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PalmatierMeg

Huge Archonotophoenix with pink inflorescense - Species?

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PalmatierMeg

I planted this Archo 5 or so years ago. It has grown to be a monster - largest and fattest by far than any other Archo I have. This year it put out its first inlforescense and that's pink. Which Archo has pink flowers?

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post-1349-0-40683500-1436567828_thumb.jp

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Daryl

Meg, this is Archontophoenix cunninghamiana

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Steve the palmreader

A nice King !

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Tropicgardener

Yes it is an Archontophoenix cunninghamiana, Piccabeen Palm.

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NorCalKing

Sweet!

I can only hope my 11 gal I planted this year looks as nice some day :yay:

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PalmatierMeg

I have other picabeens but they are only half the diameter as this one

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Jim in Los Altos

I have other picabeens but they are only half the diameter as this one

Meg, A. cunninghamiana are very variable. Some of my mature ones are skinny and some rival royal palm trunk diameters at 24".

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DoomsDave

A big thing King

Some do get big.

Some get REALLY huge.

Other Archies, too, like purpurea.

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Daryl

You're correct Dave, the biggest of all is A.purpurea. All Archontophoenix can get very large, but I have never seen any of the size I saw at Mt Lewis...they were huge, magnificent palms. Give them constant cool and rainy/misty conditions like the top of Mt Lewis and they thrive.

Getting back to Meg's A.cunninghamiana, the species has a natural range of over 2000km or 1250 miles approx. That's about the same as Miami to New York. As you can imagine, there is a huge range of climates and soils etc, plus countless opportunities for them to naturally vary. Some have purple crownshafts, some brown, some bright green, and everything in between...some are larger or stockier, some have different leaf forms, some have broad leaflets and some have narrow. Some of this can be attributed to their growing conditions, but a lot is due to genetic variation of the species. Looks like you have yourself a lovely palm!

Daryl

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peachy

I bought a bangalow (cunninghamia) a few years ago for the simple reason that although they are very common, I didnt have one. Mine grew like a rocket and is a big fatty too. It gets the pinkish flowers also. It inspired me to try a couple more, but they were ratty little things that didnt thrive. It must be a genetic thing. You were lucky Meg to get a sturdy one.

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dalmatiansoap

Nice plant! I need one like that!

:greenthumb:

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