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Cold Tolerant Hoyas/Dischidias?


epiphyte

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Which species of Hoyas and Dischidias have people in Southern California (and similar climates) been growing outdoors year around? I've been interested in epiphytic plants for quite some time now but it wasn't until last year that I really started to branch out into Hoyas and Dischidias.
Here's a partial list of plants that I had outside in Glendale this last winter. One night it got down to at least 32F. All of them are mounted and a few are covered in plastic. I plan on propagating the ones covered in plastic so that I can try divisions under shade cloth.
Dischidia bengalensis - The base of mine rotted but I'm remounting it in my terrarium. A few of my friends are growing it outdoors.
Dischidia cleistantha - Strong summer grower but each winter around half of the new growth dies back. This last winter, because of the frost, the die back seemed especially severe. Here's a picture of one of mine wrapped around my Ficus "bonsai"...
Dischidia formosana - pretty great outdoors
Dischidia hirsuta - covered in plastic
Dischidia ioantha variegata - seems marginal outdoors
Dischidia milnei - slow but no winter dieback
Dischidia nummularia (large leaf type) - covered in plastic. The large leaf type which is probably from Australia seems more tolerant than the small leaf type from Malaysia, Singapore, etc. I also have a variety which is from China.
Dischidia rafflesiana - covered in plastic
Dischidia ruscifolia - covered in plastic and under shade cloth. Seems marginal.
Hoya australis ssp. keysii? - fairly succulent, yellowish and fuzzy. A bit of dieback but should be pretty good grower once better established.
Hoya australis ssp. oramicola - didn't seem too bothered by the frost but it very gradually began to drop its leaves. Now it only has one or two leaves left...not sure if it's going to recover.
Hoya australis ssp. not rupicola - purchased as rupicola but it's not nearly as succulent as the plants I've seen as rupicola. Leaves are fairly dark green and elongated. No problem with the cold.
Hoya bella - covered in plastic but shouldn't have a problem with more exposure.
Hoya cumingiana - covered in plastic but a friend lost his this last winter. He'd had it for several years but recently and accidentally decreased its drainage.
Hoya excavata - killed by the frost
Hoya fungii - has already sent out new growth
Hoya globulosa - just starting to send out new growth
Hoya kerri - no problem with the cold. Several of my friends are also growing it outdoors with no problem. Probably needs quite a bit of summer heat though so might not work for people along the coast.
Hoya khoniana 'Eskimo' - strong summer grower but unfortunately the freeze killed it. I gave some rooted plants to three friends with greenhouses so I should be able to get it back. This time I'll know to bring it indoors if there's a chance of frost.
Hoya lacunosa - mostly fried but I just stuck a few sad pieces in my terrarium.
Hoya litoralis - didn't seem to do that well to begin with...so kinda hard to say. I just have a small piece left covered in plastic.
Hoya loheri - strong summer grower and didn't even seem bothered by the frost
Hoya meliflua - killed by the frost
Hoya nummularioides - had around 5 established cuttings. Lost a couple...doesn't seem like a strong grower.
Hoya polyneura - seems pretty solid
Hoya serpens - no problem with the cold...a bit on the slow side.
Hoya shepherdii? - no problem with the cold
None of my "conclusions" are really definitive. Perhaps I just ended up with an especially tender clone...or maybe the plant just ended up in the coldest location in my garden. Or maybe the plant wasn't established enough.
A few others being grown outdoors by friends...
Hoya carnosa
Hoya linealis
Hoya obovata
Hoya pubicalyx
Here are some that might work based on their distribution...
Hoya acuminata
Hoya acuta
Hoya aldrichii
Hoya amoena/verticillata
Hoya angustifolia
Hoya arnottiana
Hoya bhutanica
Hoya burmanica
Hoya chinghungensis
Hoya crassifolia
Hoya edenii
Hoya erythrostemma
Hoya fusca
Hoya gonoloboides
Hoya griffithii
Hoya kanyakumariana
Hoya krohniana
Hoya latifolia
Hoya lobbii
Hoya manipurensis
Hoya micrantha
Hoya motoskei
Hoya nicholsoniae
Hoya oblanceolata
Hoya oreogena
Hoya ovalifolia
Hoya pachyclada
Hoya pallida
Hoya pandurata
Hoya parviflora
Hoya pauciflora
Hoya pottsii
Hoya pseudo-littoralis
Hoya retusa
Hoya revolubilis
Hoya rigida
Hoya teretifolia
Hoya thomsonii
Hoya vaccinoides
Hoya weebella/dickasoniana
Hoya wightii
I'm looking forward to hearing the experiences of other people who've been growing Hoyas and Dischidias outdoors in Southern California. I'm definitely interested in trying new species so if anybody in my area is interested in trading...please send me a message.
Also posted to...
Edited by epiphyte
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  • 6 years later...
  • 2 years later...

It seems to me that most all of these you’ve listed as doing well are actually “cold growing” species and is probably why they survived. Somewhere on Google I found a sheet with a list of all Hoyas under the iml prefix and more and they were labeled as either cold growing, intermediate, or warm growing. Check it out. 

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You may be referring to either the David Liddle Hoya Catalog, or the version that Vermont Hoyas posted from that. There are no really COLD growing species. As in tolerating the 20-40F range for long periods. Liddle classified them as COOL (50-77F) INTERMEDIATE (60-95) and WARM (70-95). Meaning that the extremes of each temp range could be tolerated for extended periods.

 

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"You can't see California without Marlon Brando's eyes"---SliPknot

 

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Hoya carnosa, Hoya obovata, kerryi & carnosa compacta (aka Hindu Rope) all grow outdoors for me year round in Fresno. Shooting Star died when temps went below 40F. 
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On 1/23/2022 at 5:17 AM, metalfan said:

There are no really COLD growing species. As in tolerating the 20-40F range for long periods. Liddle classified them as COOL (50-77F)

 

10 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

Hoya carnosa, Hoya obovata, kerryi & carnosa compacta (aka Hindu Rope) all grow outdoors for me year round in Fresno. Shooting Star died when temps went below 40F.

As Josue can confirm with the species he identifies as growing outside, the key question is what does one mean by 20-40F for "long periods".  I know that Josue sees temps in winter that regularly are going down below 40 overnight.  I see temps dropping below 40 overnight in the winter as well and am growing the same species Josue mentions, which ironically Carlos recommended I start with many years ago as easy growing outside here in Southern California.  The key is probably not staying in that 20-40F for more than just overnight lows.  I know that one of the vendors I get my orchids from uses a similar terminology of "cool, intermediate and warm" growing to describe the best conditions.  I have found that some of the species that grow best in intermediate to warm can grow fine in my outside environment that drops overnight into what would be termed "cool" or even "cold" temps, but because the temps don't stay low as the sun rises, the duration of cool/cold isn't "long".  So it all keys around what one means by "long periods".  I think we are on the same page, but just wanted to clarify we sometimes need to be clear what we are saying when we use terms like "long periods".

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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11 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:
Hoya carnosa, Hoya obovata, kerryi & carnosa compacta (aka Hindu Rope) all grow outdoors for me year round in Fresno. Shooting Star died when temps went below 40F. 

Interesting that Shooting Star bit the dust for you.. Had one in Fl that saw high 30s/ touch of frost on the lawn one winter and didn't seem to flinch..  Wonder if cool + wet soil during the winter is more of a nail in the coffin for this one..  Not having a place set up for them, before our extreme heat arrived the first summer here sure was, for all of them, lol.

Out of all the ones i had, H. carnosa, skinneriana " Dee's Big One ", and publicalyx  definitely seemed to be the easiest. Left a Carnosa at my grandparents in Almaden years ago. Grew like a weed, and never suffered damage is any of the cold spells there ( under their covered patio < north facing > ).  Other two seemed about as temperature tolerant.

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There's a bit of a semantic issue.  Every plant can tolerate a wider range of temps than it will grow in.  For example, assuming optimal drainage/dryness, Hoya kerrii can tolerate cooler temps, but it will only grow in warmer temps.  Hoya carnosa, on the other hand, can tolerate and grow in a much wider range of temps.  

x = temperature tolerance
y = temperature preference 

On the Vermont Hoyas Temperature Tolerance Guide he says, "For example, you would not want to take a warm grower like H. megalaster and expose it to night-time temps in the 35°F range."  He conflates x and y.  I don't have any experience with megalaster, but there shouldn't be a problem exposing a warm grower like kerrii to 35F.  

Admittedly it is a bit awkward to say Hoya kerrii prefers warmer temps but can tolerate cooler temps.  But it is useful to know.  

According to Tropiflora's Instagram this weekend in their Florida area it is going to be in the low 30s.   All their plants can obviously grow in warmer temps, but now the question is which of their plants can tolerate cooler temps.  

Unfortunately I don't think that Tropiflora has many Hoyas, unlike Ric on Youtube who I believe is in St. Petersburg.  Seems like the coldest he will get this weekend is 39F.  It will be interesting to see how his numerous outdoor Hoyas fare.  Last winter he mentioned that some of his Hoyas continued to grow.   These are probably good candidates to try outdoors in my area.  

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13 minutes ago, epiphyte said:

There's a bit of a semantic issue.  Every plant can tolerate a wider range of temps than it will grow in.  For example, assuming optimal drainage/dryness, Hoya kerrii can tolerate cooler temps, but it will only grow in warmer temps.  Hoya carnosa, on the other hand, can tolerate and grow in a much wider range of temps.  

x = temperature tolerance
y = temperature preference 

On the Vermont Hoyas Temperature Tolerance Guide he says, "For example, you would not want to take a warm grower like H. megalaster and expose it to night-time temps in the 35°F range."  He conflates x and y.  I don't have any experience with megalaster, but there shouldn't be a problem exposing a warm grower like kerrii to 35F.  

Admittedly it is a bit awkward to say Hoya kerrii prefers warmer temps but can tolerate cooler temps.  But it is useful to know.  

According to Tropiflora's Instagram this weekend in their Florida area it is going to be in the low 30s.   All their plants can obviously grow in warmer temps, but now the question is which of their plants can tolerate cooler temps.  

Unfortunately I don't think that Tropiflora has many Hoyas, unlike Ric on Youtube who I believe is in St. Petersburg.  Seems like the coldest he will get this weekend is 39F.  It will be interesting to see how his numerous outdoor Hoyas fare.  Last winter he mentioned that some of his Hoyas continued to grow.   These are probably good candidates to try outdoors in my area.  

Tropiflora did carry some ( might still? ).. but nothing special that i really noticed.. There is/was? someone else in Sarasota / Sarasota area that did grow a lot of species.. Might have moved though.

All the ones i had, except for a big leaved, Noid species a customer had shared cuttings of while in FL, came from Kartuz.. No issues fully exposed to heat / cooler periods in the winter sitting on a chain link fence while in Bradenton.   Aridlands has been listing a few so often recently. Need to find a tiny leaved, can't recall the species name of atm again..

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Yes we are getting ready for a night of bad cold that will stretch down all the way to Miami. I have never tried to grow any of my hoya outdoors here in Gainesville. But, as is the way of many older long lived greenhouses, I have had a few plants 'escape' though crevices in the single wall poly carb where the panels overlap. This includes Bauhinia glabra, Amydrium zippelianum, a few different orchid cacti, the Brazilian Dwarf Red Jade vine (Camptostemma) and a few hoyas that grow on the walls of the GH. Even in the occasional low to mid 20's,  none of the escapees have ever died. I presume its because the mass of the plant and its roots are safe inside where its warm, and the escapee portions are pretty much laying on the glazing of the GH outside. SO the few hours it is actually that low don't kill these.

"You can't see California without Marlon Brando's eyes"---SliPknot

 

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  • 10 months later...

Hoya fusca is native to 2,600m (8,528ft)

Hoya siamica is native to 2,500m (8,200ft)

Hoya longifolia is native to 2,400m (7,872ft)

anyone try those outside?

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