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Palmobsessed

Date Palm? More interesting Palms in North Myrtle Beach

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Palmobsessed

How ya’ll doing! So in North Myrtle Beach, I always see some interesting species that I don’t normally see in Myrtle Beach proper. In Myrtle Beach, it is mainly littered with Palmetto’s and Butias, as well as the occasional Mexican Fan Palm. But NMB has some very healthy and larger amounts of Mexican fan Palms compared to Myrtle Beach, what appears to be Sago palms, Mediterranean Palms, some Date Palms, ad then whatever these are (I think they are Date Palms).

I have seen a few Canary Island Date Palms in NMB as well. I think these are Date Palms,  but they look a little different to me.. maybe I am just crazy. Normally you wouldn’t see these until Charleston, and generally even until Jacksonville Florida before they are to common. I spotted these two today in Cherry Grove, NMB, SC, and I think they too, are date Palms. I have some other photos of different similar palms up here as well. Thank you! 

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950600CA-3D0E-4834-AC73-7A90226F9558.jpeg

Edited by Palmobsessed
Just adding a sentence
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Palmobsessed

Other pictures from like a month ago that I believe are also Date Palms. (There are of course some other palms in the pictures. The first one has a baby ?Sago? palm? The second one has a few different kinds. If anyone could be so kind as to identify the palms other than the Palmetto’s, Butia’s, and Mexican fans please! And second picture, the Date (I believe) is the one to the right, with the leaves kind of growing “upwards”. 

971A2CC0-2080-4658-97FD-279353635D18.jpeg

6EA60847-AEFE-4A4D-B50D-B90A88AA17EA.jpeg

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Estlander
1 hour ago, Palmobsessed said:

How ya’ll doing! So in North Myrtle Beach, I always see some interesting species that I don’t normally see in Myrtle Beach proper. In Myrtle Beach, it is mainly littered with Palmetto’s and Butias, as well as the occasional Mexican Fan Palm. But NMB has some very healthy and larger amounts of Mexican fan Palms compared to Myrtle Beach, what appears to be Sago palms, Mediterranean Palms, some Date Palms, ad then whatever these are (I think they are Date Palms).

I have seen a few Canary Island Date Palms in NMB as well. I think these are Date Palms,  but they look a little different to me.. maybe I am just crazy. Normally you wouldn’t see these until Charleston, and generally even until Jacksonville Florida before they are to common. I spotted these two today in Cherry Grove, NMB, SC, and I think they too, are date Palms. I have some other photos of different similar palms up here as well. Thank you! 

5A3621DD-DBB4-4A8A-AB76-628B9DE995E4.jpeg

950600CA-3D0E-4834-AC73-7A90226F9558.jpeg

Those two are definitely Canary Island Date Palms. 

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Palmobsessed
52 minutes ago, Estlander said:

Those two are definitely Canary Island Date Palms. 

Thank you, that’s what I figured. Just wasn’t, as they say, willing to bet my life on it. That’s cool I’ve been finding quite healthy specimens at the 33.5 latitude, but on the east coast, so we can get similar frost to say even 39 degrees North in California, Gualala Cali, or 39 degrees North in Europe, like Palma Island. Spain. Both pretty much the same climate as Myrtle Beach, SC in the winter months (December, January, February)

What’s more cold hardy? Palmettos or the Canary Island Date Palms? I figured the Palmettos were, but maybe they just don’t grow Date Palms as much around here as much as they love Palmettos. The Date Palms even grow in Gualala, even though it doesn’t get to warm there ever. It just also never gets TO cold.

Edited by Palmobsessed
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Mr.SamuraiSword
1 hour ago, Palmobsessed said:

Thank you, that’s what I figured. Just wasn’t, as they say, willing to bet my life on it. That’s cool I’ve been finding quite healthy specimens at the 33.5 latitude, but on the east coast, so we can get similar frost to say even 39 degrees North in California, Gualala Cali, or 39 degrees North in Europe, like Palma Island. Spain. Both pretty much the same climate as Myrtle Beach, SC in the winter months (December, January, February)

What’s more cold hardy? Palmettos or the Canary Island Date Palms? I figured the Palmettos were, but maybe they just don’t grow Date Palms as much around here as much as they love Palmettos. The Date Palms even grow in Gualala, even though it doesn’t get to warm there ever. It just also never gets TO cold.

Sabal Palmetto are quite a bit hardier, and their native range is larger than the areas on the east coast than where you can reliably grow CIDP.  Sabals when not faced with ocean winds can be found in Virginia beach and Norfolk and as northeast as Raleigh NC though they are more marginal there.  trunking Canary island date palms are seldom seen north of southern coastal NC . heres one Big one I found in Ocean Isle beach NC.. Ones this size seem to be rare north of myrtle beach while small non trunked ones seem more common until Ocracoke

https://www.google.com/maps/@33.8903651,-78.4255413,3a,28.7y,132.55h,91.65t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sH_ENNB15kYEBasOAUK_I4Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Screen Shot 2019-09-15 at 9.06.59 PM.png

Edited by Mr.SamuraiSword

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Palmobsessed
2 hours ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Sabal Palmetto are quite a bit hardier, and their native range is larger than the areas on the east coast than where you can reliably grow CIDP.  Sabals when not faced with ocean winds can be found in Virginia beach and Norfolk and as northeast as Raleigh NC though they are more marginal there.  trunking Canary island date palms are seldom seen north of southern coastal NC . heres one Big one I found in Ocean Isle beach NC.. Ones this size seem to be rare north of myrtle beach while small non trunked ones seem more common until Ocracoke

https://www.google.com/maps/@33.8903651,-78.4255413,3a,28.7y,132.55h,91.65t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sH_ENNB15kYEBasOAUK_I4Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Screen Shot 2019-09-15 at 9.06.59 PM.png

Nice! Thanks for the info! That one looks pretty trunked, but the ones here in NMB definitely looking a bit healthier! Lol. 

 

I think the CIDP’s here actually look better than the ones I saw in Charleston, strangely enough. I think North Myrtle Beach has great soil, and dedicated gardeners. 

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Palmobsessed

Biggest CIDP ever, from a Taco Bell in Jacksonville, FL, and then some other palms from Orlando and cocoa Beach. Another CIDP at Disney, and some Queens? At Cocoa beach. Some small palm, not sure what it is, from a hotel next to the Taco Bell in Jacksonville.  I have a lot more from Bogota, Florida, Miami, and Myrtle as well, and from Hunting Island State Park near Hilton Head, SC. I need to make a Palm album 

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DAVEinMB
On 9/15/2019 at 4:55 PM, Palmobsessed said:

Other pictures from like a month ago that I believe are also Date Palms. (There are of course some other palms in the pictures. The first one has a baby ?Sago? palm? The second one has a few different kinds. If anyone could be so kind as to identify the palms other than the Palmetto’s, Butia’s, and Mexican fans please! And second picture, the Date (I believe) is the one to the right, with the leaves kind of growing “upwards”. 

971A2CC0-2080-4658-97FD-279353635D18.jpeg

6EA60847-AEFE-4A4D-B50D-B90A88AA17EA.jpeg

Is this in north myrtle? Looks like it could be a Phoenix dactylifera (second pic).

Edited by DAVEinMB
Clarification

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NC_Palms

I have to disagree. CIDPs are commonly planted much farther north of Jacksonville. They are super common here in the SC Lowcountry, as well as in coastal Georgia. Phoenix dactylifera and Phoenix sylvestris are also common here as well.  I have also seen a few Phoenix roebelenii on Hilton Head that have been there for decades. 

The northernmost planted CIDPs on the East Coast are in Eastern North Carolina. 

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DAVEinMB
7 hours ago, NC_Palms said:

I have to disagree. CIDPs are commonly planted much farther north of Jacksonville. They are super common here in the SC Lowcountry, as well as in coastal Georgia. Phoenix dactylifera and Phoenix sylvestris are also common here as well.  I have also seen a few Phoenix roebelenii on Hilton Head that have been there for decades. 

The northernmost planted CIDPs on the East Coast are in Eastern North Carolina. 

Once you get to Charleston you start seeing more of them but along the coast of northeast SC there definitely aren't enough CIDP plantings to be considered common. However, they aren't incredibly rare either. I suppose they'd fall into the refreshing category; they break up the monotony of the overwhelming amount of sabals. We share a similar climate to some southern portions of the NC coast so I imagine the appearance and health of them is also similar. There are some really beautiful specimens but there are just as many that don't look happy at all. 

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Palmobsessed
On 9/18/2019 at 11:36 PM, NC_Palms said:

I have to disagree. CIDPs are commonly planted much farther north of Jacksonville. They are super common here in the SC Lowcountry, as well as in coastal Georgia. Phoenix dactylifera and Phoenix sylvestris are also common here as well.  I have also seen a few Phoenix roebelenii on Hilton Head that have been there for decades. 

The northernmost planted CIDPs on the East Coast are in Eastern North Carolina. 

I just don’t see them anywhere near as commonly as Palmetto’s in Myrtle Beach area. Rare enough that I freak and take a photo lol. Thats cool though 

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Palmobsessed
On 9/19/2019 at 7:05 AM, DAVEinMB said:

Once you get to Charleston you start seeing more of them but along the coast of northeast SC there definitely aren't enough CIDP plantings to be considered common. However, they aren't incredibly rare either. I suppose they'd fall into the refreshing category; they break up the monotony of the overwhelming amount of sabals. We share a similar climate to some southern portions of the NC coast so I imagine the appearance and health of them is also similar. There are some really beautiful specimens but there are just as many that don't look happy at all. 

Truer words never been spoken

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Palmobsessed
On 9/18/2019 at 9:32 PM, DAVEinMB said:

Is this in north myrtle? Looks like it could be a Phoenix dactylifera (second pic).

Yeah North Myrtle. Awesome! Thanks. 

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