Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Reyes Vargas

Cactus identification help

Recommended Posts

Reyes Vargas

I need help in identifying a cactus that I found growing under one of my Mesquite tree.  Thanks.

20210113_133304.jpg

20210113_133312.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amh

Possibly Acanthocereus tetragonus if native or a Cereus volunteer.

Any more pictures?

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
13 minutes ago, Reyes Vargas said:

I need help in identifying a cactus that I found growing under one of my Mesquite tree.  Thanks.

20210113_133304.jpg

20210113_133312.jpg

Pretty certain this is Acanthocereus tetragonus, Triangle Cactus. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reyes Vargas
3 minutes ago, amh said:

Possibly Acanthocereus tetragonus if native or a Cereus volunteer.

Any more pictures?

That's all the pictures I have but I can take more if you need.  I did a quick Google search and it does look like Acanthocereus tetragonus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amh
Just now, Reyes Vargas said:

That's all the pictures I have but I can take more if you need.  I did a quick Google search and it does look like Acanthocereus tetragonus.

Its more than likely Acanthocereus tetragonus, but I've had cereus seedlings that have looked very similar.

This is a great example of the ecological benefits of large mesquite trees, I check mine for interesting seedlings all the time.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reyes Vargas
6 minutes ago, amh said:

Its more than likely Acanthocereus tetragonus, but I've had cereus seedlings that have looked very similar.

This is a great example of the ecological benefits of large mesquite trees, I check mine for interesting seedlings all the time.

Here are a couple more pictures I don't know if they will help you.  Acanthocereus tetragonus are native to my area so it's more than likely those.  Thanks for All the help you too @Silas_Sancona

20210113_143458.jpg

20210113_143522.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amh

Really looks like Acanthocereus tetragonus. Keep an eye out for flowers and fruit.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, Reyes Vargas said:

Here are a couple more pictures I don't know if they will help you.  Acanthocereus tetragonus are native to my area so it's more than likely those.  Thanks for All the help you too @Silas_Sancona

20210113_143458.jpg

20210113_143522.jpg

:greenthumb: Appreciate the thumbs up..  definitely a Triangle cactus..  Spines located closest to the base of the plant are exactly like the one i have out front here though it doesn't produce central spines quite as long as yours. Fruit is edible supposedly but not sure how good it is. Mine doesn't produce though.. Flowers, when you catch them blooming, are spectacular..

Some pictures of the flowers on mine from back in May of 2018:
DSCN3872.thumb.JPG.10d925ff63abc8201c110f2a5f41ade3.JPG

DSCN3880.thumb.JPG.d4966c5dcaa5f20635853e166caf8559.JPG

DSCN3882.JPG.327ce201e79e1c394b0729ebe031e17f.JPG

DSCN3893.JPG.0d63b038ec5b138564ad149622f4e2e0.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reyes Vargas

Do you know how big they have to be before they flower?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reyes Vargas
3 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

:greenthumb: Appreciate the thumbs up..  definitely a Triangle cactus..  Spines located closest to the base of the plant are exactly like the one i have out front here though it doesn't produce central spines quite as long as yours. Fruit is edible supposedly but not sure how good it is. Mine doesn't produce though.. Flowers, when you catch them blooming, are spectacular..

Some pictures of the flowers on mine from back in May of 2018:
DSCN3872.thumb.JPG.10d925ff63abc8201c110f2a5f41ade3.JPG

DSCN3880.thumb.JPG.d4966c5dcaa5f20635853e166caf8559.JPG

DSCN3882.JPG.327ce201e79e1c394b0729ebe031e17f.JPG

DSCN3893.JPG.0d63b038ec5b138564ad149622f4e2e0.JPG

Those are nice can't wait for mine to flower.  Do you know how big they have to be before they flower.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, Reyes Vargas said:

Do you know how big they have to be before they flower?

That one will probably take a couple years to reach flowering size.. though i'm basing that on how the one here grows.. New stems on it usually flower a year after being produced.  There, the extra humidity + heat + rainfall in summer will likely make it grow a lot faster.. Mine explodes once monsoon season starts. I'll also see it flower 2-3x's a year if conditions are favorable. You may see flowers on and off from say May- November under your conditions.. Last exactly one night though.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
4 minutes ago, amh said:

Are these manageable in containers?

Yes, but you'll need something big in time.. and will likely have to trim occasionally.  As "thin " as the stems look, they're pretty heavy ( short, but stumpy spines surprisingly painful, lol ).  Treat it like you would Dragon Fruit.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amh
Just now, Silas_Sancona said:

Yes, but you'll need something big in time.. and will likely have to trim occasionally.  As "thin " as the stems look, they're pretty heavy ( short, but stumpy spines surprisingly painful, lol ).  Treat it like you would Dragon Fruit.

Okay, I've been thinking about growing these, but I didn't know if containers were a long term option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reyes Vargas
6 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Last exactly one night though

So these are night bloomers?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
Just now, Reyes Vargas said:

So these are night bloomers?

Yes, ..Bat pollinated supposedly, though i'd bet Hawk Moths also pollinate them as well.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
57 minutes ago, amh said:

 

This is a great example of the ecological benefits of large mesquite trees, I check mine for interesting seedlings all the time.

Agree.. After living here and having the opportunity to take a hands on look at how much Mesquites influence  ..pretty much everything in their environment, no doubt they're extremely important " key stone " tree in arid environments. Not sure which sp. the big one in my back yard is but collected a ton of seed off it to plant / pass around later. 

May be a rarely seen sp. from Central Mexico since it looks nothing like any of our native species, let alone all the Argentine/Chilean Mesquite planted here, and was supposedly brought here ( as seed i believe ) by the former owner off the house, from somewhere in Mexico.  Foliage on a seedling of it i planted turns quite blue during the summer as well.

If i were in CA. w/ the same tree in my yard, i'd be attaching all sorts of Orchids/Bromeliads to it..

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amh
Just now, Silas_Sancona said:

Agree.. After living here and having the opportunity to take a hands on look at how much Mesquites influence  ..pretty much everything in their environment, no doubt they're extremely important " key stone " tree in arid environments. Not sure which sp. the big one in my back yard is but collected a ton of seed off it to plant / pass around later. 

May be a rarely seen sp. from Central Mexico since it looks nothing like any of our native species, let alone all the Argentine/Chilean Mesquite planted here, and was supposedly brought here ( as seed i believe ) by the former owner off the house, from somewhere in Mexico.  Foliage on a seedling of it i planted turns quite blue during the summer as well.

If i were in CA. w/ the same tree in my yard, i'd be attaching all sorts of Orchids/Bromeliads to it..

Not familiar with the species you are describing, but I have trouble identifying the species that are native to Texas.

On an interesting side note, the mesquite trees are the best indicator for the end of freezes. Once the mesquites bud out in spring, it's safe to plant your garden.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
5 minutes ago, amh said:

Not familiar with the species you are describing, but I have trouble identifying the species that are native to Texas.

On an interesting side note, the mesquite trees are the best indicator for the end of freezes. Once the mesquites bud out in spring, it's safe to plant your garden.

My thinking is Prosopis laevigata from Central Mex.  ..but planning on sending pics to some people associated with the U. of AZ / Desert Legume Program who have studied the Genus more.  Leafs out ( even though it rarely looses all of it's leaves here during the winter ) by mid-march, and flowers before all other Mesquites locally ( right around the same time as it leafs out ) and has never suffered any wind-related damage from Monsoon storms.  If it is a specimen of our common, local sp., P. velutina, it is the biggest of that species i have seen. 

Did a thread on it /other Mesquites back in June of 2018.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amh
7 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

My thinking is Prosopis laevigata from Central Mex.  ..but planning on sending pics to some people associated with the U. of AZ / Desert Legume Program who have studied the Genus more.  Leafs out ( even though it rarely looses all of it's leaves here during the winter ) by mid-march, and flowers before all other Mesquites locally ( right around the same time as it leafs out ) and has never suffered any wind-related damage from Monsoon storms.  If it is a specimen of our common, local sp., P. velutina, it is the biggest of that species i have seen. 

Did a thread on it /other Mesquites back in June of 2018.

I'll have to read that thread.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reyes Vargas
3 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Not sure which sp. the big one in my back yard is but collected a ton of seed off it to plant / pass around later. 

If you still have seeds from your Mesquite tree I would like to buy some from you.  I like Mesquite trees.  No matter how dry the year is they always look good.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
5 minutes ago, Reyes Vargas said:

If you still have seeds from your Mesquite tree I would like to buy some from you.  I like Mesquite trees.  No matter how dry the year is they always look good.

No need to purchase, i send seeds for free..  Send me a message w/ me your address when you get a chance..  Aside from how the tree looks -compared to all the other mesquite around here, Pods on this tree are quite sweet. Want to eventually use for Syrup/ Flour-like meal for making stuff.. ( lots of great recipes, if you've never researched Mesquite Flour/ Honey / Syrup )  That said, how sweet pods can be can vary a bit between individual trees.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...