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The Anthurium craze and repotting Anthurium magnificum

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piping plovers
1 hour ago, metalfan said:

I have seen it but never collected it. If I am going to spring for another strap leaf, I want an Anthurium wendlingerii

I just looked that one up and I can see why you would want one.  Very nice looking plants.

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metalfan

I have the vittariifolium and the friedrichsthalii, I like them both.

 

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metalfan

One of my forgetii seedlings has produced this wild leaf. I think this may have been pollinated by my A. besseae x magnificum

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piping plovers
25 minutes ago, metalfan said:

One of my forgetii seedlings has produced this wild leaf. I think this may have been pollinated by my A. besseae x magnificum

Real interesting shape and veins.  Does the petiole join the back of the leaf typical to forgetii? Keep us posted on the next leaves.

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metalfan

I have not looked that close these are still pretty small

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metalfan

Also got some kind of aberrant leaves on Anthurium 'Mehani' seedlings. 'Mean' is A. magnificum x (radicans x luxurians) x crystallinum. I put different pollens on these so I have no idea about the pollen parents of individual seedlings....but some of these are developing distinctly frilly leaf margins

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Dypsisdean
On 6/25/2021 at 4:50 AM, metalfan said:

I have seen it but never collected it. If I am going to spring for another strap leaf, I want an Anthurium wendlingerii

Good luck on finding one - they are expensive if you do. And many that you may find are crosses. And unless an expert, hard to tell when young. Only can be sure when flowering.

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Dypsisdean
On 6/25/2021 at 2:01 AM, piping plovers said:

Yes I am guilty of that lol.  Are you familiar with Anthurium pallidiflorum? What do you think of it?  Wondering if it has worthwhile attributes over the vittarifolium.

I would highly recommend the A. pallidiflorum. It has been an easy grow for me after I just stuck it on a old fallen tree fern trunk.

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metalfan

Wendlingerii is pretty common around here, but you are right, it will cost you your first born child, an arm, AND a leg

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Dartolution

Here are a couple of newly acquired warocqueanums and a new leaf on a no-id I have that is really stunning when it produces new leaves. 

My big crystal is pushing out a couple of leaves and a flower at the moment. Warocqueanum2.thumb.jpg.73305e1604e7b3927bf87a2242857547.jpgWarocqueanum1.thumb.jpg.60a2ef335c16a46add4bb1cb3a11c755.jpgAnthuriumnoid1.thumb.jpg.79d4d7ca9cda2f234b6a91121c189b13.jpg

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piping plovers
10 hours ago, Dartolution said:

Here are a couple of newly acquired warocqueanums and a new leaf on a no-id I have that is really stunning when it produces new

Impressive leaves on that warocqueanum!  I just purchased a 2nd one myself.

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metalfan

Mine is having a great summer. I think I managed to pollinate 2 spadices of Anthurium pedatoradiatum with Waroc pollen from this plant 

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Dartolution

@metalfan cant quite tell, but is the Waroc growing on the coconut pole? 

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metalfan

@Dartolutionyes, it is mossed and attached to the totem. As new roots emerge along the meristem, I moss them onto the pole and keep the entire thing moist. This waroq has been maintained in straight sphagnum moss for its entire life. Its potted in a basket with a coir liner and moss. If I evened to change the basket to replace media, like a new liner, I can have an assistant hold the container, remove a concrete block under it, slip off the old basket and replace with a new liner. I also have other plants growing in the same basket in the same moss....Philodendron gigas, and Philodendron "Splendid'. The pole is a double pole, each pole is made from the jumbo size 10 ft PVC pipes used in septic drainage fields

 

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metalfan

Looking at my Splendid photo I realize I need to do some missing on the waroq LOL

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Dartolution

I see! Mine are potted in a 50/50 mix of special orchid mix (bark, charcoal, chunky perlite) and long fiber sphagnum. 

I basically use that mix with osmocote plus for all my anthurium and orchids. 

I've got a melanochrysum that I grew out over the winter. It suffered root rot at some point *soil was too dense and wet*, so this spring I chopped the whole thing up into 1 node sections and rooted them in sphagnum. I need to do something with them pretty soon. 

I've had a hard time with that melano. They seem to suffer root rot no matter what I do. 

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metalfan

I got a straight melon in a trade a few months ago. The lady who traded it to me is local, she actually owns a houseplant shop...she pots everything based on people growing them as houseplants,  not on someone like me who waters everything with a hose most every day LOL. So she uses a ground coco coir (Think Eco Earth reptile substrate)  and peat mix...??? I had it for a day, didn;t even water it,  and the newest emergent leaf came out yellow and yucky, pulled it out of the pot and there was some root rot. Trimmed it, placed it in straight sphagnum, and this is it now(2nd photo) First photo is Philo 'Glorious'. 

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Dartolution

I'll likely pot it up in the mix I mentioned above since yours is in straight sphagnum. 

I guess they like epiphytic conditions.

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aussiearoids

Fantastic to see vittariifolium spelt correctly .. So sad how google gets it wrong , and the sneering replies I get when I try and correct everyone.

Seems the second i is invisible ..vitarii - folium .. first noticed it by how a mate said the name vit-tra-folium ... NO its vit ar ey i folium

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piping plovers
7 minutes ago, aussiearoids said:

Fantastic to see vittariifolium spelt correctly .. So sad how google gets it wrong , and the sneering replies I get when I try and correct everyone.

Thanks for confirming that.  I’ve seen so many different spellings.  And the two ii s Just look Correct anyhow. For reference, would Love to have a hard cover copy of the exotic plant manual handy, oldy but goody.  Internet info can be so iffy on accuracy in these areas.

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piping plovers

I just received my first order from ecuagenera in South America.  My four plants were a good value.  The Anthurium pendens Ecuagenera was an impressive size for mail order, one leaf approx 3 ft long.  Photo below of the pendens along with a pallidiflorum seedling. 

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metalfan

Just wondering.....you can PM me if you don;t want to post it here...how much did you pay for the Pendulifolia, and how much was the shipping from Ecuador for all 3? I am asking because there is a branch of Ecuagenera 2 hours from me. I go there a few times a year. They have the same plants, and the shipping one day UPS is the same as USPS priority by 10 cents over. Of course if I wasn;t lazy I would pick up my plants but....

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metalfan

Just an interesting thing....I always push the zone here to see what I can get away with. Last winter when we had the Arctic Express, we had 2 nights of 25F back to back. I had thrown these seed grown bird nest anthuriums out in toe yard because I had too many and they were taking up valuable greenhouse space. I just set them out in their original pots/baskets and walked off. They not only survived the freeze intact, but with all the rain we have had this summer so far, they have become very happy. This is an L shaped alcove between 2 house walls, western facing. Makes a nice microclimate

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piping plovers
1 hour ago, metalfan said:

Just wondering.....you can PM me if you don;t want to post it here...how much did you pay for the Pendulifolia, and how much was the shipping from Ecuador for all 3? I am asking because there is a branch of Ecuagenera 2 hours from me. I go there a few times a year. They have the same plants, and the shipping one day UPS is the same as USPS priority by 10 cents over. Of course if I wasn;t lazy I would pick up my plants but....

Sure. So, the large pendens was $75 and the pallidiflorum seedling was $50. On their website they are still listed at these prices and once you add to shopping cart they include the shipping as well.  My shipping to New England/ north east US  was $19 for 4 plants and I paid for a 2 day ups shipping upgrade of additional $26. Even with all that shipping I feel was a good value as a pendens of that size if I could find it online in the USA would be greater than $350.  For me It’s just the cost of doing business so far removed from the tropics.  Since you’re in FL(?) or driving distance your baseline shipping’s likely lower and you won’t need the express upgrade.  Also, I believe you can order from ecuagenera’s ecquador site and pick up at the Florida location. Just FYI, Website charges a PayPal fee as well. The large box they sent could fit more than 4 plants, so better to add more to make shipping worth it.  Photo on porch.0F8C40E1-69E1-49E5-8358-EEC258047495.thumb.jpeg.2c3bb2454c8aeeb4c30b70f6de2ba72a.jpeg

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metalfan

I get UPS next day from them at only 10 cents more than USPS 2 day priority. Under $9 for both. I have ordered many things from them. In fact I have a few orchids coming next week. Its really more fun to go down there and pick out your stuff, but at a 4 hour round trip I have to limit myself LOL I have a husband a daughter and 3 dogs to take care of. I usually go in person for the times when my purchases are going to be a 'gift' from my hubby...for birthday, anniversary, Xmas or Mother's Day. They do do a little mark up on plants that are sold here win FL, because they acclimate them for a week or 2 before they sell them. I have been there when they received a shipment...and watched the process of unpacking and potting up.

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idesign123

Hello - I've been enjoying reading this thread and am considering placing an order from Ecuagenera South America, since they'll be at a plant show near me in a couple months (and they wouldn't charge for shipping if I pick my order up at the show). Only issue is that I'm brand new to Anthuriums. I included two A. pseudospectabile in my Floribunda order though, so I'll need to get up to speed either way.  I'm relatively experienced in growing bromeliads, so thinking I might be able handle adding these (though will obviously take more care than most bromeliads).

Can someone please recommend a list of possible plants I should include in my Ecuagenera order?

  • I live in a relatively plant-friendly zone (10a), but it's California not Florida, so less humid
  • I would like to grow them outdoors (in a covered frost-free location), but can bring them indoors a couple months of the year if needed. Ideal would be if I could leave them outside though.
  • I love the look of the dark "velvet" ones best, but am open to any type. Would love to get at least one "velvet", and at least one that's long and skinny. 

From this thread + my own research I have the following on my list as possibilities (though I'm open to other ideas)...
A. crystillanum
A. forgetii
A. magnificum
A. pallidiflorum
A. pedatoradiatum
A. pendens
A. vittariifolium
A. warocqueanum
A. wendlingerii

Recommendations? And while I'm at it, are there any orchids or philodendrons I should add to my order that might survive outdoors (protected) year round?

* I'd like to try orchids at some point, but am at square one there. Already have a few philodendrons, including a couple rare ones like "Prince of Orange". Mostly looking at the anthuriums, but thinking I might add orchids and/or philodendrons to the order if there's any that would work outside year round.

Thanks for any advice on what I should order!

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waykoolplantz

it was great to see Rob Branch yeasterday at the Searle sale...he stopped by and liked one of my plants..so i gavehim a cuttin of Orange Marmalade

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Silas_Sancona
4 hours ago, idesign123 said:

 


* I'd like to try orchids at some point, but am at square one there. Already have a few philodendrons, including a couple rare ones like "Prince of Orange". Mostly looking at the anthuriums, but thinking I might add orchids and/or philodendrons to the order if there's any that would work outside year round.

Thanks for any advice on what I should order!

Can't speak for Anthuriums but you might look at the Stanhopea they offer.. Usually harder to find species. Might be over in the Orchid thread but posted a link to a really good  article written by someone thee in San Diego  regarding the species that will survive outdoors there. Have seen some harder to find ( via California sources ) Sobralia / other neat Orchids on their site as well. 

When looking at species ( from them or other places ) anything that will tolerate cool to intermediate conditions ( Places like Santa Barbara Orchid Estate will often use the term " Temperature Tolerant " for such species / hybrids ) Some warm growers can be placed outside thru the summer, moved somewhere warmer in winter ( enclosed patio / greenhouse ).

Most other Orchids that will fare well there should be pretty easy to track down through local / nearby nurseries /growers. 

 

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metalfan
2 hours ago, waykoolplantz said:

it was great to see Rob Branch yeasterday at the Searle sale...he stopped by and liked one of my plants..so i gavehim a cuttin of Orange Marmalade

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We went to one of his sales (pre-covid when Ariel was still a student at Ringling) and it was pretty great (and I mean PRETTY AWESOME DAMN GREAT) seeing his place. Its my dream to have some of the palms and the things he has planted out. You are a BEAST, you know I would LOVE to have even a tiny cutting or Orange Marmalade!

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metalfan

@idesign123from your list, and having lived in California where I know that the humidity can sometimes be iffy (do you have REAL humidity there, or just the Marine Layer?) I would advise you to steer clear of anything that is really epiphytic. From your list, the things that I would consider to be that way are pendens, pallidiflorum,  wendlingerim, vittariifolium, and warocqueanum. Mainly because, those plants do a lot better than others mounted or semi mounted, or in very loose media. I grow war and and pendent and vittariifolium mounted. That requires high humidity. You don;t HAVE to grow the same way, but they really like it.

I would really research orchids before you jump in with Ecuagenera's orchids. Many of them are actually cloud forest species and not tolerant of dryness or high heat. I grow those in a terrarium.

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idesign123

Thanks "Silas_Sancona" and "metalfan" for the hardiness advice! I think I'll just steer clear of the orchids for now (esp for outside)... and do more research on the anthurium types before buying. I might get more adventurous later, but my priority at the moment should be outdoor-compatible plants.

@metalfan To make sure I'm clear... your advice was that pendens, pallidiflorum, etc. were the ones that are NOT likely to do well in areas with lower humidity, correct (i.e., put on my "do not buy" list)? Just want to make sure I didn't have the two groups mixed up.

Sounds like it's not likely that I'll find an anthurium variety that works great in outdoor coastal California, but it was worth asking. Crotons and Heliconias are the same way... not ideal for California, but I have a couple varieties of each that will grow for me. Hoping to find a couple Anthurium types that might survive here, but if not that's ok too. Guess that's why most of the posters on this thread are from Florida :unsure:

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piping plovers
On 7/23/2021 at 8:28 AM, metalfan said:

Just an interesting thing....I always push the zone here to see what I can get away with. Last winter when we had the Arctic Express, we had 2 nights of 25F back to back. I had thrown these seed grown bird nest anthuriums out in toe yard because I had too many and they were taking up valuable greenhouse space. I just set them out in their original pots/baskets and walked off. They not only survived the freeze intact, but with all the rain we have had this summer so far, they have become very happy. This is an L shaped alcove between 2 house walls, western facing. Makes a nice microclimate

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Amazing that they survived those cold temps.  You know where are talking anthuriums and other exotics when even the FL growers are using a microclimate to push zones.  :)

Those birdnests actually look more attractive i think as the seedling stage that you have.  I had a real large one 30 years ago and it was just too big, like a fiddle leaf fig - big brittle leaves.  I think I left it out for the winter one year because I only had so much room indoors.

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piping plovers
On 7/23/2021 at 2:50 PM, metalfan said:

I get UPS next day from them at only 10 cents more than USPS 2 day priority. Under $9 for both. I have ordered many things from them. In fact I have a few orchids coming next week. Its really more fun to go down there and pick out your stuff, but at a 4 hour round trip I have to limit myself LOL I have a husband a daughter and 3 dogs to take care of. I usually go in person for the times when my purchases are going to be a 'gift' from my hubby...for birthday, anniversary, Xmas or Mother's Day. They do do a little mark up on plants that are sold here win FL, because they acclimate them for a week or 2 before they sell them. I have been there when they received a shipment...and watched the process of unpacking and potting up.

Sounds like you trained them well on the best gifts for special occaisons.  With those reduced shipping costs that is quite a better deal.  I watched a youtube video recently,  a FL collector of anthuriums, etc; she said the annoying part of visiting the FL location is that many plants were not priced.  After going through effort of choosing best plants and then getting a shocking $$price at the register.  I think she also had a 4 hour round trip as well. Still is more fun to look at a nursery than online.

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piping plovers
9 hours ago, idesign123 said:

Hello - I've been enjoying reading this thread and am considering placing an order from Ecuagenera South America, since they'll be at a plant show near me in a couple months (and they wouldn't charge for shipping if I pick my order up at the show). Only issue is that I'm brand new to Anthuriums. I included two A. pseudospectabile in my Floribunda order though, so I'll need to get up to speed either way.  I'm relatively experienced in growing bromeliads, so thinking I might be able handle adding these (though will obviously take more care than most bromeliads).

Can someone please recommend a list of possible plants I should include in my Ecuagenera order?

  • I live in a relatively plant-friendly zone (10a), but it's California not Florida, so less humid
  • I would like to grow them outdoors (in a covered frost-free location), but can bring them indoors a couple months of the year if needed. Ideal would be if I could leave them outside though.
  • I love the look of the dark "velvet" ones best, but am open to any type. Would love to get at least one "velvet", and at least one that's long and skinny. 

From this thread + my own research I have the following on my list as possibilities (though I'm open to other ideas)...
A. crystillanum
A. forgetii
A. magnificum
A. pallidiflorum
A. pedatoradiatum
A. pendens
A. vittariifolium
A. warocqueanum
A. wendlingerii

Recommendations? And while I'm at it, are there any orchids or philodendrons I should add to my order that might survive outdoors (protected) year round?

* I'd like to try orchids at some point, but am at square one there. Already have a few philodendrons, including a couple rare ones like "Prince of Orange". Mostly looking at the anthuriums, but thinking I might add orchids and/or philodendrons to the order if there's any that would work outside year round.

Thanks for any advice on what I should order!

I composed my list after viewing many videos and taking note of the ones that consistently appealed to me.  Being from the northeast USA/new england area I obviously made decisions based on houseplant/sunroom culture rather than outdoors culture as you are considering.  A. clarinervium is the only one on my list that is not on your list but I think we have basically the same list.  I noticed that my sunroom would register humidity between the 30% - 50% range during the coldest drier winter months and I did not notice any foliage damage on leaves that developed fully under my care.  One thing I've noticed in PalmTalk is that even the palms that you think would demand high humidity indoors (Johannesteigsmannia, and licuala, etc) actually will do okay in lower humidity as long as they are watered correctly.  I grow these palms in the same sunroom and have no leaf damage even with the lowest humidity levels in winter.  The biggest issue I am seeing for anthuriums as houseplants is not the humidity but over watering - seems a common theme on any of the youtube vids you see posted on their care.  So, you should try to see if you can grow them outdoors and perhaps give them a microclimate that would boost humidity.  Maybe a small birdbath-like pool with mister or circulating pump for low fountain? 55 degrees F seems to be the lowest temp they should be exposed to.  Someone mentioned on here that A. forgetii was the most forgiving of those on our similar list.  Also, I wonder if clarinervium and crystallinum would be considered less epiphytic types and maybe more tolerant of lower humidity.

Also, on the ecuagenara orchids - I ordered a few Mexican species that may be fine for CA.  I think Silas mentioned Stanhopea (i am waiting on one next week) and I also ordered Brassia gireoudiana (Mexico or close?), and Cattlleya trianae (South America).  

 

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Silas_Sancona
54 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

I composed my list after viewing many videos and taking note of the ones that consistently appealed to me.  Being from the northeast USA/new england area I obviously made decisions based on houseplant/sunroom culture rather than outdoors culture as you are considering.  A. clarinervium is the only one on my list that is not on your list but I think we have basically the same list.  I noticed that my sunroom would register humidity between the 30% - 50% range during the coldest drier winter months and I did not notice any foliage damage on leaves that developed fully under my care.  One thing I've noticed in PalmTalk is that even the palms that you think would demand high humidity indoors (Johannesteigsmannia, and licuala, etc) actually will do okay in lower humidity as long as they are watered correctly.  I grow these palms in the same sunroom and have no leaf damage even with the lowest humidity levels in winter.  The biggest issue I am seeing for anthuriums as houseplants is not the humidity but over watering - seems a common theme on any of the youtube vids you see posted on their care.  So, you should try to see if you can grow them outdoors and perhaps give them a microclimate that would boost humidity.  Maybe a small birdbath-like pool with mister or circulating pump for low fountain? 55 degrees F seems to be the lowest temp they should be exposed to.  Someone mentioned on here that A. forgetii was the most forgiving of those on our similar list.  Also, I wonder if clarinervium and crystallinum would be considered less epiphytic types and maybe more tolerant of lower humidity.

Also, on the ecuagenara orchids - I ordered a few Mexican species that may be fine for CA.  I think Silas mentioned Stanhopea (i am waiting on one next week) and I also ordered Brassia gireoudiana (Mexico or close?), and Cattlleya trianae (South America).  

 

Agree, think there would be at least a couple worth trialing outdoors ..or at least under a covered patio- in San Diego, likely other spots around S. Cal. ( Carlos,  @epiphyte  ..any  thoughts???  ) ..esp if taking advantage of any potential micro climate on the property, and a misting / dripper system ..much the same way some people get away with some orchids many people assume wouldn't grow outdoors -for any length of time - there.

Good majority or Orchids from Mexico, esp. those from the mountains / transition zone areas do quite well in CA.. same w/ many things from the subtropical parts of S. America / S.E. Asia.. List i'd put together, based on climate research/ looking at what temps. they can handle alone, was much more extensive than i'd assumed it would be.. and that's excluding the countless Cattleya and Laelia crosses / selected forms, ..or Cymbidiums / Australian Dendrobiums.. 

True, true blue Cloud forest and ultra tropical stuff ( majority of Orchids listed as " warm / hot -growing " ) can be touchy, depending on where it originates but plenty of options to fill a yard for sure. Think i'd even read something where a grower was able to grow a couple of the Lady Slipper- type Orchids ( in pots ) outdoors all year under a partially enclosed Patio.

@piping plovers You'll definitely love your Stanhopea ( and likely want more, esp. once yours starts flowering.. ) Outdoors in San Diego, definitely want to take advantage of tree canopy ( even the hardiest need some degree of shade )  Even out of flower, the large, Hosta-like leaves, esp. on large specimens adds a tropical touch to the garden.

Re- Link to the article again, at least the Temp. requirements sited by the grower. other posts can be viewed as well: https://stanhopeaculture.blogspot.com/2013/01/stanhopea-temperature-requirements_26.html

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metalfan
13 hours ago, piping plovers said:

Sounds like you trained them well on the best gifts for special occaisons.  With those reduced shipping costs that is quite a better deal.  I watched a youtube video recently,  a FL collector of anthuriums, etc; she said the annoying part of visiting the FL location is that many plants were not priced.  After going through effort of choosing best plants and then getting a shocking $$price at the register.  I think she also had a 4 hour round trip as well. Still is more fun to look at a nursery than online.

They will give you a current price sheet if you ask for it either before you go or when you get there.

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metalfan

The ones I have bought from Ecuagenera (the orchids) were all for my terrariums with the exception of some bulbophyllums, which will do totally fine out in my oh so hot and steamy greenhouse. The heat out there would kill the cool growing plants like the very lovely Dendrobium cuthbertsoniis that I would really like to have. The heat would also kill Phrags. They sell a lot of Phrags I think but they keep them in a climate controlled greenhouse that I have never gone in, because I know I cannot grow them. You have to watch out also for high elevation anthuriums....I have an A metallicum and an A draconopterum that are not totally happy in the heat out there...we have not had the long strings of 95-98F days that we had last summer yet, we have been more 88-92 or so. If it gets hotter in August and September I will have to bring those 2 indoors to my sunporch like I did last year. They are really happy out there in winter when the temps are more like 80. I make it a point to really research the provenance of the plants that I buy, so that I don;t get something I know I will be wasting my $$ on. I read the data that tells me where the plants were originally collected in the wild, the elevation, etc, how they grow (epiphyte vs semi-epiphyte vs lithophyte vs terrestrial vs rheophyte) before I buy anything. I have learned over the past 30 years that not doing that sort of research leads to wasted time and money. I bought an Anthurium splendidum years ago and stuck it out in the greenhouse and it promptly melted. The humidity even at 80+ % was ok but the heat got it. Now I have one in the house under glass in 100% sealed conditions and its flourishing

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piping plovers
On 7/25/2021 at 12:32 AM, Silas_Sancona said:

Agree, think there would be at least a couple worth trialing outdoors ..or at least under a covered patio- in San Diego, likely other spots around S. Cal. ( Carlos,  @epiphyte  ..any  thoughts???  ) ..esp if taking advantage of any potential micro climate on the property, and a misting / dripper system ..much the same way some people get away with some orchids many people assume wouldn't grow outdoors -for any length of time - there.

Good majority or Orchids from Mexico, esp. those from the mountains / transition zone areas do quite well in CA.. same w/ many things from the subtropical parts of S. America / S.E. Asia.. List i'd put together, based on climate research/ looking at what temps. they can handle alone, was much more extensive than i'd assumed it would be.. and that's excluding the countless Cattleya and Laelia crosses / selected forms, ..or Cymbidiums / Australian Dendrobiums.. 

True, true blue Cloud forest and ultra tropical stuff ( majority of Orchids listed as " warm / hot -growing " ) can be touchy, depending on where it originates but plenty of options to fill a yard for sure. Think i'd even read something where a grower was able to grow a couple of the Lady Slipper- type Orchids ( in pots ) outdoors all year under a partially enclosed Patio.

@piping plovers You'll definitely love your Stanhopea ( and likely want more, esp. once yours starts flowering.. ) Outdoors in San Diego, definitely want to take advantage of tree canopy ( even the hardiest need some degree of shade )  Even out of flower, the large, Hosta-like leaves, esp. on large specimens adds a tropical touch to the garden.

Re- Link to the article again, at least the Temp. requirements sited by the grower. other posts can be viewed as well: https://stanhopeaculture.blogspot.com/2013/01/stanhopea-temperature-requirements_26.html

Silas, I like that comparison to the Hosta.  That's what I think of when I see healthy well-grown foliage on those.  I've only seen them in botanic gardens and when I do I'm thinking  whoa - there's a serious horticulturist on premises - these epiphytic plants in baskets are so exotic looking.  I mostly see the stanhopeas grown in wire baskets and I can certainly understand why with their flowering habit.  I see them less in wooden "vanda" baskets; does the wooden basket present too many obtstacles for the flowering spikes or is that a rare concern?  My stanhopea arrives from ecuagenera tomorrow and I have many wooden baskets but not the right sized wire baskets on hand.

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Silas_Sancona
20 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Silas, I like that comparison to the Hosta.  That's what I think of when I see healthy well-grown foliage on those.  I've only seen them in botanic gardens and when I do I'm thinking  whoa - there's a serious horticulturist on premises - these epiphytic plants in baskets are so exotic looking.  I mostly see the stanhopeas grown in wire baskets and I can certainly understand why with their flowering habit.  I see them less in wooden "vanda" baskets; does the wooden basket present too many obtstacles for the flowering spikes or is that a rare concern?  My stanhopea arrives from ecuagenera tomorrow and I have many wooden baskets but not the right sized wire baskets on hand.

Interesting.. Specimens i've seen in displays were all in wooden baskets, many of them square, rather than wire baskets... or sold ( seedlings / small divisions ) in those plastic, net-type pots at plant sales.   While either of the 3 works, each option has it's pros and cons.

Here's a link to another article ( this time related to ideal containers ) from the author i'd linked to before:  http://stanhopeaculture.blogspot.com/2013/03/stanhopea-containers.html


This is another article in the series the author had put together related to getting them to bloom as best as possible worth looking over: http://stanhopeaculture.blogspot.com/2013/01/why-wont-my-stanhopea-bloom.html

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piping plovers
4 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Interesting.. Specimens i've seen in displays were all in wooden baskets, many of them square, rather than wire baskets... or sold ( seedlings / small divisions ) in those plastic, net-type pots at plant sales.   While either of the 3 works, each option has it's pros and cons.

Here's a link to another article ( this time related to ideal containers ) from the author i'd linked to before:  http://stanhopeaculture.blogspot.com/2013/03/stanhopea-containers.html


This is another article in the series the author had put together related to getting them to bloom as best as possible worth looking over: http://stanhopeaculture.blogspot.com/2013/01/why-wont-my-stanhopea-bloom.html

Ah, fantastic.  Thanks Silas for providing those links.  I'll read through those to give my first-ever stanhopea the best chance for thriving!

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