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North Central FL Coconuts

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Eric in Orlando

I saw the New Smyrna Beach Coconuts today. I didn't get a pic of the Flagler Ave. specimen by the beach but it looks good and is developing a nice trunk. Those tall ones planted a couple years ago at that new beachside mansion also look good. I got a pic from the side where they are doing some work. Theres more on the other side in the back not visible from this side.

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Eric in Orlando

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Reeverse

The Daytona Beach Shores pre 2010 ones are doing good as well. I'll get a pic tomorow. 

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Eric in Orlando

Here is my 4 year old 'Green Malayan' coconut growing in Altamonte Springs. It is growing in a spot that stays wet and is growing in between my small clumps of 'Ice Cream' bananas and 'Saba' plantains. It is about 6-7ft overall and has survived 27F a couple years ago. This came from a coconut from Jupiter. Our former Great Dane loved to carry and chew on coconuts so we had a pile for her. One sprouted so stuck it over in the banana patch. It should really gain some size this summer.

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Bill H2DB

  Here's pics of the Ormond By the Sea Cocos taken last Sunday .  These were planted in 2017 , and were quite defoliated in 17-18 Winter , but the warmth since then has done them well .

 

49802225972_be53a5c15d_c.jpgIMG_1224 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

49801918931_c4140f7a65_c.jpgIMG_1223 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

 

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NickJames
On 4/21/2020 at 10:56 AM, Bill H2DB said:

  Here's pics of the Ormond By the Sea Cocos taken last Sunday .  These were planted in 2017 , and were quite defoliated in 17-18 Winter , but the warmth since then has done them well .

 

49802225972_be53a5c15d_c.jpgIMG_1224 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

49801918931_c4140f7a65_c.jpgIMG_1223 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

 

You inspired me to drive by today and take my own photo. They look great!

1C8011C2-7F21-48E4-88D1-727EFEA98356.jpeg

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Reeverse
46 minutes ago, NickJames said:

You inspired me to drive by today and take my own photo. They look great!

1C8011C2-7F21-48E4-88D1-727EFEA98356.jpeg

Check out The Tropical manor hotel on beachside in Daytona Beach shores. There is a huge pre 2010 coconut and there is another on Dahlia ave by the Sunglow pier that survived the 2010 winter. There is hope ha!

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NickJames
27 minutes ago, Reeverse said:

Check out The Tropical manor hotel on beachside in Daytona Beach shores. There is a huge pre 2010 coconut and there is another on Dahlia ave by the Sunglow pier that survived the 2010 winter. There is hope ha!

Can you send hope to LPGA Blvd? LOL. Perhaps now that my backyard is fairly well insulated, I stand a chance!? The dypsis lutescens can take the hit! Ha ha

CCA5B6A1-8C4E-4A01-966F-322AD6321FA9.jpeg

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Reeverse

Looks Awesome Nick 

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PalmTreeDude

Are coconuts starting to become more popular in North Central Florida? I like it! 

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kinzyjr
40 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Are coconuts starting to become more popular in North Central Florida? I like it! 

They were always popular, but with the recent trend of milder winters, they are now surviving long enough to warrant landscape use in the milder microclimates on the coast and in urban areas.  The 2010 survivors noted on the Remarkable Palms of Tampa Bay and Zone 10 Palms In The Orlando Area Mega Thread probably have helped mainstream efforts to plant them in marginal climates, and the fact that a few survived 2010 in Daytona Beach provide evidence that it can be done long term in the proper microclimates.

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NickJames
4 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Are coconuts starting to become more popular in North Central Florida? I like it! 

Perhaps with another hope and prayers!? 

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ck_in_fla
4 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

They were always popular, but with the recent trend of milder winters, they are now surviving long enough to warrant landscape use in the milder microclimates on the coast and in urban areas.  The 2010 survivors noted on the Remarkable Palms of Tampa Bay and Zone 10 Palms In The Orlando Area Mega Thread probably have helped mainstream efforts to plant them in marginal climates, and the fact that a few survived 2010 in Daytona Beach provide evidence that it can be done long term in the proper microclimates.

The two I had in pots for several years just went into the ground.  It never got cold enough this past winter here in Winter Springs to even think about bringing them into the garage.  So, I put both of them into the ground this past weekend.

One is your everyday Coconut palm from Home Depot.  The other I bought as a sprouted nut on eBay as an "Atlantic Tall" variety.  So, it will be interesting to watch them as they grow.  While they are small, if we get any marginal winter nights, I may throw blankets over them.  But, I'm past all the elaborate protection schemes I used years ago.  :-)

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Eric in Orlando

I posted this in another thread but thought it would be appropriate here too. Here is an old photo of downtown Orlando, in 1972. It is looking north up Orange Ave. (now East West Expressway yet). In the bottom left is Lucerne Tower on the south side of Lake Lucerne. It is an appx. 10 story U-shaped building that faces south. In the center of the U is an old Royal Palm. That palm survived the 12/83 and 1/85 freezes. But sometime around 1987 it died (before the 12/89 freeze).  In this photo it appears there is also a tall Coconut on the far left. I don't remember it being there for the '83 freeze, probably killed in the 1977 freeze. But maybe it was. That U shape facing south really gave it a great microclimate. Besides the Royal there were Queen and Pygmy Date Palms that survived with no damage after the '80s freezes. Also mature Schefflera and Crotons. Its recently been remodeled into apartments or something and relandscaped with the same sterile, no imagination landscape seen downtown without taking advantage of a great microclimate.

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Eric in Orlando

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