in the desert, I had one in arizona.  The wax is likly needed in the dry climates of the SW desert.   https://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Sabal_uresana

uresanatrunkdec2020jpg.thumb.jpg.580bc06d4947cca92ba880977bb492c7.jpg

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