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cycadjungle

transplanting a double coconut tree

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cycadjungle

Alright,nobody laugh at me on this, because I have never heard of this being done, but has anyone in the world transplanted a double coconut? In about a month or so it is going to be moved as opposed to being bulldozed. Has anyone here dome it or heard of anyone someone else doing it that I could contact? I know the reasons why they are supposed to be virtually impossible to move but the people involved with the move are going to go to any extreme to make this happen. Thanks for any help on this. Tom

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Jerry@TreeZoo

I'm scared!

Tom,

Where is this, climate and zone and how big is it? It is possible that it might move with a little size to it but I have never heard of it being done. I bet Nong Nooch would have experience.

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Zeeth

I assume this is from the Young garden?

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Zeeth

At any rate, Ken Johnson is really the go-to person on this forum for transplanting palms. He is a valuable resource for this sort of thing, so I would definitely contact him first.

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cycadjungle

It is in Tampa. The ideas we have on moving this includes some bizarre tactics that include boxing the entire root system all the way down and including stem in the box. Stabilizing with commercial insulating foam and all kinds of things. The main man in charge has done things like moving large palms with helicopters and all kinds of stuff, so this guy is REALLY good. We just want to hear from someone who has actually done it to increase our knowledge on what has worked. If nobody has done it, we will be documenting the event with pictures and maybe even video,but all that aside, we just want to save the palm.The leaves are long but the stem just barely breaks the surface. Tom

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Funkthulhu

Just to be clear, we're talking about Lodoicea, right?

Who has one of these in the States who didn't plan ahead for eternity when they put it in the ground?

For the tree's sake I am crossing my fingers and hoping for success.

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Mandrew968

One thing this palm has going for it is that it is not in South Florida. The rock here would make it even harder to dig. I am sure where it is, the soil is pretty sandy and deep. I would look up any information on Lodoicea root development and even then it probably will not work... But it has to be tried and documenting the whole attempt is a great thing to do--GOOD LUCK!!!!

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Phoenikakias

It is in Tampa. The ideas we have on moving this includes some bizarre tactics that include boxing the entire root system all the way down and including stem in the box. Stabilizing with commercial insulating foam and all kinds of things. The main man in charge has done things like moving large palms with helicopters and all kinds of stuff, so this guy is REALLY good. We just want to hear from someone who has actually done it to increase our knowledge on what has worked. If nobody has done it, we will be documenting the event with pictures and maybe even video,but all that aside, we just want to save the palm.The leaves are long but the stem just barely breaks the surface. Tom

In Tampa Lodoicea maldivica??????????????????? :bemused:Is it growing outdoors?

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Ken Johnson

I know the story of this palm. It is "inside" a house. Yes, the Young house in Tampa. It is an unusual thing to say the least. The petioles are VERY stretched as they would be in deep shade. It does get some overhead UV but not much. It must be very fragile. If the mover could take the house with it it would be a good idea. That wont happen. When this palm is tipped on its side it better be already secure from gravity breaking it to bits. Where ever it goes it will need similar surroundings, at least at first.

OR...If you slowly box a reasonable amount of root and soil mass and start to add light ( remove cover on roof) now and start to trim weight off the leaves now you could reduce it in size and awkwardness while trying to induce both new roots and more importantly a new sun adapted leaf...just one would be enough. The final product of this could stay in a pot for a few years and be secured from cold while enjoying hot days outside, eventually. Once it is fully rooted again it will need another solution but that is a LONG way off... :excl:

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waykoolplantz

Might be worth a little K J consulting fee...get the perspective from the best

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DoomsDave

Well, whatever happens, take pictures and tell us.

We will all babble with delight . . . .

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Phil Stager

Yes, this is the UA Young coco de mer, and it is going to Sunken Gardens here in St. Pete. We either try to move it or watch it get bulldozed. Since it is in the same subtribe as Borasadendron, Borassus, and Latania, the root system may be quite similar and, more importantly, the reaction of the palm to having its roots disturbed may be similar. So if you have any experience in moving any of these three, let us know - esp the Borassadendron since we'll be moving one of these also.

onward through the fog ...

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Eric in Orlando

Dis Fairchild Gardens move a big Borassodendron for a construction project by the Rainforest ?

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Ken Johnson

I transplanted a small Borassus...about 45' tall... :innocent:

Do I get the job?

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DoomsDave

I transplanted a small Borassus...about 45' tall... :innocent:

Do I get the job?

Is that the monster that was at your house when I visited back in 2007?

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Mandrew968

I transplanted a small Borassus...about 45' tall... :innocent:

Do I get the job?

Is that the monster that was at your house when I visited back in 2007?

It is still there and even more monsterous :bemused:

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Brad-Tampa

The project to salvage as much as possible of the U.A. Young collection began in early April. To date over 500 large specimens of mostly cycads and select palms have been moved by the city of St. Petersburg. The majority of the plants have been transplanted to Kopsick Palm Arboretum. Due to the additional security and attention available, a substantial number of especially valuable or rare plants were added to Sunken Gardens, also in St. Pete. This amount does not include the numerous additional cuttings or plants of various aeroids, platyceriums and other ferns that were collected to add to the Sunken Gardens experience.

The staff at Sunken Gardens was ready to accept the most unique specimen, the Lodoicea that had been growing, slowly, in the atrium since planted as a seed in 1973 (For the story by Mel Sneed about collecting the seed that he sent to Dad see Principes Vol. 20 No. 1). The question was, could it be moved?

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Brad-Tampa

When it was apparent that I would not have to cover the atrium walls for another winter, I removed some of the atrium roof. The UV damage to the roof material had slowly decreased the amount of light in the atrium. I wanted to give the plant any boost I could before the move.

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Brad-Tampa

St. Pete hired Joe Morelli Landscaping for the garden transplant project. I cannot say enough about the absolutely incredible job Joe’s crew exhibited throughout the extended project. This was especially true with the concern, planning and attention to detail he gave to the Coco-de-Mer. It became a challenge for him. One he obviously took very serious and with considerable research and use of personal experience.

The first step was to dig completely around the sand ball that contained an unknown amount and size of root ball. The crew dug down through the natural sand substrate until they hit a hard pan layer. The ball was wrapped and tied with wet burlap.

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_Keith

I transplanted a small Borassus...about 45' tall... :innocent:

Do I get the job?

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Brad-Tampa

Nate Bowden, Kopsick volunteer

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The next day the adjacent Pinanga was removed and the Lodoicea root ball was wrapped in plastic with watering tubes inserted. A nutritive gel was added to fill in available air spaces, and the assembly was reinforced with industrial foam that hardens when applied.

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Brad-Tampa

The next step was to build the box sides

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Then the space was filled with more foam, a top and support boards spanning the atrium planter deck was added.

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Brad-Tampa

This support was used to brace the bottom boards that were dug out and added one at a time.

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Brad-Tampa

By the next day extra boards have been added to the support and the bottom of the box has been dug out and constructed. During the hand digging under the box, the crew did not encounter any roots extending down from the palm. The hard pan layer was present under about half of the box, with the other half consisting of a deeper layer of sand.

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Brad-Tampa

Since it was obvious that she was going to have to fly out of the atrium, the next step was to remove a section of the atrium roof.

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Next was the support needed for the fronds and emerging leaf.

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Brad-Tampa

Lift day. Phil Stager anxiously awaits the hook up.

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The protective tower is in place and the box is braced with straps.

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Brad-Tampa

Here comes the hook.

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The guys from Kelley Crane were great.

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Lifting straps supported the box from the bottom.

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Brad-Tampa

Tom adds the true north direction before the lift.

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Joe directs his operation from the pit.

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When the load is drawn tight the supports are cut

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Brad-Tampa

And the Lodoicea flies!

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The operator swings her between the Sabals and over the Raphis. The load was in excess of three tons.

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Left to right: Joe Morelli, Phil Stager, Lina Seufert (City of St. Petersburg), me, Nate Bowden and Tom St. Peter. Great Job!

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Brad-Tampa

The problem at this point was we were not really sure where it was going to end up. I was always concerned that although Sunken Gardens was committing to heating the palm if that infrequent freeze occurred, and with St. Pete being located on the Pinellas peninsula, it had a chance to avoid it. But this was not really a long term prospect considering the height and age this plant can attain. There were also concerns with the mucky soils. Too much effort had been expended to not give it a better chance to thrive. The botanical gardens in Miami were considered but there was concern about the soil properties there and there were no enthusiastic responses. In the meantime shade was erected.

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Brad-Tampa

For a day or two it appeared that the National Botanical Garden in Washington, D.C. was eager to accept the offer. However, after internal meetings, they graciously declined the palm due to scheduling conflicts and not being prepared to accept the responsibility for the care of this “valuable botanical specimen”.

So, when the location was finally determined she was braced and loaded up for the trip.

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Brad-Tampa

The destination was not Washington, where Goofy politicians perform Mickey Mouse operations.

No, my palm is moving to the Gaylord Palms Convention Center Atrium…………………….. in Orlando.

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There is an adjacent pool and overlooking hotel room balconies.

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Brad-Tampa

She has good company and a nearby bench.

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I wish her the best of luck.

If anyone stops by for a look, please update her status with us and tell the Marriot management how much you enjoy such an interesting and special palm.

Thanks,

Brad

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Sabal Steve

Awesome.

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Walter John

Thanks for this post, great to see all the work put in, congrats to all who were involved with it's transplant.

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tank

Man, I hope it makes it. Your pictures and text documenting the process are great. Glad I got to visit Dr. Youngs garden on a CFPACS outing.

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avanza

Very smooth thumbs up.

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Neil C

Well if that doesn't work nothing will. A costly and hopefully worthwhile exercise, wish that palm all the best.

Regards Neil

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Brad-Tampa

Let me correct a typo in the post with the group picture.

Linda Seufert was the representative of St. Petersburg Parks and Recreation (AKA "Mom"). She did a great job pulling off what turned out to be a very unique project, and then agreed that the best thing for St. Pete to promote the garden expansion story was for this palm to go to Gaylord Palms where it had a chance to trive and be enjoyed for hopefully many years to come.

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