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Mohsen

Plams around Sydney

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Mohsen

As my job , I need to drive in different locations in/around Sydney...

If I see any interesting Palm , I will post it here...

I hope you find some of them interested ,,,

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Mohsen

I saw these 2 Dypsis decaryi , there were one very big established one in the back yard but I couldn't take any photo

triangle.JPG

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Mohsen

is this a Ravenea rivularis I saw yesterday?

Majestic.JPG

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Pal Meir

Have you already visited Hyde Park? Here e.g. a Butia sp.:

Butia_Sydney_1979-07-29.thumb.jpg.56dbd7

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Mohsen

Look at theses Australian white ibis and their nests over CIDPs,,,
took it while waiting in traffic...

 

IMG_3009(2).JPG

IMG_3008(1).JPG

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Mohsen

Have you already visited Hyde Park? Here e.g. a Butia sp.:

Butia_Sydney_1979-07-29.thumb.jpg.56dbd7

I have been there but didn't notice any palms ( before my Palm area :))...I will revisit again...I have seen many I think Butia capitata all around Sydney though...

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Mohsen

In Palmland Nursery ...Last Friday ...been told the below one is Butia capitata but dont know why is green?

pl1.JPG

pl2.JPG

Edited by Mohsen

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doranakandawatta

OMG!

Did you fill all the space of your car when you left Palmland?

Is Licuala elegans actually L. grandis?

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Mohsen

OMG!

Did you fill all the space of your car when you left Palmland?

Is Licuala elegans actually L. grandis?

I only bought one Trachycarpus fortunei and one chamaedorea atrovirens...many others like  "Licuala elegans" , "Licuala ramsayi ","Butia capitata" ( which I dont know why was green ) and "Beccariophoenix alfredii"were very  expensive ( more than $130.00) for the smallest size :(

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Pal Meir

OMG!

Did you fill all the space of your car when you left Palmland?

Is Licuala elegans actually L. grandis?

I only bought one Trachycarpus fortunei and one chamaedorea atrovirens...many others like  "Licuala elegans" , "Licuala ramsayi ","Butia capitata" ( which I dont know why was green ) and "Beccariophoenix alfredii"were very  expensive ( more than $130.00) for the smallest size :(

Can you post a pic of the "Ch. atrovirens" in your "my own palms" thread? It is likely to be Ch. cataractarum. – The yellow leaves of the Butia capitata/odorata may come from pH problems in the soil or other deficiencies.

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Mohsen

OMG!

Did you fill all the space of your car when you left Palmland?

Is Licuala elegans actually L. grandis?

I only bought one Trachycarpus fortunei and one chamaedorea atrovirens...many others like  "Licuala elegans" , "Licuala ramsayi ","Butia capitata" ( which I dont know why was green ) and "Beccariophoenix alfredii"were very  expensive ( more than $130.00) for the smallest size :(

Can you post a pic of the "Ch. atrovirens" in your "my own palms" thread? It is likely to be Ch. cataractarum. – The yellow leaves of the Butia capitata/odorata may come from pH problems in the soil or other deficiencies.

pal,

I have already posted a photo of Ch. atrovirens,

there

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Pal Meir

Oh, sorry, I saw only the Trachy;) Indeed, your Chamaedorea is Ch. cataractarum.

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John Case

OMG!

Did you fill all the space of your car when you left Palmland?

Is Licuala elegans actually L. grandis?

I only bought one Trachycarpus fortunei and one chamaedorea atrovirens...many others like  "Licuala elegans" , "Licuala ramsayi ","Butia capitata" ( which I dont know why was green ) and "Beccariophoenix alfredii"were very  expensive ( more than $130.00) for the smallest size :(

Most L.elegans sold are really L. peltata v. sumawonga

 

 

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Josh-O

Mohsen, those licuala's are nicely grown. jump-on those !!

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Mohsen

Mohsen, those licuala's are nicely grown. jump-on those !!

Josh

I wanted to, but smallest size was $150.00 :(

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doranakandawatta

OMG!

Did you fill all the space of your car when you left Palmland?

Is Licuala elegans actually L. grandis?

I only bought one Trachycarpus fortunei and one chamaedorea atrovirens...many others like  "Licuala elegans" , "Licuala ramsayi ","Butia capitata" ( which I dont know why was green ) and "Beccariophoenix alfredii"were very  expensive ( more than $130.00) for the smallest size :(

Most L.elegans sold are really L. peltata v. sumawonga

 

 

Are the Licuala we see on the picture L. peltata sumawongii?

If so, they can be $150.00 since they are already big

If they are Licuala grandis, easier and faster species, it's expensive.

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John Case

OMG!

Did you fill all the space of your car when you left Palmland?

Is Licuala elegans actually L. grandis?

I only bought one Trachycarpus fortunei and one chamaedorea atrovirens...many others like  "Licuala elegans" , "Licuala ramsayi ","Butia capitata" ( which I dont know why was green ) and "Beccariophoenix alfredii"were very  expensive ( more than $130.00) for the smallest size :(

Most L.elegans sold are really L. peltata v. sumawonga

 

 

Are the Licuala we see on the picture L. peltata sumawongii?

If so, they can be $150.00 since they are already big

If they are Licuala grandis, easier and faster species, it's expensive.

I just report the news......based on how they look, I am not certain; I would find a Licuala expert to be certain.

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Mohsen

Oh, sorry, I saw only the Trachy;) Indeed, your Chamaedorea is Ch. cataractarum.

The tag says "chamaedorea atrovirens" what is the differences? can they get full sun? at the moment I keep it inside.

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gtsteve

Mate, I have seen 'Chamaedorea atrovirens' labels all over Sydney for years, but it is an obsolete name, an old Synonym, it has been reclassified to "cataractarum" now, but nurseries   .are still getting rid of their old tags. The same plant is now called Ch. cataractarum.

Edited by gtsteve
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gyuseppe

Oh, sorry, I saw only the Trachy;) Indeed, your Chamaedorea is Ch. cataractarum.

The tag says "chamaedorea atrovirens" what is the differences? can they get full sun? at the moment I keep it inside.

chamaedorea cataractarum easy to grow, not in full sun,  is better  more shade

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gtsteve

Actually my 3 clumps don't seem to mind full sun, but I am right on the coast, I can hear the waves on the rocks, and the plants are right up against the northern fence, so they are fairly protected but are growing happily over the 7' fence, but I keep the water up to them.

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Mohsen

Thanks guys for the clarification...are they suitable to be kept as indoor houseplants ( like Chamaedorea Elegans) ?

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gyuseppe

yes can grow indoors, but outside  is better, if you have more plants, having male and female, they can also produce seeds

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Mohsen

Today while I was walking in the neighbor I noticed these Archontophoenix alexandrae and Archontopheonix cunninghamiana...

I think the Archontophoenix alexandrae are thicker and also greener in crownshaft , please correct me if I am wrong...

These are most common palms around here after Syagrus romanzoffiana...

FullSizeRender(4).jpg

FullSizeRender(3).jpg

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PalmnutVN

Oh myyy!!! I sometimes wish I could start my own palm nursery. Palms are ridiculously cheap here with the aforementioned L.grandis as an example going for around 60,000 VND (about $3 US) for a plant of a similar size.....

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Ben in Norcal

I see A. cunninghamiana for sure.  In the first pic, it looks like the palm furthest on the left might be a Howea?  Hard to tell.

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Pal Meir

I see A. cunninghamiana for sure.  In the first pic, it looks like the palm furthest on the left might be a Howea?  Hard to tell.

You are right: It is Howea forsteriana :greenthumb:

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doranakandawatta

Oh myyy!!! I sometimes wish I could start my own palm nursery. Palms are ridiculously cheap here with the aforementioned L.grandis as an example going for around 60,000 VND (about $3 US) for a plant of a similar size.....

So do I wish in Sri Lanka, but very few gardeners or even less owners are interested by other the common species .

What is the size you mention for Licuala grandis at $3 US?

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Stelios

All Archontophoenix are beautiful. No matter how common they might become I can never get tired of them. I think there is also a nice size Ravenea rivularis in the first photo. 

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Mohsen

All Archontophoenix are beautiful. No matter how common they might become I can never get tired of them. I think there is also a nice size Ravenea rivularis in the first photo. 

I couldn't find Ravenea rivularis in the first photo?

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Mohsen

Today I was walking around and saw this nice Cycad , i don't know the type though...

IMG_3105.JPG

IMG_3104.JPG

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Stelios

I might be wrong but the one which I marked around with red looks like a Ravenea Rivularis. It looks like a well grown too! Very good find. The same with the Cycad.

FullSizeRender1(4).jpg

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Pip

I'd agree with Stelios there does appear to be a Ravenea rivularis and a Howea forsteriana  amongst those Archontopheonix. It is a very typical palm garden found in Sydney or Adelaide maybe Melbourne too.

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Mohsen

Thanks Pip...Now I noticed, that is a Ravenea rivularis for sure with thicker trunk and fatter at lower,,,

Is it Ravenea rivularis in my 2nd photo from top of this page too?

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Pip

Thanks Pip...Now I noticed, that is a Ravenea rivularis for sure with thicker trunk and fatter at lower,,,

Is it Ravenea rivularis in my 2nd photo from top of this page too?

Yes and it looks very healthy. 

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Mohsen

I also saw CIDP and a young one ( I am not sure if that is CIDP too or not)

 

 

IMG_3108.JPG

IMG_3107.JPG

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Daryl

I'd say all of the Archontophoenix in that photo are A.cunninghamiana. Definitely a Howea and Ravenea there too.

The Cycad looks to be Lepidozamia peroffskyana

 

regards,

Daryl

 

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