Jump to content
MKIVRYAN

Local Arizona Thread

Recommended Posts

MKIVRYAN

kentiopsis oliviformis. Been very happy with its ease of care.

post-5684-0-94368200-1432245377_thumb.jp

Edited by MKIVRYAN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pfancy

how much sun is the KO getting? i have two that are crawling along i think going on 2 years? super shaded

Edited by pfancy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MKIVRYAN

The one pictured is in full shade. I have one that get morning sun and it has done next to nothing in two years. This happy one get full shade, lots of water and good drainage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SueH_AZ

how much sun is the KO getting? i have two that are crawling along i think going on 2 years? super shaded

Hey man! Where ya been?

Need to post some pics of those Royals you sold us a couple years back. They're getting huge! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yunder Wækraus

I don't live in AZ, but I'm fascinated with the state. Are there specific neighborhoods with zone 10a temps, or is all of Phoenix that temperate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ando.wsu

Nice KO's. Regarding royals, I just dropped by the state Capitol building and the royal there looks the best I have ever seen. Also, the flame tree or delonix regia is blooming. Not a lot of blooms, but certainly better than nothing, and it looks healthier than the jacaranda trees growing there that look half dead and in need of removal of dead branches. I also think I spotted a pritchardia species of palm growing in the shade of said tree, never knew it could grow here. I'll post some pics when I get to a computer to see what you all think the palm ID might be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JasonD

I hope everyone enjoyed the meeting! Lots of palm talk and food.

Nice photos! Impressive Hyphaene.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

I don't live in AZ, but I'm fascinated with the state. Are there specific neighborhoods with zone 10a temps, or is all of Phoenix that temperate?

Generally,land inside the 101 loop is a little warmer than the outskirts but the area overall is only 9b.(last 2 winters though have been warmer than normal so subtropical species are looking great)

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ando.wsu

AZ capitol Building

post-6564-0-36041900-1432406742_thumb.jp

post-6564-0-66043500-1432406752_thumb.jp

post-6564-0-78493900-1432406763_thumb.jp

post-6564-0-00662600-1432406772_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

Need to post some pics of those Royals

Pseudophoenix too! :winkie:

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sandy Loam

I don't live in AZ, but I'm fascinated with the state. Are there specific neighborhoods with zone 10a temps, or is all of Phoenix that temperate?

Generally,land inside the 101 loop is a little warmer than the outskirts but the area overall is only 9b.(last 2 winters though have been warmer than normal so subtropical species are looking great)

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

____________________________

I was noticing that USDA generally has Phoenix listed as zone 9b, but it has the Yuma, AZ region (and points between Yuma and Mexico border) listed as 10a. USDA has that strip along interstate 8 from Yuma, AZ across to El Centro, CA and down to the Mexico border listed as zone 10a in its entirety. That appears to be the only zone 10 region in the state of Arizona. I wonder if it is because warm air shoots up from the Sea of Cortez in winter. That area seems to be directly above the Sea of Cortez and the sea appears to be pretty close to it, just a few miles across the Mexico border. Perhaps an Arizona native knows the scientific explanation for why this region stays so warm all winter.

I always thought it was strange that Tucson, AZ was farther south than both Yuma and Phoenix, yet it has colder temperatures in winter. Of course, Tucson is also farther from the Sea of Cortez, and I suppose it is possible that it is at higher elevation too.

Demystify me!

Edited by Sandy Loam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SueH_AZ

Need to post some pics of those Royals

Pseudophoenix too! :winkie:

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Yes, as well as assorted Thrinax/Coccothrinax... they're also looking great. :)

Will try to take some updated pics tomorrow...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pfancy

how much sun is the KO getting? i have two that are crawling along i think going on 2 years? super shaded

Hey man! Where ya been?

Need to post some pics of those Royals you sold us a couple years back. They're getting huge! :)

Kids and baseball/softball/soccer/football.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mcrawford

On Saturday afternoon, September 26th, famous adventurer and Ecotour leader Jeff Chemnick

will be in the Phoenix area giving a presentation to the Arizona Palm and Cycad Society.

His talk will summarize his most recent Mexican botanical Ecotour, featuring succulents, orchids,

palms, cycads, agaves, cactus, etc...

Jeff is a colorful character and his talk will be lively and informative, particularly for those who have

not yet been on one of his 2 week Oaxacan adventures. Refreshments and socializing to follow.

More information next month.

post-9457-0-35845500-1439229938_thumb.jp

post-9457-0-69501700-1439229939_thumb.jp

post-9457-0-07530800-1439229941_thumb.jp

post-9457-0-46444900-1439229942_thumb.jp

post-9457-0-22666100-1439229944_thumb.jp

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MKIVRYAN

Very interested in attending.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mcrawford

Please go to the local club website at http://www.arizonacycad.com for a map and details for Jeff's talk on Saturday Sept 26th 4PM/.

Please note, following the map east on Superstition Dr. you turn left AFTER the 3 large water tanks, not before!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MKIVRYAN

I will post this on the local FB page as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

Jeff was an excellent and very entertaining speaker! Everyone attending had a great time. Now,I am seriously considering joining him on one of his eco tours in southern Mexico.  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danilopez89

How did you all do with the heat this summer? Any palms that didn't make it? Any that did surprisingly well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

Had an 8 yo Jubaea that I grew from seed that finally gave up.It was about 15 gallon size.I only have 1 left that is smaller, same age,but still going.August is really tough on them with 115 degree temps with high humidity!

Also have about 30 new seedlings from the blue one at mission bay to try again...

 

aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

20151011_143525.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danilopez89

Had an 8 yo Jubaea that I grew from seed that finally gave up.It was about 15 gallon size.I only have 1 left that is smaller, same age,but still going.August is really tough on them with 115 degree temps with high humidity!

Also have about 30 new seedlings from the blue one at mission bay to try again...

 

aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

20151011_143525.jpg

Surprises me that you have so much trouble growing these. Must mean that you get more humidity than we do in the Palm Springs area. Here's some I've been keeping up with the past several years. They seem to be growing well even though they're in the middle of the lawn and must get a bunch of over spray from the sprinklers.

IMG_20151026_25965.thumb.jpg.cd900e858c2IMG_20151026_45549.thumb.jpg.c7b9b46bd51

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danilopez89

K oliviformis

King palm

W disticha

Carpenteria A

Sorry for the mispelling on the names.

 

post-5684-0-89810600-1423838644_thumb.jp

post-5684-0-23863100-1423838658_thumb.jp

post-5684-0-42427900-1423838674_thumb.jp

post-5684-0-96390500-1423838689_thumb.jp

I really want some carpenterias... about 30 of them...:lol:

where do you guys get them from?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danilopez89

If you're looking for an unusual,large,feather type palm that is rarely seen in AZ,all the Parajubaea species seem to be bullitproof to our conditions.I have a couple in the ground taking full western sun exposure,and they are trouble free once they get going.Surprisingly,this species does most of its growing over our winters and spring,just hanging out over the summer.Definitely worth a try if you have the space.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

post-236-0-56576300-1425145672_thumb.jpg

Is that some sort of tiki man in the far back of pic?:o

I'm just sitting here inspecting aztropics pics for some "special palms"...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic
  • That's just "Phil" the flag bearer. Carved from an old W.filifera stump...

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2013-12-26 17.43.03.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

A few other palms I would highly recommend for a hot desert climate come from the species Copernicia.VERY few people even dare to try them here in Arizona but I can assure you,they have generally been a trouble free grow and most are a lot faster than you think. 

Copernicia glabrescens is a blue clumper,but I have been trimming mine to keep it a single trunk for now.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2015-10-27 16.55.17.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

Copernicia baileyana needs no introduction.Once planted in the ground,stand back as this species really takes off!

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2015-10-27 16.55.59.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

Copernicia berteroana is native to the Dominican Republic.I started this one from seed I collected in habitat in 2006.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2015-10-27 16.56.43.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

Another winner is Copernicia macroglossa.Native to Cuba,these survive full desert sun and drought and keep growing at a fairly quick pace.Every year,I expect to see some flowers on this one as it's got some trunk,but nothing yet.

2015-10-27 16.57.04.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danilopez89

They're all awesome! :yay:

I have a new rule when I'm out palm shopping - "never pass out on a copernicia". I want to collect as many as I can now...

How old is your bailey palm?  Has it always looked "bluish" or "silver". I have I little one and its very green. I'm wondering if they change color as they get older?

What a cool collection of palms you have Aztropics!:greenthumb:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

Bailey is about 10 years old from seed.It started out with green strap leaves but has gotten a little bluer with the more mature leaves.I probably kept this one in a pot longer than I should have because I sure noticed a growth explosion a year after I planted it in the ground.My advice...pick a spot and get this species in the ground asap.

I've done this with Copernicia cowellii seedlings just this year and the ground planted examples have grown faster with strap leaves that are at least 3 times wider than all the rest of the crop still in 1 gal pots in the greenhouse.

aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

20151024_123910.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danilopez89

I do have a nice spot picked out for my bailey palm already, I just wasn't sure if the palm was big enough to be planted out yet. Its in a 1g container and only had 3 small leaves on it when I bought it . It has pushed 2 new ones since late spring. I was afraid to give it too much sun at first so it sat in mostly shade for a while, but now it gets as much sun as I can give it. And it loves it.

Thanks for the advice aztropic, I might plant my bailey this week now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SueH_AZ

Some cold nights ahead for the Phoenix area in the coming days.  Going to spend tomorrow wrapping Christmas lights around some of our more tender stuff.  Might put some of the smaller pots in the garage.  Hope the spindle we bought last spring makes it... it's too big to move.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
darkcoolboo

I'm trying to establish a fast growing tree canopy for my trees to protect them from the cold, but many of the attractive flowering trees are semi-deciduous in the winter, when the protection is needed the most. What are some good choices?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic
5 hours ago, darkcoolboo said:

I'm trying to establish a fast growing tree canopy for my trees to protect them from the cold, but many of the attractive flowering trees are semi-deciduous in the winter, when the protection is needed the most. What are some good choices?

Ice cream bean tree! VERY fast grower with compound leaves that stays green year round.Ficus nitida or lemon trees also do a good job.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mcrawford

Arizona folks,

We are going to have a spring open gardens and potluck buffet

at the home of Oby Kingsbury in Phoenix on Sat May 21st.

More details to follow.

Jubea_Chiliensis.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben in Norcal
2 hours ago, aztropic said:

Ice cream bean tree! VERY fast grower with compound leaves that stays green year round.Ficus nitida or lemon trees also do a good job.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Aren't these very cold sensitive?

 

8 hours ago, darkcoolboo said:

I'm trying to establish a fast growing tree canopy for my trees to protect them from the cold, but many of the attractive flowering trees are semi-deciduous in the winter, when the protection is needed the most. What are some good choices?

Some of the Acacias should do nicely for you, and are evergreen.  I am growing lots of these from seed now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic
8 minutes ago, Ben in Norcal said:

Aren't these very cold sensitive?

 

 

Maybe slightly cold sensitive.Definitely good till 26F or lower... I have all 3 growing 15 plus years in Mesa,Arizona.In 2007,it did go down to 22F a couple nights which totally defoliated ice cream bean and ficus,also killing 1/3 of the wood;but they bounce back quickly and are still alive today.Normal winter lows usually bottom out around 29F for 1 or 2 nights per year.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben in Norcal
1 minute ago, aztropic said:

Maybe slightly cold sensitive.Definitely good till 26F or lower... I have all 3 growing 15 plus years in Mesa,Arizona.In 2007,it did go down to 22F a couple nights which totally defoliated ice cream bean and ficus,also killing 1/3 of the wood;but they bounce back quickly and are still alive today.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

That is really good to know, that would make them good to go here.  I thought they couldn't take a freeze.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
2 hours ago, aztropic said:

Maybe slightly cold sensitive.Definitely good till 26F or lower... I have all 3 growing 15 plus years in Mesa,Arizona.In 2007,it did go down to 22F a couple nights which totally defoliated ice cream bean and ficus,also killing 1/3 of the wood;but they bounce back quickly and are still alive today.Normal winter lows usually bottom out around 29F for 1 or 2 nights per year.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Agree with Scott, these have turned out to be a lot hardier than many believed. I was always told " will drop all foliage below 30F" many times when id ask so called experts about cold hardiness before seeing a nice sized specimen growing at a nursery in Vista... While Vista is obviously a bit warmer, overall, than my backyard back in San Jose, something told me to pick up a couple anyway. No issues over the winters they spent there. Good to know however that surviving 22F is possible.. just in case.:greenthumb:

Ben, i'm sure if you did a search on local nurseries  that sell tropical fruit ( here in Phoenix) you'd be just as surprised as i was the first time i took notes on the range of exotic stuff that is being tried.. or is doing well here in the valley. Quite an impressive list for growing in a "desert" vs. Florida.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...