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Marc

Phoenix push-out in pots?

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Marc

Can one effectively prune phoenix roots and what is the best strategy for doing that?  I have a number of phoenix in large pots (e.g., 25G plus) and unlike most other families, phoenix will grow roots so aggressively that they will lift the entire palm, root base, soil and all right out of the pot such that it's no longer aesthetic.  I'm attaching two photos below that show this.  I think it was in a David Lesser book that I saw a photo at Versailles with many dozens of date palms in pots, i.e., I'd like to keep these in pots of the same size but this would require aggressive root pruning strategies.  Does anyone have any words of wisdom?  The species I've got in mind are Dactilyfera and Reclinata.

IMG_20200606_165239220.jpg

IMG_20200606_165257205.jpg

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Pal Meir

Yes, you can:

1480684712_Phoenixcanariensis1980-05-2080N05-0336-Arbeitskopie2.thumb.jpg.d09dcb76a3c1854ded35461cd2782e78.jpg

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Pal Meir

And the palm above did not show any problems afterwards:

9446888_Phoenixcanariensis1989-09-07L.thumb.jpg.5debd322b3b57d296188777068c2eef2.jpg

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PalmX
6 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

And the palm above did not show any problems afterwards:

9446888_Phoenixcanariensis1989-09-07L.thumb.jpg.5debd322b3b57d296188777068c2eef2.jpg



This can't be the case will all palms though right? I've heard that simply agitating roots with your fingers when repotting some palms causes them to throw a hissy fit.

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Allen
1 hour ago, PalmX said:



This can't be the case will all palms though right? I've heard that simply agitating roots with your fingers when repotting some palms causes them to throw a hissy fit.

Some fronds or tips may die on your palm but a pot is never ideal in any circumstance anyway.

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Marc

Those phoenix look awesome!  Great job (and great advice).

Regarding the second commend from PalmX, that's right - some palms (especially for example Bismarkia) are notoriously tempermental when it comes to anything having to do with their roots.....  Speaking just personally, I've found Phoenix to be especially aggressive with their roots as well as Chamaerops, i.e., these are the only palms in my limited experience I've had this problem with, though I'm sure there are others that will push out as well.

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Pal Meir

I made the same procedure with my Chamaerops bonsai:

763124827_Chamaerops19862018-08-01P1040792.thumb.jpg.527c7ed3120ebee160cb9fcdbfa8b91e.jpg

972404658_Chamaerops19862018-08-01P1040793.thumb.jpg.6971cc37b2310088e3156252bfd91313.jpg

1737536639_Chamaerops19862018-07-28P1040781.thumb.jpg.399b6704e78bc31d45e05f5883e2b3dd.jpg

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Pal Meir

And here I was inspecting the results after that root pruning one year later:

508266893_Chamaerops19862019-09-03P1050258.thumb.jpg.170d753e491c064eb835a2fe5b55e35b.jpg

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Antti

Hello Marc, I have the same problem constantly with Phoenix canariensis, Trachycarpus fortunei and Chámaerops humilis. Later I tried to move palm into bigger pot saving all the roots but now it's not possible anymore. The other problem in such cases is difficulties with watering, the soil become drier and it's shape is far from suitable for watering. Though it's not the best resolution IMHO but I'll have to cut roots as it was shown before. :(

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