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osideterry

Pics of Huge Sabals...

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osideterry

Last time I was at South Coast Palms I was floored by how wide the spread was on a couple of Gary Wood's Sabals. I thought it might be interesting to see a bunch of them as a thread here. Photos with people for scale are even better. Any species works - bermudana, riverside, yapa - all the monsters.

I'm at work, and will check through my photos and post them when I get home.

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koolthing78

Not that I have any pictures, or that this is even really that relevant to the request, but as someone from the west coast of Florida, I am always struck by the height of the sabals growing wild closer to the east coast (like the St. John's River basin area). I don't remember exactly which road it is (I think there are several), but driving across the state, through the flat marshes and then suddenly seeing these enormously tall stands of cabbage palms--it just always makes my eyes pop out.

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iamjv

I bought a few sabals from Gary about 10 yrs ago.... below is a picture of a sabal that was labeled Riverside. The fronds on this palm are about the size of a S. Mexicana. It's been extremely fast growing for a sabal but it has a unique characteristic of the fronds and petioles yellowing as they get older but only on one side of the palm. You can see this in the first picture.

Also have a sabal that was purchased as 'unknown/possible burmudana' and it has been slower growing but has huge fronds. I don't believe it's a burmudana, maybe it's Blackburnia. I'll have to get a picture of it tomorrw and post there after... Jv

Sabal Riverside pics:

post-362-1223081067_thumb.jpg

post-362-1223081107_thumb.jpg

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FRITO

One of my favorite genuses......

look forward to lotsa photos.

JV, on your Sabal I like the orange petioles. do you have a photo of the trunk region? looks like a nice palm.

I only have seedlings at this time of sabals

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iamjv

Luke,

This seems to be the only pic of the trunk I have at this time... as you can see it still has all of it's boots on. This much trunk in 10 yrs growth from a 2 leave seedling. Jv

post-362-1223086222_thumb.jpg

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pg6922

Here are a few in St James City,Fl

Sabal Domingensis

9sabledomingensis.jpg

6sabledomingensis.jpg

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Phil

Terry,

For leaf size, I think Sabal bermudana is pretty good. Also, Sabal "riverside". You can view the riverside at the bathrooms at the tennis courts in Morley Field in S.D. But, for majestic leaf size, Coryphas win hands down. One leaf can cover a VW bug. I remember the first time I saw one in person at Lyon Arboretum in Honolulu during a rainstorm. I thought if only we could cut one and use it for shelter. I would cover 20 people from the rain.

Phil

Sabal burmudana

sabal_bermudiensis_002.gif

Corypha

corypha_sp_02.GIF

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osideterry

Great pics JV and pg6922 - that's what I'm talking about!

I couldn't agree more regarding Corypha, Phil. Let's build a greenhouse big enough to house one here in San Diego. Make it tall enough for a few Pigafettas while we're at it.

Here's Gary Wood's Sabal maritima, followed by a couple of big Sabals at the Quail Garden.

post-662-1223129656_thumb.jpg

post-662-1223129672_thumb.jpg

post-662-1223129683_thumb.jpg

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iamjv

Wow that Maritima looks a lot like the 'riverside' I have here.... wonder if that is truly what I have??? Is it also rather fast growing? Thanks, Jv

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Eric in Orlando

Heres a few.

tall Sabal palmetto, just after they were over trimmed, in an Orlando yard

2407.jpg

S. casiarum x palmetto in a local yard

b8b4.jpg

S. domingensis at Bok Tower Gardens, a few months after the 3 2004 hurricanes

7c0e.jpg

S. causiarum at the Edison Estate in Ft. Myers

aa6b.jpg

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Eric in Orlando

Here is some here at Leu Gardens

S. causiarum

34d6.jpg

fcd8.jpg

S. yapa

d1e4.jpg

S. domingensis

adfb.jpg

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Eric in Orlando

S. guatemalensis

37a6.jpg

S. bermudana

f679.jpg

S. blackburniana

2054.jpg

S. uresana

eb0a.jpg

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sonoranfans

I have a few sabals, they grow well here with <6 hrs of direct sun perday. Too much arizona sun at the hottest part of the dry season will cook em, but they can take 5-6 hours of hot sun(@115F) in the dry part of the year. Here is a palm that I bought as sabal blackburniana this morning at sunrise with an octoberfest for scale. In the desert, sunrise tends to cast a blue light quickly followed by intense yellow as the sun clears the horizon. I saw the parent palm at the local nursery, its pretty big.

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sonoranfans

and here is the fruit, kind of large and a bit pear shaped at the connecting stem.

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sonoranfans

Here is my sabal bermudana, sorry its too densely planted for the beer bottle, but its about 11' overall height. Its not as wide and the fronds arent as large as my aka blackburniana.

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sonoranfans

and the bermudana fruits are notably smaller.

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iamjv

Here are the shots of my bermudana....

Jv

post-362-1223147456_thumb.jpg

post-362-1223147610_thumb.jpg

post-362-1223147663_thumb.jpg

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Jon North Padre Island

Here is one of my two Sabal mexicana. For scale the adjacent low section of the fence is about four feet - 120 cm - in height. I have two about the same size. The small palm just in front of the S. mexicana is a Sabal uresana that I started from seed 5 years ago. The palms crowding the S. mexicana on the left are Acoelorraphe wrightii.

post-418-1223184609_thumb.jpg

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Jon North Padre Island

Here is a shot of two Sabal mexicana in Weslaco, Texas. The taller one, closest to the building, is said to be the tallest S. mexicana in Texas. This tree had grown somewhere else and the property owners wanted to get rid of it. Tad and some of his associates moved the tree to this location which is an Audubon Soc establishment.

post-418-1223185689_thumb.jpg post-418-1223185703_thumb.jpg

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paulgila

Picture305.jpg

large sabal.

Picture312.jpg

Picture313.jpg

Picture317.jpg

smaller sabal.

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Kris

Dear Terry :)

Lovely topic And by favouriate amoung sabals are SRS & Texas Sabal (Mexicana)..

Dear Phil :)

In your post 7,the 2nd still stating a 'Corypha' appears to me as Copernica Hospita...? :hmm:

Here is a still of a Talipot Palms..

IMG_2192.jpg

Lots of love,

Kris :)

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edbrown_III

Heres a S. maritima ( I think) collected seed from PR bot garden about 12 years ago

post-562-1223222385_thumb.jpg

post-562-1223222415_thumb.jpg

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osideterry

Sabal maritima seems like an overlooked species compared to other Sabals. What a beast.

Jv - On Dave's Garden, the photo of a Sabal riverside is also actually S. maritima (first link). The second link looks like another shot of Gary Woods

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/124756/

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/146646/

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iamjv

Thanks for the links and info. Jv

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Tomsky

Sabals seem to grow slowly until they form a trunk. Then they speed up. This is Sabal rosei.

post-1848-1223263969_thumb.jpg

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Tomsky

Sabal rosei

post-1848-1223264222_thumb.jpg

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Tomsky

Sabal parviflora

post-1848-1223264434_thumb.jpg

Edited by Tomsky

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Tomsky

Sabal parviflora

post-1848-1223264924_thumb.jpg

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paulgila

lookin good,tomsky! sabal must do really well in norcal,good choice!

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SubTropicRay

Great photos. Is S. blackburniana really S. domingensis?

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FRITO
Great photos. Is S. blackburniana really S. domingensis?

I heard it was lumped with S. palmetto :hmm:

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tank

Is S. parviflora synonymous with S. palmetto?

Sabal parviflora

post-1848-1223264924_thumb.jpg

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BigFrond

If you want to see a big sabal or sabals, go to Palomar College. There is a monster there (causiarum) in the arboretum that is wayyyy bigger than any of Gary Woods. This palm would make a bizzie look small. Check it here, the 9th picture down.

http://waynesword.palomar.edu/arbimg1.htm

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FRITO

this sabal is diffrent than the native S. palmetto seen in the back left of the photo. this at St Marks, FL on a balmy January overcast day.

I have posted before and no conclusion was reached on what it was. possibly domengensis or casusiarium or a hybrid with palmetto.

post-741-1223309300_thumb.jpg

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iamjv

BigFrond,

Interesting looking sabal pictured there... seems to have a very open crown. Like the trunk as well. Does any one have access to fresh seeds from a casusiarium? Jv

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Tad

The 2 palms in jon's post are the I think state of Texas record holder as tallest sabals, they were moved with 90 inch tree spades by Gulf Coast Contracting!!

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sur4z

this guy lives at my office.

10-07-08_0940.jpg

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sonoranfans
this sabal is diffrent than the native S. palmetto seen in the back left of the photo. this at St Marks, FL on a balmy January overcast day.

I have posted before and no conclusion was reached on what it was. possibly domengensis or casusiarium or a hybrid with palmetto.

It used to be that the fruits were used to distinguish sabals. Bermudana and palmetto have fruits that are 8-12mm, round and black. Domingenisis and causarium have larger fruits(as do mexicana, uresana). My "blackburniana has fruits that are purplish brown and measure 14-17mm when ripe. I assume some of the smaller ones are dehydrated, happens here. Because of these observations on the fruit, and the size of the fronds(5 1/2 feet of petiole, 5' fronds as a late stage juvenile) of my blackburniana, I doubt its a sabal palmetto. The parent palm has larger fronds/petioles. I am pretty sure its not a mexicana, or uresana, but the other two are possibilities. It is also possible that sabals just grow huge out here. The one pictured above, ~12+ in overall height, was planted as a 24" box with no trunk in spring '05.

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edbrown_III

Good show on the photos Eric Frito et al..

Heres one of my fav orite Sabals S. domingensis-- collected from seed in D.R. in 88'--- I is testing photos sizes so my appologies if this is a missfire.

Best wishes,

Ed

post-562-1223568063_thumb.jpg

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