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graupel

I need natural fungicide for mold on coconut during germination

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graupel

Hi everybody!

I have a serious problem with germination of the coconuts. Many coconuts start to rot during the germination (some seedlings survive only). The surface of the coconuts and the embryo are covered with the white fuzzy / powder mold. I realize that the germination of the coconuts from the supermarkets is often associated with a high risk of failure, but if it is possible, I would at least want to minimize the formation of the molds on the coconuts. Since I grow the coconut palms indoor (I have a large south window where I grow my coconut palms for several years), I would like to use some natural (not chemical) fungicides. So far, I've only tried potassium permanganate, but it didn't help. What other natural fungicide do you recommend? I read on the internet that some natural products can be effective, such as: cinnamon, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol (short-term action only), seasalt water (coconut palms tolerate it highly), baking soda and liquid grapefruit seed extract (GSE). At the moment I don't have the opportunity to experiment with all the possibilities, so to make my situation easier, I want to ask you: Which natural product has the best fungicidal effects to kill the white fuzzy / powder molds?

Thank you!

Sincerely,

Miroslav

14666069_1193558707357132_5859715349430796273_n.jpg

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Steve Mac

Hi Miroslav, Is hydrogen peroxide natural enough for you? That should fix it.

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graupel
11 hours ago, gtsteve said:

Hi Miroslav, Is hydrogen peroxide natural enough for you? That should fix it.

I admit that not all products listed in my post are natural. For correct: I need the natural (or chemical) products that are safe for people if I use them indoor. Unfortunately, on the market are available only mostly the aggressive chemical fungicides for outdoor use.

So, what percentage of the hydrogen peroxide should I use? How many milliliters of hydrogen peroxide should I use per one liter of water?

Thank you very much for your help! :)

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Steve Mac

A lot of us just tip 3% HP straight out of the bottle into the top of plants that have crown rot, inside or outside. If you are not eating the coconut I can't see any risk. I have seen a detailed description on here before on how peroxide works, a search should find it. Just put peroxide in the search box and see what you get.

I think that you only need 2 or 3 drops of 3% HP on that coco and it will be safe but continue your research, don't just take my novice opinion.

Also I would treat all of the cocos as soon as you get them before the fungus appears if possible.

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chad2468emr

I second HP. It’s as safe and natural as you can get for this. Considering some of its most common uses are as an antiseptic on open wounds and as mouthwash, you really don’t need to worry about it poisoning much. I splash it on my palms any time I notice something that’s a little too “funky” looking for me to feel good about it. 

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climate change virginia

cinnimon willl work killed mushrooms on my lemon plant overnight

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graupel

Until now, I had germinated the coconuts in a ziplock bag, but now it occurred to me that I would try to germinate the coconuts in the moist sand (or in the sterilized soil). I will bury the coconut in half in the soil / sand, but I will NOT cover the pot with the foil to ensure air circulation. I will water it regularly. One half of the coconut, including the embryo in the largest "eye", will be moist in the sand and the other half of the coconut with the remaining two "eyes" will be almost dry above the soil / sand. Would that be the right germination method? Although the coconuts like to germinate in a humid environment, but I think that a very wet environment is probably harmful (as it's in the case of the ziplock bag). P.S.: The picture is illustrated only.

12188080_975911485788523_2346388682001512371_o.jpg

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kinzyjr
3 minutes ago, graupel said:

Until now, I had germinated the coconuts in a ziplock bag, but now it occurred to me that I would try to germinate the coconuts in the moist sand (or in the sterilized soil). I will bury the coconut in half in the soil / sand, but I will NOT cover the pot with the foil to ensure air circulation. I will water it regularly. One half of the coconut, including the embryo in the largest "eye", will be moist in the sand and the other half of the coconut with the remaining two "eyes" will be almost dry above the soil / sand. Would that be the right germination method? Although the coconuts like to germinate in a humid environment, but I think that a very wet environment is probably harmful (as it's in the case of the ziplock bag). P.S.: The picture is illustrated only.

I think you'll see a lot less mold doing it this way.  This is basically how they sprout on the beach.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
On 11/15/2020 at 11:28 AM, graupel said:

I admit that not all products listed in my post are natural. For correct: I need the natural (or chemical) products that are safe for people if I use them indoor. Unfortunately, on the market are available only mostly the aggressive chemical fungicides for outdoor use.

So, what percentage of the hydrogen peroxide should I use? How many milliliters of hydrogen peroxide should I use per one liter of water?

Thank you very much for your help! :)

Don't dilute the hydrogen peroxide.  Use it at 3% like what is sold in the stores (I am assuming you can get the same percentage there).

John

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Yossik

The best way to prevent all molds, pests, mites etc is to use a UV germicidal lamp.

You can order one of those lamps in AliExpress , ebay, etc...

Make sure the lamp have UVC frequency in addition to UVA and UVB frequencies.

Make sure to turn off the lamp when you are near the lamp because UV radiation can cause skin cancer 

if a person is exposed for prolonged time the the UV light.

I hope this helps

 

Yossi

 

Edited by Yossik

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