Jump to content
Kailua_Krish

Pushing the Zone in 9a

Recommended Posts

Kailua_Krish

Just thought I'd share a few photos of my yard in a low 9a North Florida. Sorry the photos arent the best but the lighting just wasnt working. Tell me what you think!

First are my two "those wont grow there" palms

Parajubaea sunkha

IMG_0174.jpg

Dypsis decipiens

IMG_0175.jpg

Attalea dubia foor good measure

IMG_0177.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Some tropical palms grown with careful siting. Some of these are protected with a heat lamp if the temp is forecast below 25. Kerriodoxa elegans, Chambeyronia macrocarpa, Lytocaryum, Beccariophoenix alfredii, Ceratozamia 'Molongo', C. radicalis, Lepidozamia p, and assorted bromeliads/tropicals.

IMG_0176.jpg

Large P. sylvestris (hybrids probably) with Bambusa chungii on the right

IMG_0181.jpg

Tropical border with Arenga engleri, P. selloum, and other tropicals

IMG_0182.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Now some cocoids

Jubaea x Syagrus, still sometimes has a bit of yellowing on portions of new frons, think this is from water getting in the crown when its cold. It should grow out of this

IMG_0178.jpg

Hopper Jubutyagrus, never a single problem with this one and its getting big...

IMG_0179.jpg

Syagrus 'abreojos', Have been trampled and mauled by the family dogs and still keep growing

IMG_0180.jpg

Edited by krishnaraoji88
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Now some bigger landscape photos

Butyagrus, Bismarkia, and Butia paraguayensis

IMG_0189.jpg

New bed I'm working on the left, filled with Crinum asiaticum, Magnolia maccleurei, and many small assorted tropicals

IMG_0185.jpg

A bed thats finished but plants need to grow, filled with L. chiniensis, Arenga ryukyuensis, B. alfredii, cycads, and Billbergia nutans hybrid

IMG_0183.jpg

Edited by krishnaraoji88
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

A closer look at whats in that planting bed, this is a great planting combo for central Florida understory if its wet enough

IMG_0126.jpg

And another plant that does well here if sited properly and with adequate water and rich soil, Ive filled open spaces in that bed with small ones of these i grew from stem cuttings

IMG_0125.jpg

Well thats all folks! No photos of the back this time.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tassie_Troy1971

Looks like you are growing a great range of stuff there . The mule palm looks great one of my favorites .

The extra canopy must help alot with the odd once or twice a year freeze event .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Thanks Troy! Canopy is key in Florida because we get really heavy frosts but our freezes tend to be short. We usually get about 10 or so freezes a year with 2-3 below 25 degrees F with the lowest in the past few years being 19ish. These mules in the front don't grow as well as the ones in the back and I don't know why, their trunks are thinner and their fronds tend to yellow prematurely. I used to have 3 mules in that spot but one died :/

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

Absolutely beautiful, good blend between tropical and traditional southern garden styles too.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cindy Adair

Wonderful that you can grow so many palms I didn't think would survive frost. Looks great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Thanks! I blended the southern style in because I wanted the yard to "fit in". Also, many of the old southern plants are favorites for a reason (they are survivors), even when we have devastating freezes again (like the 14 degrees Ocala got to before) the crinums, cast iron, shell gingers, ect will all come back in the spring and most of these could tolerate severe drought too. I'm lucky that my soil is a loamy clay mix in the front which allows me to grow plants without much fertilizer, it stays so wet violets overtook the St Augustine lawn in the front! The place always looks a bit messy once I go home though because I love dividing the plants and making the beds bigger, in the back I have a big fenced in cage full of palms and cycads that are waiting to be large enough to plant out!

One part of the southern landscape that I am slowly getting rid of are the azaleas. While they grow and flower well its a constant battle to keep the vines (smilax, virginia creeper, poison ivy to name a few) off of them. They are entirely too much work when planting shell ginger, crinums, and philodendrons makes a virtually carefree landscape!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevethegator

Great garden! Ocala always surprises me because it really seems to be the dividing line between subtropical and temperate. Many queens were killed a few miles up the road in Gainesville when I was there for the mega freeze in '10, while many in Ocala with similar siting were undamged!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

I actually lost a few smaller queens during that winter. Growing them on the edge of their hardiness really demonstrates that wide variations in cold tolerance they have. I recently got a 'Mountain Giant' queen to test out here and see if its more tolerant than the standard form. I also got the Uruguay form to try out as I've heard that they were cold tolerant. Speaking of Gainesville I'm always surprised what they can grow at Kanapaha, their gardens have given me some good ideas of new plants to try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sarasota alex

Great collection!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LI_Pets

Nice, also the fact that you're on a large piece of property gives you plenty of things to try and develop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sonoranfans

Great example of a zone 9a push krishna. those alfredii, protected from frost might be fine in zone 9a. Nice cocoid selection, and I am a fan of a live oak yard, very stately. Im sure you also have some sabals... maybe next time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

The photo of the tropical boarder has a long trunk on the right, thats our biggest Sabal. I also have a few smaller ones around the yard but nothing too spectacular yet including domengensis, 'blackburniana', miamiensis, minor, hopefully a 'Lisa', maritima, and Riverside. Palmettos come up as weeds every chance they can, I actively am ripping them out of the beds or the yard would be nothing but a palmetto forest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
zootropical

Great garden! Thk you! Do you have any pictures of your lamp and protection during frosty period? Thank you again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Alas I dont but to be honest it was very primitive. I simply stuck some wooden stakes in the ground and laid a large tarp on top anchoring the sides with large rocks to keep it from flying off. It just looked like a large poorly designed camping tent :) Then I took a standard agricultural heat lamp (the kind they use for keeping baby chickens warm) and used the red heat lamp bulb and placed it underneath. Since our freezes are so short in duration this worked quite well and the only leaves that were damaged were those touching the plastic.

Of note though I did not protect one of the kerriodoxa and the Lytocaryum yet during a very cold winter <25 all they got were soome brown tips on the leaves. I feel these two palms are hardier than given credit for...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicdoc

Krishna, I hear you are in med school... good luck. Anyway, what is your secret with th P. sunkha? Soil, etc. I would love to try one here, but I believe Keith, 90 miles West of me tried and failed. I think we have similar climates, but maybe not soil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

Krishna, I hear you are in med school... good luck. Anyway, what is your secret with th P. sunkha? Soil, etc. I would love to try one here, but I believe Keith, 90 miles West of me tried and failed. I think we have similar climates, but maybe not soil.

I think success is very likely if starting with a decent size palm, maybe 4 or 5 feet. I was starting with seedlings and that bad freeze in 09/10 followed by the record drought did them in. And understand, I don't baby my plants They get a little bit of help, but not much. My goal is not to raise dependents. I got enough to do on 3 acres without coddling individual plants.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edbrown_III

one of those hat heaters on LPG tank will keep a palm warm also --- thats my back up option for my jubeopsis and Dypsis decaryi when they get too tall to cover. you blow about $4 a night but we dont have that many freezes here in 9a Best regards Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicdoc

wow, keith, 3 acres. I gotta come over and check it out. You think we could pull of a parajub in heavily amended soil? Ed, this guy, Walt in FL keeps a cocos alive with heat cables around the trunk and growth bud. The leaves fry, but then regrow in the summer. Post pics of your jubaeopsis that's too tall to cover. Must be a site in Jacksonville...9a?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Krishna, I hear you are in med school... good luck. Anyway, what is your secret with th P. sunkha? Soil, etc. I would love to try one here, but I believe Keith, 90 miles West of me tried and failed. I think we have similar climates, but maybe not soil.

I started with a small seedling, planted it raised in soil altered with coarse sand and limestone rock chips and planted it where it was near a concrete structure (it's my understanding that it helps with nematodes). It gets a part day sun and some cold protection from the house it is relatively near.

Thanks for the med school well wishes! I recently finished second year!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicdoc

I was thinking if I started with seedling, keeping it in a pot of well-drained medium. Full sun in the winter, maybe in an unheated pop-up greenhouse then part shade in the summer. Doing this until I got to Keith's threshold 4-5 feet before planting in a raised bed of ideal medium over a tilled undersurface of native blackjack clay with sand/ limestone etc. Krishna, is your soil acid or alkaline... do you know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

wow, keith, 3 acres. I gotta come over and check it out. You think we could pull of a parajub in heavily amended soil? Ed, this guy, Walt in FL keeps a cocos alive with heat cables around the trunk and growth bud. The leaves fry, but then regrow in the summer. Post pics of your jubaeopsis that's too tall to cover. Must be a site in Jacksonville...9a?

You are welcome to visit my weed patch any time you are willing to make the drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

My soil is acid for the most part but the P sunkha is planted near a lot of concrete so it's probably a little more basic. It's florida clay in parts, black loam in others, and very sandy in the back but not that pure white sand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ghar41

Looking good! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Thanks all! Ive got 3 days off coming up soon that Im going to head back and start a new bed using A. engleri, P. bipinnadifidum, A. zerumbet (green), C. cooperi, and some other small plants. Ive also been collecting hardy bromeliads recently!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edbrown_III

Heres a photo of the Jubeaopsis its tucked up against the house so I cant get a good shot plus I have alot of vegetation and jungle around

post-562-0-53429000-1370310475_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phoenikakias

Heres a photo of the Jubeaopsis its tucked up against the house so I cant get a good shot plus I have alot of vegetation and jungle around

Soil round Jubaeopsis is sandy? Nice collection Krishna and most importantly, with healthy plants :greenthumb:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edbrown_III

Note beach sand like muc of FLorida but pretty sandy with some peat --- in habitat they grow on the side of a cliff in rather sparse soil . Best regards Ed

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zeeth

Heres a photo of the Jubeaopsis its tucked up against the house so I cant get a good shot plus I have alot of vegetation and jungle around

Wow that's impressive!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicdoc

Very jungly looking jubaeopsis! Can't wait till mine looks like that (10 years)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edbrown_III

Much obliged for the kind words.... I hope yours grows faster than this one ... I collected the seeds for it in August 1986 so it grows pretty slow. I am in zone 9a so theres a trade off between winter frost protection for deep freezes and full sun ( liek most of my plants). Best regards Ed

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicdoc

Yeah, I feel the same way 6 months out of the year I swear I'm living in the amazon. We get several years with barely a frost, then BAM some crazy winter like 2010. I will pop up a greenhouse every winter on the jc until it doesn't fit, then probably do some inventive protection after that if its looking like a winner. I was thinking of cropping any suckers that come off to give a single, curved trunk palm look. Do you think that would be detrimental to the palm?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edbrown_III

probably not --- this had one big sucker going into the house and I cut off thinking i could root botched the whole thing --- sucker never rooted --- but it didnt seem to hurt the plant at all. Its right by a window so I can alway make a drape around it and crakc the window a bit so the heat will keep it a few degrees above the outside. this part of FL is probably a bit like LA very hot and tropical except a few hours evey 3rd or 4th year. Best regards Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Very inspiring garden! Thank you for sharing this pics!

Yes, Lytocaryum weddelianum is a little tough palm and I think L.hoehnei and insigne will be also cold hardier than weddelianum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Very inspiring garden! Thank you for sharing this pics!

Yes, Lytocaryum weddelianum is a little tough palm and I think L.hoehnei and insigne will be also cold hardier than weddelianum.

I wish these Lytocaryums were more available in the US, they are great little understory palms!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Very inspiring garden! Thank you for sharing this pics!

Yes, Lytocaryum weddelianum is a little tough palm and I think L.hoehnei and insigne will be also cold hardier than weddelianum.

I wish these Lytocaryums were more available in the US, they are great little understory palms!

They are also difficult to find here!

Last i bought beautifull big seedlings (and the hoehnei were pinate), of L,insigne and L.hoehnei at e-jardim nursery in Rio de Janeiro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

Such a shame, they were hardier than the ubiquitous P. robelleni for me during the frigid 09-10 winter. I have a feeling they could be used much more in zone 9 if they were more readily available. Do they not make many seeds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      What are the light requirements of a spring sprouted Butia…it’s pushing out its second strap leaf and is in full sun…it was a fortuitous find and I want to treat it properly. 
    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Was watering and weeding this morning and noticed the wet, sunny Needle and the Brazoria trunks’ have really grown…the needle in height and the Brazoria in diameter. There are two other Needle trunks behind the one in the photo that are pretty tall as well, though lagging behind the one here.

      The Brazoria trunk really thickened as it pushes two flower spikes and four new fronds…by season’s end it will have four fully released fronds…given its slow history, this is amazing…guess that taproot finally reached its destination…

      Happy to have a Needle clumping palm that is establishing a trunk since zone 7 doesn’t harbor a climate for a variety of trunking palms…same for the trunking Brazoria…these are two that can have their trunks shown off, if you have the time to wait…Question for you Texas folks…generally speaking, how did Brazorias do during the freeze? Do they seem to rank among the survivors? 
    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Good morning! Don’t want to be boring on such a beautiful day but wanted to update on my zone 7 palms here in Northern Virginia. So far, no long, oppressive stretches of heat, somewhat cool nights, beneficial rains…not your typical NOVA experience…

      Named it Sasquatch…it’s trunk is about 9 feet tall now and that furry top 2 feet reminds me of a Sasquatch head. I do think it’s genetically engineered for the winter cold. It’s been a great palm.


      Sunny, wetter Needle…

      Shady, drier Needle…

      Brazoria really busting out and I’ll have seeds for the first time in 8 years or so…will definitely sprout some and share some if the damn squirrels don’t get to them first.

      Newest Trachy with some insect damage I’ve never seen before but it’s growing fast…stop yawning…

      Medi really doing well with a 2’ trunk but practically no protection. This past mild winter did yield some frond damage so guess I’ll just be cautious and ready to shroud it as long as that is possible…it’s really not a lot of damage, just enough to set off my neurotic urge to cut fronds off that otherwise should be left alone…but I’ve left them alone and, of course, my eye is drawn to the brown segment distractions but I’m getting better at accepting it.

      Mr. McCurtain…nice bluish cast to it but blue doesn’t grow it, so it remains as it is…maybe one frond a season…I’m sure it’s just way too shaded…

      Sabal minor seedling…have 3 of them on the bank…about as energetic as the McCurtain but no-protection wonders in their little microclimate…

      My miracle of the season…Butia catarinensis found growing off the deck in total shade…tried sprouting several with the bag method a year or so ago. Seeds molded so I laid them out on the garden bench to dry and a squirrel stole them all and this one managed to sprout…went through a winter and spring of total shade, no heat from the sun and here it is. Proof that not all squirrels are bad. There is one that knows what it’s doing. This was a really exciting find!

      Small pond facing south…never freezes as long as the water is moving…kind of the center of the south-facing microclimate…maybe adds a bit of heat in the winter as rocks and water catch the winter sun? Anyway, we zone 7 enthusiasts may be limited, but the enjoyment of getting these odd things to thrive here is very gratifying…and anyone who comes over for the first time is amazed…one day a tree removal guy told me he thought Sasquatch was fake…made me laugh.
       


    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Was weeding off the front edge of my ground level deck and found this:

      Really surprised me…can only be one of two kinds…a Sabal minor or a Butia catarinensis…it is most likely the Butia because I tried sprouting some seeds I ordered about a year ago with the bag method and they all molded…I tossed everything off the deck in that area and considered it a lost cause. If it is that, I’d be shocked because the seed made it through winter in dirt that gets no sun at all in winter to warm the soil. The sun, of course, drops on the horizon and this part of the yard, right off the deck gets shaded by the house the entire season. I did work with some Sabal minor seeds about 3 or 4 years ago but manually planted the extra seeds in the dirt to see if anything would come up…never saw any of those germinate. I do have some Sabal minors that I planted after they sprouted in pots and they are fine and in the ground for about two years. This surprise sprout is very thin and the Sabal straps, though older now, are much wider. Anybody with experience here? Could it be that, despite the conditions, the Butia sprouted?? Would be great if it did. It has literally been in total shade since it hit the dirt…the stuff on the deck has been shading it since it sprouted. Guess I should acclimate it slowly to a full sun location. I tried to get as much root as I could…hope digging it up didn’t hurt it…
    • teddytn
      By teddytn
      May be a good topic to touch on, at least in the U.S. temps are on the rise!  New to planting palms or an old head that maybe just planted a palm for the first time in a few years, good to touch on the basics. Any palm Sabal family, windmill family, butia, Jubaea etc etc. summer is when we can make up for some winter damage, setback, or at least slow down. What’s everyone’s watering schedule look like? 
×
×
  • Create New...