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Cupressus macrocarpa 'Goldcrest' aka Lemon Cypress


_Keith

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Picked one of these at the nurseries today. Too cool to pass up. Have no idea how it will grow in the humid subtropic Louisiana environment, but it was too nice and too cheap not to try.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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Those are awesome plants - and come in blue - they are sold by the thousands here in box stores as decoratives - I have NEVER EVER been able to keep one alive no matter what I do. GRRR.

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They are tough in my climate but there is a pest that causes small branches to die back ruining the look of the plant.they also grow into huge trees. Cupressus sempravirans "stricta" is more popular having a narrow columnar form makes it easier to fit into smaller gardens. The draw back with them is that when they begin to nut the branches bend away from the trunk lossing their tight form. They are over used landscape plants in my region

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  • 1 month later...

Those are awesome plants - and come in blue - they are sold by the thousands here in box stores as decoratives - I have NEVER EVER been able to keep one alive no matter what I do. GRRR.

I have also tried Lemon Cypress here in TN. It was a dud. Just too cold here. However, another nice box store tree that is often sold right alongside Lemon Cypress is Chamaecyparis Lawsonia "Elwoodii." Has a nice narrow habit like true Italian Cypress. Had trouble growing it until I planted it in afternoon shade. Should be able to take full sun further north with Lawsonia varieties being quite cold hardy.

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Definitely not too cold here, but maybe too humid. It is already looking rough and disease is creeping in. Gonna treat it with a systemic fungicide this week, but I got a bad feeling.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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My fiancee got 2 more this year - these two are a very dark blackish green - beautiful - been 2 or 3 weeks - still look good. Fingers crossed. Keeping an extra-watchful eye on not letting them dry out at all.

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My fiancee got 2 more this year - these two are a very dark blackish green - beautiful - been 2 or 3 weeks - still look good. Fingers crossed. Keeping an extra-watchful eye on not letting them dry out at all.

Was wondering what climate zone you are? Would be surprised if Cupressus Macrocarpa survives past USDA 7b unprotected. We have had 8a type winters here before with Cupressus macrocarpa surviving; only to have it die out the very next winter because temperatures were closer to the actual zone rating I live in of 6b.

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Definitely not too cold here, but maybe too humid. It is already looking rough and disease is creeping in. Gonna treat it with a systemic fungicide this week, but I got a bad feeling.

Was wondering what zone rating you are as well? Depending on where you planted it, it should be fine if you are USDA 7b+.

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This just never makes a good looking tree. Its nice looking when young but unattractive as semi-adult. Its an easy grow here but not attractive enough to grow it. It loves good drainage and ample water availability.

Cupressus sempervirens is native here and the normal, wide branching kind makes beautiful trees with impressive buttress roots, much better looking and more useful as a tree than C. macrocarpa ''Goldcrest'' as it provides good canopy and can grow palms and other plants beneath them easily. C. macrocarpa is too dense and closed for that. Gets wide without providing useful canopy.

If you like conifers, Libocedrus is way nicer, though slower growing.

''To try,is to risk failure.......To not try,is to guarantee it''

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I'm in zone 5b. This is an indoor tree for me.

How well does it perform as an indoor tree? It might be the only chance mine has left.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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Keith - All of the ones previous have died - dried out - undoubtedly from allowing it to dry out - going to try to keep these new ones longer. I'll keep you guys updated!

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They just need lots of light/sun to thrive and good air circulation. They are not suited to indoor or understory environment at all. This species sheds branches that are growing in the shade. So give it very high light, good drainage and air circulation and keep moist.

Keith, you should be able to grow it in a raised bed with rich soil and good drainage. They are quite fungus prone both on the foliage, bark and roots and high humidity and constant warm rains increase the likelihood of infection and fast disease progression, but if you try a few, you should be able to grow one to good size with a little luck. If I were you, I would rather grow a swamp cypress, Libocedrus sp., one of the nicer Cryptomeria or Taiwania cryptomerioides...These would appreciate the moisture availability without being as rot prone and have much nicer form.

''To try,is to risk failure.......To not try,is to guarantee it''

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They just need lots of light/sun to thrive and good air circulation. They are not suited to indoor or understory environment at all. This species sheds branches that are growing in the shade. So give it very high light, good drainage and air circulation and keep moist.

Keith, you should be able to grow it in a raised bed with rich soil and good drainage. They are quite fungus prone both on the foliage, bark and roots and high humidity and constant warm rains increase the likelihood of infection and fast disease progression, but if you try a few, you should be able to grow one to good size with a little luck. If I were you, I would rather grow a swamp cypress, Libocedrus sp., one of the nicer Cryptomeria or Taiwania cryptomerioides...These would appreciate the moisture availability without being as rot prone and have much nicer form.

Cryptomerias are fun to grow! Your sir, really know your conifers!

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They just need lots of light/sun to thrive and good air circulation. They are not suited to indoor or understory environment at all. This species sheds branches that are growing in the shade. So give it very high light, good drainage and air circulation and keep moist.

Keith, you should be able to grow it in a raised bed with rich soil and good drainage. They are quite fungus prone both on the foliage, bark and roots and high humidity and constant warm rains increase the likelihood of infection and fast disease progression, but if you try a few, you should be able to grow one to good size with a little luck. If I were you, I would rather grow a swamp cypress, Libocedrus sp., one of the nicer Cryptomeria or Taiwania cryptomerioides...These would appreciate the moisture availability without being as rot prone and have much nicer form.

Well, it got sucker punched this winter. Very mild and extremely humid. Have seen the sun on day in last couple of weeks.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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