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Kailua_Krish

Pushing the Zone in 9a

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Alberto

A closer look at whats in that planting bed, this is a great planting combo for central Florida understory if its wet enough

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And another plant that does well here if sited properly and with adequate water and rich soil, Ive filled open spaces in that bed with small ones of these i grew from stem cuttings

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Well thats all folks! No photos of the back this time.

I had a Phaius tankervillae in a pot some years ago. How cold hardy is it in ground?

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Alberto

Such a shame, they were hardier than the ubiquitous P. robelleni for me during the frigid 09-10 winter. I have a feeling they could be used much more in zone 9 if they were more readily available. Do they not make many seeds?

They produce little amount of seeds ...not to compare with a Butia or queen, but they germinate well and easily.

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Kailua_Krish

A closer look at whats in that planting bed, this is a great planting combo for central Florida understory if its wet enough

IMG_0126.jpg

And another plant that does well here if sited properly and with adequate water and rich soil, Ive filled open spaces in that bed with small ones of these i grew from stem cuttings

IMG_0125.jpg

Well thats all folks! No photos of the back this time.

I had a Phaius tankervillae in a pot some years ago. How cold hardy is it in ground?

It's been fine down cold enough for queens to defoliate in parts of my yard. The leaves were a little singed but it bloomed ok that year. The other Phaius species aren't as tolerant but still do well. I have Orchtoberfest and another large yellow flowered hybrid that blooms 2x a year.

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Kailua_Krish

I figured its probably time for an update. These weren't taken by me so I apologize for not focusing enough on the palms but it gives you an idea of whats growing in 9a after the last few winters. Pretty much nothing is protected.

General view of the front. Shown are (from left to right) Jubaea x Syagrus, P. canariensis, Butia x Parajubaea, Bismarkia, Butia x Syagrus, Tipuana tipu (there are other smaller things too)

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Kailua_Krish

Despite the weeds here is a segment I like. There is a mixture of Livistona chiniensis, saribus, and australis growing here with an understory of Alpinia zerumbet & galangal with also some Aspidistra & Cycads. There is some Arenga engleri in the background too.

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Kailua_Krish

Arenga micrantha, Tipuana tipu, lots of Curcuma 

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Kailua_Krish

A non-palmy but tropical understory

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Kailua_Krish

Some places are still works in progress

 

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Kailua_Krish

Bambusa chungii, BJxS, JxS, and bismarkia

 

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Kailua_Krish

My Parajubaea sunkha is finally getting some size to it. The Livistona nitida is growing at a snails pace

 

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Kailua_Krish

Always nice to have some flowers

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kinzyjr

@krishnaraoji88 That's a really nice job of landscaping!  There's some shade in most of those pictures.  That has to make the task of taking care of the property a lot easier.

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Matthew92
4 hours ago, krishnaraoji88 said:

I figured its probably time for an update. These weren't taken by me so I apologize for not focusing enough on the palms but it gives you an idea of whats growing in 9a after the last few winters. Pretty much nothing is protected.

General view of the front. Shown are (from left to right) Jubaea x Syagrus, P. canariensis, Butia x Parajubaea, Bismarkia, Butia x Syagrus, Tipuana tipu (there are other smaller things too.

 

So you were able to deal with the freezes in January pretty well? Do you still have your Dypsis decipiens?

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Kailua_Krish
2 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

@krishnaraoji88 That's a really nice job of landscaping!  There's some shade in most of those pictures.  That has to make the task of taking care of the property a lot easier.

The front is mostly under large oak trees but gets some direct sun during the day overhead. I didn't have any photos of the back but its much more sunny (no oak canopy so much more frost). I do have a rather large Silk Floss tree in the back though, no good pictures of it

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Kailua_Krish
1 hour ago, Opal92 said:

So you were able to deal with the freezes in January pretty well? Do you still have your Dypsis decipiens?

Still have my dypsis decipiens but no good pictures of it. Growing slowly but well. In Ocala the freezes weren't bad at all, we had bigger issues with flooding from the hurricane last year (the whole front yard was underwater for 5ish days)

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tank

Krishna,

Good to hear the A. micrantha is still kicking.

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Kailua_Krish
13 hours ago, tank said:

Krishna,

Good to hear the A. micrantha is still kicking.

All 3 are still doing well despite floods and freezes. Ocala seems to suit them well but they are slower than engleri

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Matthew92
On 10/16/2018, 9:59:13, krishnaraoji88 said:

Still have my dypsis decipiens but no good pictures of it. Growing slowly but well. In Ocala the freezes weren't bad at all, we had bigger issues with flooding from the hurricane last year (the whole front yard was underwater for 5ish days)

That's interesting- because I saw Washingtonias with brown leaves in Ocala this past March. They were in a more open area. Guess different areas felt it worse than other locations. 

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Kailua_Krish
2 hours ago, Opal92 said:

That's interesting- because I saw Washingtonias with brown leaves in Ocala this past March. They were in a more open area. Guess different areas felt it worse than other locations. 

Ocala has a wide range of climates due to its "hilliness", varying soil composition, and urbanization. The airport is consistently 5 degrees colder than where my house is which is in a semi-urban area with large oak canopy and thick loamy soil (seems to hold the heat better). Outside of really awful winters it probably doesnt get below 25 where Im at. As you can see from the pictures I have White Bird of Paradise and Phaius orchids outdoors that I don't protect. My neighbors have these too. Its my parents place so I only visit every year or two (I live in Hawaii) so the plantings have ground to a halt but I would have liked to try Archontophoenix as I think they would have survived.

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GaDawg
On 4/28/2013, 3:04:52, krishnaraoji88 said:

Thanks! I blended the southern style in because I wanted the yard to "fit in". Also, many of the old southern plants are favorites for a reason (they are survivors), even when we have devastating freezes again (like the 14 degrees Ocala got to before) the crinums, cast iron, shell gingers, ect will all come back in the spring and most of these could tolerate severe drought too. I'm lucky that my soil is a loamy clay mix in the front which allows me to grow plants without much fertilizer, it stays so wet violets overtook the St Augustine lawn in the front! The place always looks a bit messy once I go home though because I love dividing the plants and making the beds bigger, in the back I have a big fenced in cage full of palms and cycads that are waiting to be large enough to plant out!

 

One part of the southern landscape that I am slowly getting rid of are the azaleas. While they grow and flower well its a constant battle to keep the vines (smilax, virginia creeper, poison ivy to name a few) off of them. They are entirely too much work when planting shell ginger, crinums, and philodendrons makes a virtually carefree landscape!

I'll have to admit, in the southeast part of the country- especially near the coast- the southern style is naturally palms and evergreen trees (magnolia, live oak, camellia...). 

I, too, have attempted to blend more palms in my yard with a good mix of magnolia, live oak,cleyera, gardenia, azaleas and camellia. The understory plants I use have been leopard plant, cast iron, asiatic jasmine, philodendron, ginger, Crinum lily and aralia. The palms I've planted in my 8b/9a zone are European Fan palms, sabal palm, mule palm, robusta, Sylvestris, windmill and descent assortment of cycads. 

Im not really pushing my zone besides the Queen and sylvestris (which did remarkabaly well through the freak ice storm north Florida and southeast Georgia got).  

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RJ
On 10/16/2018, 4:09:11, krishnaraoji88 said:

Always nice to have some flowers

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What are the tall fern in the last picture? I don't know why but I have a thing for ferns but know nest to nothing about them other then that they generally like moisture and shade, 

Edited by RJ

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Kailua_Krish

Its an australian tree fern (Cyathea cooperi). I plant them as a quart size (roughly 5-7$ at big box stores) and enjoy them until the next bad freeze kills them. I have actually had one going since like 2008 but I did wrap it in xmas lights and blankets during the '10 freeze. They grow really rapidly so are nice additions to the shady landscape. Don't let them dry out though, Ive lost more from that than from the cold.

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Kailua_Krish

Some updates since I’m back in Florida for a few days. Most notable of the changes is to see all the plants and trees I lost from the floods. I lost Magnolia maclurei and veluntunia as well as a cinnamomum species. I lost all the cycads of Ceratozamia and encephalartos genus where it flooded but Cycas seemed to tolerate a week under water surprisingly well. Everything is really getting big particularly since no major freezes in the past few years. Feel free to post photo requests if interested. 

 

Jxs

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Kailua_Krish

PjxB0BFA8B09-D06D-4302-80FB-3F213F30CF3B.thumb.jpeg.2b30b75bd88adf27ec1f97e0ce51d571.jpeg

One of my many Mules

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Kailua_Krish

(BxJ)xS Tim hopper hybrid9710DD8C-9F1E-4DD5-B8BD-EA53CDA98A1D.thumb.jpeg.620422628f0ec3c3535b4898413ec449.jpeg

one of my 3 B alfredii

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Kailua_Krish

P sunkha

5796D0DF-F1E3-48D8-8AF4-891BB9D14291.thumb.jpeg.25729178ddb7daba189482617a040535.jpeg

Cycas debaoensis in a pool planter

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RJ

Looking great! That hopper hybrid looks fantastic, looks to be getting some clean trunk on it. 

 

 

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necturus

Awesome! Is that really PjxB or is it the other way around? Do you know if it's Pjc or Pjs?

Did you loose your Dypsis decipiens? Sad to hear about the other plants and especially the M. maclurei, I've been trying to find that one for a while now.

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Kailua_Krish

You’re right my mistake it’s BxPj and I don’t remember what species  it was from Patric in 2010

 

The Dypsis decipiens is fine. I’ll try to get a pic of it later. It actually tolerated the flooding fine but it was only flooded for like 2 days not over a week like some of the other parts 

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RJ

Did your "mountain giant" queen ever make it into the ground? 

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Kailua_Krish
23 minutes ago, RJ said:

Did your "mountain giant" queen ever make it into the ground? 

Yes it did. It looks like a regular queen right now but is still at the adolescent pre-trunking stage

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OC2Texaspalmlvr
1 hour ago, krishnaraoji88 said:

Yes it did. It looks like a regular queen right now but is still at the adolescent pre-trunking stage

Great looking garden and your J x S is a knock out specimen 

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Kailua_Krish

The D decipiens surrounded by weeds :blink2:

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My largest arenga micrantha

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Kailua_Krish

Kerriodoxa elegans has done well for me (the Chambeyronia that used to be here mostly died out)

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Another Beccariophoenix, this one with lots of competition from the adjacent oak tree

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Kailua_Krish

In the front C debaoensis and A micrantha and in the back what will eventually be a huge Tipuana tipu

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Bromeliads in trees are key for the tropical ambiance

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Kailua_Krish

Bamboo get bigger than you think they will

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But then again so do palms (I planted these as 3 gallons in 2010ish)A250957F-6565-4665-A493-4549652E6BBE.thumb.jpeg.6a594c743b62e5ed73afed069388514a.jpeg

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Kailua_Krish

You have to have large flowering trees (Silk Floss)

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but Sabals always feel at home (purchased as “Blackburniana”)

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Syagrus “mountain giant” isn’t so Giant yet

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RJ

That's it I'm moving further south! :rolleyes:

 

Outstanding job, it looks fantastic! Some day I'll get half way there, maybe :up: 

 

Edit: When did you plant that giant? 

Edited by RJ

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Kailua_Krish

Like 3 years ago. It’s in a dry area and had been transplanted

Dont underestimate the power of Oak canopy. The large amount of trees definitely insulates the area plus makes amazing soil with all the leaf drop 

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

How slow is A.Micrantha definitely a palm on my wish list. Speed of growth will determine how small i start off with =)

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