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Morinda citrifolia cold damage


empireo22
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Here is what my potted noni looks like after the cold front and seeing 40 degrees (4 c) one night and 43 (6 c) the next. The fruit stayed but lost a lot of leaves and major foliage burn.

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here my 2 year old coffee seedling is grown in the ground in a mostly shade protected location and still burned. I thought coffee could handle colder temps aslong as there is no frost but I guess 40 is too cold, next time a blanket.

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and here is my jackfruit seedling and a coconut showing minor burn from the cold.

Morinda citrifolia is my most cold sensitive followed by coffee.....

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Jackfruit here in California takes well below 40F and doesn't show any damage at all. In Southern California it's relatively easy to grow and takes down to 32F no problem, even a couple of degrees below that. here in Central California I can grow it outside fully exposed to chill (32-45F) but it doesn't grow enough during the Summer due to our cool Summer nights. Coffee, on the other hand, grows outdoors here in Central California and puts on good Summer growth, and takes plenty of chill, down to the 30's no problem. Ask Jeff in Modesto, where he's managed to grow coffee without any challenges even though Winter temps there are usually 32-45F for the bulk of December and January. (Except this year, of course, it's been much warmer.)

So this confirms my theory that a lot of plants need a period of gradual hardening up with gradually drier and cooler conditions, something which they don't get in South Florida.

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I find it strange that the older foliage on the coffee was burnt and the new growth looks fine. Im not sure if the tip damage on the jackfruit is from the cold or not but it showed up after so I assume so....hopefully I can get them to fruit.

weather was decent before the cold front with lows in the mid 60s most nights so must be from shock. Can noni be grown outdoors in California?

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I find it strange that the older foliage on the coffee was burnt and the new growth looks fine. Im not sure if the tip damage on the jackfruit is from the cold or not but it showed up after so I assume so....hopefully I can get them to fruit.

weather was decent before the cold front with lows in the mid 60s most nights so must be from shock. Can noni be grown outdoors in California?

I don't know anyone who's tried growing noni here in California. The Noni is the only one that didn't surprise me, I would have expected it to be about as hardy as breadfruit.

I tried to drink some noni juice last time I went to Costa Rica, it was so disgusting, I couldn't swallow. Do you drink noni juice?

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Jackfruit here in California takes well below 40F and doesn't show any damage at all. In Southern California it's relatively easy to grow and takes down to 32F no problem, even a couple of degrees below that. here in Central California I can grow it outside fully exposed to chill (32-45F) but it doesn't grow enough during the Summer due to our cool Summer nights. Coffee, on the other hand, grows outdoors here in Central California and puts on good Summer growth, and takes plenty of chill, down to the 30's no problem. Ask Jeff in Modesto, where he's managed to grow coffee without any challenges even though Winter temps there are usually 32-45F for the bulk of December and January. (Except this year, of course, it's been much warmer.)

So this confirms my theory that a lot of plants need a period of gradual hardening up with gradually drier and cooler conditions, something which they don't get in South Florida.

Agree with Axel. It's not so much the absolute low temps that do the damage; it's how things are hardened off. On the plus side, FL's generally warm temps allow much more rapid recovery (compared to CA) as well.

Doubtful noni will grow in CA; maybe in a plastic-covered room/frame in mildest SoCal. Fairly common and easy in Dade Co; never tried it in Palm Beach Co though.

SoCal and SoFla; zone varies by location.

'Home is where the heart suitcase is'...

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"If, as they say, there truly is no rest for the wicked, how can the Devil's workshop be filled with idle hands?"

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  • 7 years later...
On 1/11/2014 at 3:22 PM, fastfeat said:

Agree with Axel. It's not so much the absolute low temps that do the damage; it's how things are hardened off. On the plus side, FL's generally warm temps allow much more rapid recovery (compared to CA) as well.

 

Doubtful noni will grow in CA; maybe in a plastic-covered room/frame in mildest SoCal. Fairly common and easy in Dade Co; never tried it in Palm Beach Co though.

They grow quickly and effortlessly throughout all of South Florida. Almost weedy once established. The cold (temps in the 40s) usually burn their leaves back, but since they grow so fast, new growth replaces them quickly. I planted a 1 foot tall tree last July and now it's 7 feet tall and fruiting heavily. Mine saw perhaps 5 nights with lows in the 40s this winter, but that didn't slow it down too much.

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