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jfrye01@live.com

Pushing palms way outside their zones...

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jfrye01@live.com

Hello, I am somewhat new to growing palms. As many of you know from my other posts, I live near Wichita, Kansas (some sources state zone 6, others zone 7), but the harsh reality is, this is Kansas, and it does get cold here. I have the usual zone 6-7 palms (Trachycarpus, sabal minor), but I also have some Washingtonia robusta, washingtonia filifera, butia, and others. I have had others tell me they have tried these palms in zone 6 and even zone 5 with success, with heavy protection, however, my question is, has anyone here tried something insane, such as growing zone 9-10 palms in zone 7-8? I'm just curious, as I think the coolest part of this hobby is doing something most wouldn't expect! :) Of course, I wouldn't expect zone 9-10 palms to even come close to surviving here, even with protection, I'm just wondering what you all have accomplished that seemed impossible...

-Jacob in Kansas

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Alicehunter2000

Something very small like C. radicalis trunking form or C. microspadix....would be very easy to protect these. Another idea would be to pot grow something like Caryota and bring it in in the winter. Caryota does very well for me inside for 6 months....then back out in the spring. Think about palms that grow super slow like C. macrocarpa (Flame thrower)....these would probably do really well in a big pot or even in the ground...but you would have to protect with heaters or bring inside in winter. This should do well with low light levels for a few months. You should really think about stuff you can either bring inside or bring inside a heated greenhouse in the winter. I

In summer you can put the pots into the ground and just dig them back out when winter comes around. According to how tall your ceilings are you can grow quite large palms if you have a good palm dolly and space to put it inside during winter.

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MKIVRYAN

I may have posted this in one of your other threads but You can also try planting things in the ground in the pots then pull them up when it gets cold. Move them inside or if your really gonna get crazy with palms build a heavily insulated shed with glass top or grow lights and heat it. This option would be more upfront cost but will be cheaper to heat long term than a poorly insulated greenhouse and will be stronger against wind. I have about 50-75 plants and palms from 1-20G that I pull up and move into my greenhouse. Just have to make sure roots don't grow out the drain holes while they are in the ground. I think you will find it's easier to protect everyone together than to have numerous small enclosures.

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MKIVRYAN

I'm a pretty firm believer that you can grow just about anything anywhere if time and money are not a concern. I know you have posted about a coconut in Kansas. I think you could do it. Plant it in the ground with lots of heating cables and in the winter put a removable shed around it with heavy heating and lighting. It would need a back up generator just in case. You could do this and it would probably work. Would it be worth the time and cost involved? Probably not. You just need to decide how far your willing to go to grow your palms. Would be cheaper to plant and pull like I explained above. Your young and will be able to wrestle around big palms for a while.

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Brahea Axel

You could get a big dome and put it over your garden...

You're sliding down a slippery slope, the bottom of which is gonna be either California, Hawaii or Florida. But if you can't wait until you move, the only way you can grow the more tender 9b palms is with a heated greenhouse or in pots that you overwinter in a heated place where there's enough light, like a garage with growing lights. Unlike the trachy and its hardy companions, the more tender upper 9b/10a palms need Winter light and heat to survive.

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Zeeth

You know, you can get land pretty cheap in some places in Florida. You could always buy a cheap plot with water connected, and hook up irrigation and plant whatever you want. Pine island would be a good place for that.

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willials

You could also build a mini stadium (much like baseball teams use but obviously much smaller) with a retractable roof. I have thought about makeshift ways of doing this, but it would require quite a bit of money and a large piece of land without a lot of building restrictions. Although you're probably better off doing what Zeeth said and buying a cheap piece of land in Florida or Texas (I'm not aware of much cheap land for sale in California or Hawaii).

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Zeeth

You could also build a mini stadium (much like baseball teams use but obviously much smaller) with a retractable roof. I have thought about makeshift ways of doing this, but it would require quite a bit of money and a large piece of land without a lot of building restrictions. Although you're probably better off doing what Zeeth said and buying a cheap piece of land in Florida or Texas (I'm not aware of much cheap land for sale in California or Hawaii).

There is actually some relatively cheap land in Hawaii, but the problem with that is that you have the expense of transport when you want to see/plant your plants, as you can't just make a road trip to do it.

Here is one example, http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/Seadrift-Rd-Pahoa-HI-96778/533908_zpid/

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Hammer

Whatever you attempt to grow in Kansas, I suggest you follow Alicehunter2000's advice...the slower growing it is the better. It will save you lots of money and heartache.

Axel and Zeeth are right too. Start packing your bags for a warmer climate. It's gonna happen. Save your pennies and you'll have more to spend on land and palms once you move. :)

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jfrye01@live.com

Haha I appreciate all the replies and advice, but I wasn't asking because I'm trying to do this myself, I was simply curious what others have done;) Not neccesarily in my zone, but pushing way outside their own zone, whether that be zone 5, 8, 9, or wherever you are.

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Jimhardy

I think if there was one palm I would go all in for,it would have to be a Bizzy!

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Hammer

Jimhardy's back!!! Hey Jim, got any pictures of the garden this spring. I always love seeing what you're up to.

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Brad Mondel

I agree, a bizzie planted anywhere out of the norm would be a shock to anyone who noticed it. I need to buy one and try it if I ever come across any.

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jfrye01@live.com

I think if there was one palm I would go all in for,it would have to be a Bizzy!

Oooh...those are gorgeous!

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Jimhardy

Pic of the Washy from 5/16.

4 leaves grown in the protection this winter/spring,the emerging spear is #7

Some of the leaves(first 4 or so)are a little weak from -essentially- growing in a g-house,

one is even laying on the ground in front but its open for business.

100_9300_zps3030ba2d.jpg

Edited by Jimhardy

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fr8train

Looks good :greenthumb:

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jfrye01@live.com

Beautiful!! How old is that Washy?

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blake_tx

Not pushing way out of my zone, just trying things one zone up. I'm in 8b, trying acrocomia totai, Brahea nitida, allagoptera areniana, and a good amount of cycads.( survived so far!) plan on getting a acoelorraphe wrightii, parajubaea microcarpa, and dypsis decipiens soon to try as well.

Jason do you have any needle palms? I would think those would do the best for you. I would also consider trithrinax (campestris and acanthacoma), sabal mexicana, and sabal brazoria. I think those might have a chance there, all are very hardy, hardier than trachys in my experiences.

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Tropicdoc

I have gotten heliconias to flower in 9a. I put up a spring gardener greenhouse over the bed for winter and put a little space heater inside. The electric bill is quite high, though.

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Tropicdoc

Oh yeah, and I have six potted coconuts using the same method. There is a guy on palmtalk with some sort of adonidia or something in New York.

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