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Jim in Los Altos

How Many Of Your In-Ground Palms Are Volunteers?

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Jim in Los Altos

I thought this might be an interesting topic since many of you have answered the question of how many palms you have in the ground. Well how many of those are volunteers? I pull hundreds of seedlings out of the ground annually but have left several to grow to maturity. Archontophoenix, Trachycarpus, Syagrus, Butia, Chamaedorea, Phoenix, Washingtonia to name some of the genus that drop seeds that sprout routinely. Less than 25 of my 300+ in-ground palms are volunteers and it probably won't go higher than that until some of my rarer species start to flower and fruit. I always feel bad when I have to pull out hundreds of palm "weeds" and toss them out.

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ghar41

I pull almost all of the volunteers that show up in my yard, like yourself many are common species that I definately do not want more of.

I have taken Chamaedorea radicalis fruit and spread them around the yard though- I have dozens of 4 or 5 leaf seedlings.

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DoomsDave

For me, none.

However, Pauleen Sullivan's famous trio of Hedyscepe has two volunteers that popped up on either side of the mother plant in the center and let grow.

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Sutter Bob

I have an endless supply of Washingtonia volunteers from all the birds that roost in my tall trees.

I always keep a few juvenile forms around since I like the appearance of the young plants.

This year I used a couple to provide cover for some Bismarckia seedlings, transient anthropically mediated bicoryphoid symbiosis you might say (or maybe not).

If it works (too early to say) it'll be the first time I've gotten a Bismarck through the winter.

None of my other palms are seeding yet although my next-door neighbor has a fruiting Butia odorata next to our fence and there are quite a few fruiting Trachycarpus and Syagrus in the neighborhood.

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Mandrew968

I often have to pull out palm seedling/weeds too--Ptychosperma elegans, washingtonia, and sabals. I have a Chamaedorea metallica that volunteered as well as a radicalis--I will leave them where they fell :) My father has a super nice Heterospathe elata that volunteered and it's staying put.

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Kathryn

Chamaedorea radicalis is the only volunteer I've let remain other than a Livistona chinenses seedling that has been growing in a Butia for about ten years. It's still strap leafed.

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sur4z

I have one...a Veitchia Merrillii that showed up a few years ago and now has about 9 feet of wood.

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Eric in Orlando

At my house I have let several Sabal palmetto remain where they sprouted to grow up.

At Leu Gardens, we have left Arenga engleri, Acrocomia totai, Sabal palmetto, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Chamaedorea microspadix, and Livistona chinensis in places to grow. In recent years dozens of Arenga engleri seedlings have been showing up all across the 50 acres. Not to the point of being annoying, but something has discovered the fruit and is scattering them. I have also started finding Caryota mitis seedlings.

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kinzyjr

A sabal palmetto.  I remove a lot of pygmy date palm single leaf volunteers every year.

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Cape Garrett

Chamaedorea Plumosa, Pygmy Date(never had one but sprouted and left it there) and a few Christmas palms.  May leave a few king palms...everything else gets pulled at this point.

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Umbrae

Literally thousands of copernicia prunifera 

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