Jump to content
palm tree man

Which species can still be germinated even from older seeds?

Recommended Posts

palm tree man

I know many of us have gotten seed whether it was from a broker or a kind and generous friend. Life sometimes happen and we don't get to germinate those seeds. This brings the question to mind, which species are worth attempting to germinate when older and which are simply not. We all know the 24 hour soaking trick in water with a small amount of bleach and to scare some seeds, but which species simply keep there viability longer? Date palms for example have been germinated from seed thousands of years old. Mazari palms are slow to germinate but because of their habitat tend to be viable much longer. Other desert or seasonally dry habitat palms are very similar. I myself have thousands of seeds that are four years old and have asked this very question many times, "am I wasting my time and precious resources trying to germinate these seeds" plain and simple.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

Some palms take like 5 years to germinate, such as Acrocomia. Many germinate in the compost pile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palm tree man

I have had that problem with Jubaea and Parajubaea as well. Thanks Dave! I love the profile pic by the way; yaba daba dooooooooooo!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

I say stick them in community pots and see what pops up.....what do you have to lose?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palm tree man

At this point they have been paid for for four years, so absolutely nothing! lol I might ground plant some as well on the floor of the greenhouse; all my plants are moving out of there for the spring and summer anyway. I have a few different Brahea; I think that they will be ok. Dypsis Scottiana and Prestonia, I am doubtful about being as old as they currently are. I have already put 500 each of Syagrus Rom "silver queen", dypsis ambositrae, phonenix loureiroi var loureiroi might be ok if they are like common date palms. Anyway, thanks guys for the input. Should I scar the seeds or crack any shells, etc. ?

Edited by palm tree man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phoenikakias

I know many of us have gotten seed whether it was from a broker or a kind and generous friend. Life sometimes happen and we don't get to germinate those seeds. This brings the question to mind, which species are worth attempting to germinate when older and which are simply not. We all know the 24 hour soaking trick in water with a small amount of bleach and to scare some seeds, but which species simply keep there viability longer? Date palms for example have been germinated from seed thousands of years old. Mazari palms are slow to germinate but because of their habitat tend to be viable much longer. Other desert or seasonally dry habitat palms are very similar. I myself have thousands of seeds that are four years old and have asked this very question many times, "am I wasting my time and precious resources trying to germinate these seeds" plain and simple.

I have managed to bring to germinaton seeds in dried up fruits of Hyphaena thebaica, sold for tea making.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Hey Daniel, you wouldn't happen to have any Brahea clara "icy blue" would you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

Jubes sprout quickly if you heat them up. I used a heating pad . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palm tree man

I have Armata, Clara, and Super Silver. I might have Edulis or some others as well. There is still one bag that I have not opened yet. Super Silver has never been damaged at my location do to any cold weather. It appears to be pretty hardy and can also handle our humidity fairly well too which surprised me a little. A heating pad has worked wonders in the past and so has placing the baggies on top of the fridge or dryer. I had eight out of ten jubaeopsis caffra germinate about eight years ago.

Edited by palm tree man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NorthFlpalmguy

I have old germination beds that I know for sure have butia capitata seeds that germinated 2-3 years after I sowed the seeds. They are known for it but I would try and plant any old seeds I had.

Edited by bbrantley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palm tree man

I am going to plant them all and use several different methods and see what works best with each species. As far as I know, no real study has been done on this intentionally anyway. It has become a necessity for me because I have many seeds in storage that have a ticking shelf life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bigfish

This is a great question. I have hundreds of Rhapidophyllum hystrix seeds that I collected about 3 years ago that I never got around to germinating. I've left them outside, in the shade, in the elements. I would assume they would probably mostly be no good anymore, but I'm going to stick them in pots this year anyways and see if I get a few sprouts. I also have thousands of seeds of other species in bags that have been in storage for over 5 years that I probably need to do something with, LOL.

Edited by Frank - Knoxville

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palm tree man

Me too it wasn't by choice but by circumstances. I thought only desert or species that were from harsher environments would keep for a few years but my first to start has been dypsis prestoniana. Float them and soak them and plant them is what I say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • Marc
      By Marc
      This post is simply a suggestion for the site.  I am an amateur (home grower) that monitors the for sale/trade category, and one of the things I find annoying is that someone selling a palm will specify local pickup only.  Of course, that's quite reasonable from their perspective, but not really an option for me unless that person is located in northern california (unfortunately for me, 99.8% of these posts are in any one of a number of southern california communities, any one of a number of florida communities or texas) - as a practical matter, these communities are not accessible to each other as well - the problem then gets exacerbated when a grower (typically commercial grower) uses the forum as a product list with one entry for each type of their 47 palm species for sale (i.e., all for local pickup).  The effect from my perspective when there are a sufficient number of these posts is that it converts the category into a regional topic only, with subject matter unavailable to me (and others).  My suggestion is simply that under the topic for sale/trade that there be separated categories for local pickup only (perhaps for tags by region) and for sale via mail.
       
    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      I have two seeding Sabal minors on the edge of my Garden Lot. I grew them from seeds sent to me by a PTer who collected them about 10 years ago from a Sabal in Savannah, GA. He thought they might be a dwarfed variety of Sabal minor but I am not sure of that. Each palm is about 4' wide by 4' tall and is seeding. Is there any interest in these seeds from US PTers? I plan to send them uncleaned. Let me know soon as I plan to cut/compost them if no one wants them.
      Sabal minor Savannah #1

      Sabal minor Savannah #2

    • UK_Palms
      By UK_Palms
      A few from Weymouth on the south coast of England...






       
    • Zoltan
      By Zoltan
      I see some people say Dypsis Lucentes usda zone 10 and up.I disasagree with that at least here in Florida.
      In St Augustine by Aligator farm entrance you can see many of them.I talked to the zoo and they told me they planted them maybe 15 yrs ago as 5-7 gallons by now they are tall maybe 12 feet or more.You can see them from A1A. But also you see some in downtown around the belive or not.This is usda zone 9a .But if this is not enough,I live in Jacksonville at oceanway which is east of 95 ,we have on Pulaski rd zip code 32218 by church for minimum 10 yrs  about 10 -12 feet tall. planted right by entrance the wall.  And if this is still not enough at Jacksonville Airport at Hilton has at pool backside of the building w/o any protection beside it planted right by the building.So I think if you place it on sunny side and close to building it can tolarete all the way to Jacksonville. I don’t have any idea about 8b zone like west of Nort Florida or Ga …Also I know a person listed close to Jacksonville airport she planted a Dypsis decaying “ triangle palm “ back in 1990 right by her house.It’s made it eversince and it’s way taller than her house.She protected at beginning heat pad etc .She has some photo at palmtalk . I have 2 of them I never heated them ,but covered however I can’t cover anymore they are out of reach .Over 12 feet or so.I got them from Home Depot 3 or 4 years ago.Even leaves get touched they come back nicely.Mine not planted by house but by fence and it get early sun till late afternoon sun…

    • UK_Palms
      By UK_Palms
      So this glasshouse and garden is located about 10 miles northeast of my location, just on the outskirts of south London. It's a bit of a hidden gem, although not quite on Kew Garden's level...




















       
      A stunning Bismarckia Nobilis that must be at least 20 foot tall...


       
      Sabal Mexicana...




       
      Sabal Minor

       
      Brahea Armata...











       
      They've got some stuff growing outdoors as well...













×
×
  • Create New...