Jump to content
Alberto

Syagrus oleracea, a pretty palm.

Recommended Posts

Alberto

I found this Syagrus oleracea growing in a garden in the county of Tibagi. I like the look of this palm with its slender trunk. Tibagi is located 80 km from my city , more northern location, and at lower altitude (750-850m) so ir´s warmer.

I saw also a mature king palm (A.cunninghamiana) growing in the same garden, so its not very cold there, but Syagrus oleracea must be a somewhat hardy palm. How much cold it can have? Do you know?

post-465-0-12617300-1367183140_thumb.jpg

post-465-0-54754800-1367186024_thumb.jpg

post-465-0-62389700-1367186198_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brahea Axel

I am growing it here, hardiness is supposed to be 28F but that's a conservative guess. I would lump it in with regular king palms in terms of hardiness, so 26F. I have one and the leaves feel tougher and more drought tolerant than Regular queen so I bet it's a tough plant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

F 26 is only -3.33ºC. Queen palms are certaibly a LOT hardier then this, Specially the southern tableland provenace is certainly hardier then the queens originated above the tropic line.

Thanks for answering! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brahea Axel

F 26 is only -3.33ºC. Queen palms are certaibly a LOT hardier then this, Specially the southern tableland provenace is certainly hardier then the queens originated above the tropic line.

Thanks for answering! :)

I think you mean king not queen. 26F is a conservative rating for reliable landscaping purposes. They will survive colder but look like crap, exactly like king palms, unless you have them under canopy, in which case they won't get damaged until 24-25F maybe.

However you rate kings, just think of syagrus oleracea as slightly more cold sensitive because you have to grow it in full sun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JEFF IN MODESTO

F 26 is only -3.33ºC. Queen palms are certaibly a LOT hardier then this, Specially the southern tableland provenace is certainly hardier then the queens originated above the tropic line.

Thanks for answering! :)

I think you mean king not queen. 26F is a conservative rating for reliable landscaping purposes. They will survive colder but look like crap, exactly like king palms, unless you have them under canopy, in which case they won't get damaged until 24-25F maybe.

However you rate kings, just think of syagrus oleracea as slightly more cold sensitive because you have to grow it in full sun.

Yup, I bought a couple from Floribunda, they survived 27f but looked like crap so into the compost pile they went.

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

OK!! You wrote "king" but read "queen". I misunderstood you....Sorry!

So you say the hardiness of S.oleracea is similar to a king palm (A. cunninghamiana) in your experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brahea Axel

OK!! You wrote "king" but read "queen". I misunderstood you....Sorry!

So you say the hardiness of S.oleracea is similar to a king palm (A. cunninghamiana) in your experience.

Slightly less hardy than a king, and you have to grow it fully exposed, so it will look like crap as Jeff noted if it gets down to 27F.

I recommend you get picrophylla instead, the lent coconut, it can take 25F or more, hardier than a king.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SanDimas

I recently purchased a G size of this as well.

I noticed the strap leaf starting to brown in full day sun.

Its in shade after 12pm and growing well.

I have the lent coconut/S.picrophylla as well.

The strap leaf is much tougher on these and have it growing in full day SoCAL sun.

Dark green leaf and not a trace of brown and just lovin the heat.

Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Germinator

I have a bunch of straplings here in Whittier. I will have to see how they manage. So far so good. Wish me luck.....I do not want them to end up in the compost heap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • tank
      By tank
      Its been awhile since I've posted a topic but here are some palm pics from my yard in Gainesville:
      Parajubaea cocoides x butia

       
      Trithrinax brasiliensis
       

       
      Trachycarpus principes
       

       
      Jubaea x Butia
       

    • donofriojim1
      By donofriojim1
      This next post is about more established needle palms in Cincinnati and Northern Ky. I also want to show how much microclimates in the same metropolitan area can effect growing palms. The first two pictures were shared with me by another local Cincinnati palm grower. This is the locally legendary needle palm planted in the year 2000 at Mount Saint Joseph University in Cincinnati during the freeze of January, 2019.  Since the year 2000, this palm has never received any special protection what so ever. It laughed off the vortex winters with ease. It even produced viable seed yearly. However, sadly in the spring of 2019, this beautiful palm was cut down by a landscape crew by mistake. However it is growing back slowly from the roots.  The second picture is the regrowth as of early March, 2020. No winter protection of new growth was ever given during the previous winter. I guy who shared these pictures with me online is the guy who originally planted this palm. 
      Now, I had lived for a couple of years in Boone co, Ky.  Paradoxically, a good chunk of Boone county, Kentucky actually tends to be noticeably colder than most parts of greater Cincinnati. Especially in the winter time.  In the town of Union, Kentucky one can find the Boone County Arboretum. It is a fantastic place for a garden lovers to visit. They have a locally famous stand of needle palm there as well. However due to their outlying location in the park, and Boone county being a local cold spot as well, these palms sadly struggle a lot more than other specimens north of the river despite receiving protective measures  that other local specimens do not receive.  The third picture is them protected for the winter in a cage of leaves. The forth picture is one I took of them in April, 2018 freshly uncovered and noticeably damaged. These are much more damaged than unprotected ones north of the river.  




    • donofriojim1
      By donofriojim1
      Hello all! I live in Cincinnati area and I have a great interest in hardy palms! I myself have planted needle palms and some sabal minor " McCurtain" in my own yard. I also have found some established needle palms planted in a restaurant parking lot. I spoke to the owner of the place and he said that they were planted in about 2009  and never receive winter protection. I am also aware that there is a needle palm that is growing back from the roots at Mt St Joseph University after being cut down by mistake last spring. It apparently was planted in the year 2000 and does not and has never received any special protective measures. I am also aware of some needle palms across the river in Boone county, Kentucky. I know that they are buried in leaves every year and they still appear to struggle much more than the unprotected specimens on the Ohio side of the river. It is probably a colder local microclimate. Attached are the sabal minor mc curtains, and needle palms in my yard, a sabal minor mc curtain seedling in my side yard exposed to all elements as of last December, and the established needle palms at a Cincinnati restaurant as of  late February of this year. Im curious, are there any other Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky palm growers here?








    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      As I posted earlier this week, I lost my large, mature Sabal palmetto Lisa to lingering damage from Hurricane Irma. But I still have two juvenile Sabal Lisas that I grew from seeds collected from a Ft. Myers city park. I have high hopes they will someday flower and set seeds like my first one. Here they are today.
      Sabal Lisa the larger

      Sabal Lisa the smaller

    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      Please join me in mourning the passing of my oldest and largest Sabal palmetto Lisa, which has provided many seeds and seedlings over the past 5 years. I received it as a 2-leaf seedling in May 2008 from a generous local PTer. It started flowering and setting seeds around 2014. I believe but can't prove that it suffered some kind of damage from Hurricane Irma in 2017. It aborted its seeds in 2018 and never flowered at all in 2019. By then it stopped growing and fronds died, starting with the newest. Today we gave up hope for it and cut it down. First photo is of what's left of its trunk. Second photo was taken 11 months ago when it still looked its best. I have two juvenile Sabal Lisas left on my garden lot.
      Sabal Lisa RIP, Cape Coral, FL  3/16/20

      Sabal Lisa, Cape Coral, FL 4/30/19

×
×
  • Create New...