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James Robert

ID This Palm

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James Robert

Hey everyone,  I am kinda new, but love different type of palms.

I'm in Greenville SC (zone7b).Seen this palm down town. This tree is absolutely gorgeous.  Could someone tell what it is.

I'm guessing some type of washingtonia?

Please let me know, I want to purchase one. (By the way this one looks like it will have be moved, hitting the ceiling)

 

20200902_141747.jpg

20200902_141738.jpg

20200902_141733.jpg

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kinzyjr

Washingtonia robusta (or at least a robusta-dominant hybrid)

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James Robert

Thanks, Thats what i was thinking. 

I found someone selling something similar, they are calling it a fan palm, is it the same, or close. 

 

20200902_165510.jpg

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DAVEinMB
7 minutes ago, James Robert said:

Thanks, Thats what i was thinking. 

I found someone selling something similar, they are calling it a fan palm, is it the same, or close. 

 

20200902_165510.jpg

Those look like sabal palmetto

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
7 minutes ago, James Robert said:

Thanks, Thats what i was thinking. 

I found someone selling something similar, they are calling it a fan palm, is it the same, or close. 

 

20200902_165510.jpg

In the first pic that was definitely a washingtonia, but I am fairly certain these two are palmettos

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James Robert

Wow, They have them listed as fan palms, asking a 100.00 for each.

Thanks everyone. 

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jimmyt

I would have to agree with kinzyjr and DAVEinMB’s assessment.  Are the potted Sabals in 7Gal pots?

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Fusca
5 minutes ago, James Robert said:

Wow, They have them listed as fan palms, asking a 100.00 for each.

Thanks everyone. 

That's a good deal if they are container grown.  If they were field-dug (and it looks like they were) they will likely die soon so I wouldn't advise getting them.  But they are more cold hardy than the Washingtonia.

Edited by Fusca
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NC_Palm_Enthusiast

I agree with @Fusca. If they are container grown or regenerated 100 bucks isn't a bad deal. I wish I could find some that size around here

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James Robert

I will go look at them this weekend,  Is there any sure way I can tell if they were field dug.

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Brad Mondel

Where did you find those palmettos for sale? I am in Anderson. I have seen that Washingtonia before and the only reason it survives in Greenville is because of the microclimate that it has. The overhang and southern exposure with concrete keep it alive through the winter by trapping heat.

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buffy

James: They're both fan palms. Two of the major leaf forms are fan palms (like these two - handlike) and pinnate palms (think coconut palms). There are others, but for starters, that's a good way of seeing them.

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PalmatierMeg

You could ask if those Sabals are field dug to see what the guy says. But if he says, "No", I would have trouble believing him. I see no reason to hack off all the fronds in pot grown specimens but field dug Sabals have almost all their fronds cut off to reduce transpiration while the palm regrows its root systems. Those Sabals in the photos are too short to have been safely field dug and will almost surely die. It is not safe to transplant/dig up Sabals with less that 4' to 6' of clear trunk. Sabals with less clear trunk than that still have their growing point underground. If you try to dig up such a palm, you will shatter/damage the growing point and kill the palm. That seller appears to know very little about palms, including the name of what he's peddling

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James Robert

Thanks everyone. I'm learning a lot on here. After doing a

little research as well, I understand fully,  I'm almost at a point might just stick to my pindo and windmills.

Edited by James Robert
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