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mxcolin

King Palms in Hot Sunny Weather

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mxcolin

We get very hot sunny dry summer days (100°+). My King Palms take the brunt of it. What’s the best way to get them through it? Extra water, which is easy to do? Should I try to put up some shade from the afternoon sun? If shade should I be shading the trunks or the fronds or both?

Thanks

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James B

Afternoon shade is always best for Kings if you are inland and experience dry heat. Lots of water will keep them growing fast during the heat but they will get sun burn. The damage is usually only cosmetic if you water frequently.

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Ben in Norcal
27 minutes ago, mxcolin said:

We get very hot sunny dry summer days (100°+). My King Palms take the brunt of it. What’s the best way to get them through it? Extra water, which is easy to do? Should I try to put up some shade from the afternoon sun? If shade should I be shading the trunks or the fronds or both?

Thanks

They will be fine and adjust eventually, if you keep the water up.  Mine don't burn even in 110+ degrees.  Last summer had a couple of brutal weeks, you will remember - no problem.

In addition to water, my strategy is to pack them in so they provide cover for each other.  Additionally, I recommend maxima, tuckerii, and myolensis sp.  All of these take sun better than cunninghamiana - and wind for that matter.  Purpurea definitely need shade in my part of the East Bay and the Central Valley.

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mxcolin

It's the sun burn I worry about. I've tried to put in shade for afternoon heat but it's difficult to achieve where they are.

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doubravsky

I think over time, if you keep up lots of water, they'll be fine. I have a bunch in Riverside, and even in last year's heat wave (117 high temp) they showed no damage. Definitely sunburned when young, but after a few feet of trunk they acclimated well. 

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BayAndroid

I'm glad this thread was started already, I was about to ask the same thing. I feel like i'm already offering a ton of water (in a drought year...) But if they stop burning with a little bit of age, then I feel more confident that I'm on my way there.  My trees are looking better than the first year, but I just pulled a boot off the crown shaft recently and it's already turning orange. 

I have some Purpurea that are very young. I'm going to plant them in the ground soon, but I have very little shade on the property, I'll just have to keep them well watered and close to the house, I suspect. 

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Ben in Norcal
27 minutes ago, BayAndroid said:

I'm glad this thread was started already, I was about to ask the same thing. I feel like i'm already offering a ton of water (in a drought year...) But if they stop burning with a little bit of age, then I feel more confident that I'm on my way there.  My trees are looking better than the first year, but I just pulled a boot off the crown shaft recently and it's already turning orange. 

I have some Purpurea that are very young. I'm going to plant them in the ground soon, but I have very little shade on the property, I'll just have to keep them well watered and close to the house, I suspect. 

I'd be cautious here.  A purpurea are the most sun sensitive species.  They must have substantial shade, at least in my part of the EB.

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BayAndroid

This will be tough then... I am contemplating putting them on the North side of my house, but when they get tall enough, they will get plenty of sun. 

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Ben in Norcal
1 hour ago, BayAndroid said:

This will be tough then... I am contemplating putting them on the North side of my house, but when they get tall enough, they will get plenty of sun. 

They are slow growing, but I would wait to plant them until you have canopy from other plants.  They are not fans of our very dry heat.  Of course, this depends where you are - I am talking about my experience in the sweltering East Bay.  Lots of microclimates here - probably alright in full sun or close to it, near the coast.

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BayAndroid

I live in Redwood City and the lot I'm on is full sun, everywhere. =| 

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Jim in Los Altos
6 hours ago, BayAndroid said:

I live in Redwood City and the lot I'm on is full sun, everywhere. =| 

Some sun should be fine in Redwood City. You’re cooler than here in Los Altos and I have a group of three young, just now trunking A. purpurea that get full afternoon sun and no problems at all. It’s cooler here than at Ben’s in Clayton so I can see why he’d keep his shaded. 

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