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Brad52

Palms that can take wet feet

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Brad52

I have a spot where I'd like to plant a couple palms but I've observed that during heavy rain (not uncommon) these spots will have standing water for a few hours.  I recall seeing posts of a palm species that does fine in such conditions but do not recall the species.  So my question, what palms suitable for such wet sites should I consider here in Puna?

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Ben in Norcal

All Archontophoenix love this environment.

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jimmyt

Cyrtostachys renda comes to mind.  Correct me if I am incorrect.:unsure:

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John hovancsek

Maritia flexulosa if you want a nice big palm

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John hovancsek

Screenshot_20201122-095242_Google.jpg

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colin Peters

Metroxylon sp's

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Brad52
1 hour ago, John hovancsek said:

Maritia flexulosa

My that is a big lad!  

 

To expose the lava, I'm peeling off the root mass covering a nicely shaped lava flow/shelf that faces another one coming from the opposite direction.  There is a low area in between them and it is a pond today.  There are a few spots adjacent to or in these flows where I could plant a palm and nice palms growing out of a lava shelf seems like it would be attractive.  The best planting sites are under water right now.  It looks like some pockets for bromeliads on the flows and I can plant kalo or other wet tolerant plants in the pond though it is deep enough today I'm not sure about that. 

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Jim in Los Altos

With your average temperatures there are tons of possiilities. If I lived where you do, I’d have a grove of Red Ceiling Wax palms (Cyrtostachys renda). 

FE182887-62FA-4267-8363-6A21A56F0EB2.thumb.png.223dfefafbdb783a3fa92a0a536d8659.png

DE9627DD-72FD-4177-B48D-0EB408E245CB.jpeg.c3a3af9f48447e1292d42296cd161dce.jpeg

Edited by Jim in Los Altos
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LivistonaFan
1 minute ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

Red Ceiling Wax palms (Cyrtostachys renda). 

I'd probably do the same:greenthumb:

 

Another species that wouldn't mind these conditions (because it is partly sharing its habitat with Nypa fruticans) is Oncosperma tigillarium (photo from palmpedia):

Ot01.jpg

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quaman58

Ravenea musicalis, ha ha. Although I do remember Jeff at Floribunda doing his best to keep one alive..

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Brad52
1 hour ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

Cyrtostachys renda

I am planning on getting some of these and their contrast with the lava would be outstanding, thus far all the ones I've seen are quite pricey save for the wee sizes, I am hoping to find a good source of larger pots that are not quite so pricey.

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John hovancsek
1 hour ago, Brad52 said:

I am planning on getting some of these and their contrast with the lava would be outstanding, thus far all the ones I've seen are quite pricey save for the wee sizes, I am hoping to find a good source of larger pots that are not quite so pricey.

Walmart has small ones for 15$ I just got a few because of the price

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Frond-friend42

Nypa fruticans.  An aquatic species. Probably not pretty enough. What about Ravenea rivularis? 

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Fusca

Licuala paludosa is another swamp dweller.  (Pic borrowed from Palmpedia).

679px-Paludosa_habitat04.jpg.729c9f8dbf9f781322f5f5c263c84e9d.jpg

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Brad52

These are all great suggestions, the general area is large enough to have a mix of these different forms.

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Tyrone

All Roystonea and many Livistona. Euterpe oleracea as well. 

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hbernstein

Ravenea rivularis love it wet and look great when happy.  A lovely smaller clustering species is Mauritiella armata.

Various Raphia species are big and impressive and like it wet.

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Merlyn

For smaller ones, I know Licuala Grandis, Peltata and Peltata v. Sumawongii like it swampy.  My local FL grower MB Palms grows his in pots with no bottom holes.  He buys (or makes) pots with holes a couple of inches up the sides, so the bottom of the pot is always soggy.  I think (but am not sure) that most Licuala like growing in swamps.

Fairchild has a cluster of Nypa Fruticans growing in the lake, I'd love to grow that one here.  But, alas, it takes severe damage below about 33F and 2 died at Leu Gardens in the 29F 2009 freeze.

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Brad52

I think it's great that many of the species on my wish list are popping up here as tolerating or thriving in wet soils.  Yesterday I had a small pond about 20" deep in the area and 3 hours later it had drained.

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Xenon

Cyrtostachys elegans

Carpoxylon

Hydriastele costata 

Normanbya 

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abdalav

Euterpe oleracea

Copernicia prunifera

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Kim

If you want something smaller to go along with your other choices, Hydriastele rheophytica is a very slender clustering palm with an elegant look. In habitat it grows along riverbanks,  thus the name rheophytica.  I would guess it will respond well to being flooded now and again. However if your chosen spot is unremitting full sun, maybe not such a perfect choice? Mine get some degree of shade off and on during the day. 

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Brad52

Very nice looking the Hydriastele rheophytica, the shade I have is what will be created by other plants not yet in ground.  I hope to visit a nursery this week where I might be able to obtain a couple of larger palms that might throw some shade.

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John hovancsek

Chelyocarpus chuco is a nice clustering palm that are found on the banks of rivers 

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DoomsDave

Licuala ramsayi 

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GottmitAlex

Cocos nucifera.

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NOT A TA

Phoenix roebelenii and Chamaedorea cataractarum will also take flooded conditions regularly.

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Merlyn
On 11/23/2020 at 8:33 PM, abdalav said:

Copernicia prunifera

Can Copernicia Prunifera take tons of water and swampy soil?  I planted my small seedlings in a drier, full sun and sandy area in my lot, since the Palmpedia site said they originated in dry savannah areas.  If they are happier with more water then I should probably adjust my drippers on the triple in the ground.

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Brad52

Took this list palm shopping today but only managed to obtain the Maritia flexulosa for the wet area.  Still managed to get 11 more species though for other sites, thanks to a visit to the Bill Austin nursery - thanks Bill for the hospitality, conversation, tour and great plants!

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abdalav
On 11/26/2020 at 10:44 PM, Merlyn2220 said:

Can Copernicia Prunifera take tons of water and swampy soil?  I planted my small seedlings in a drier, full sun and sandy area in my lot, since the Palmpedia site said they originated in dry savannah areas.  If they are happier with more water then I should probably adjust my drippers on the triple in the ground.

They live in marshes and river banks located in a very dry habitat called caatinga.

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