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DoomsDave

Parajubaea cocoides

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DoomsDave

Two in the ground, about 3 feet tall, going pinnate, four solid nights of rowdy 28-29 FF (-1 C) no damage, so far, even as Kentiopsis scorched . . . .

dave

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JEFF IN MODESTO

My Parajubea Cococodes did show some freeze damage to some leaves, limited though.

Modesto official low 23f... My garden low 26f.

jeff

fp.JPG

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Jim in Los Altos

No damage to speak of on my exposed 4' tall pinnate one with a low of 26.5F.

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PalmGuyWC

Parajubaea cococides:  10' of trunk. prob. largest in East Bay under light overhead protection.  Lower leaf blades desiccated and looking worse every day.  Min temp. 23F to 24F.

From previous experience, anything below 25F causes foliage damage, but the tree will survive much lower temps.

Dick

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PalmGuyWC

East Bay:  I meant east of the Oakland Hills and away from the Bay.

Dick

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DoomsDave

Four long nasty 28=29 F nights, no frost, no damage, hail Mary!

post-208-1170027021_thumb.jpg

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ghar41

I'm really impressed how well P. cocoides (beleived to be the least freeze tolerant in the genus) survived the freeze.  Mine is planted on a southeast facing wall, and has continued to grow slowly since January.

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STEVE IN SO CAL

Two plants (double), 4' OA height

22f, multiple hours and nights below freezing, near house, King palm canopy.

No Damage

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Kostas

My larger Parajubaea cocoides at its 8th(or maybe 9th-10th) leaf,dead after seeing at least -6 for many nights and several days of -3 day tempratures protected in an unheated diy greenhouse whose temprature of course equalized soon as it was a persistent freeze....Spear not pulled but all brown with still not even the slightest growth so most likely dead....

DSC02650a.jpg

2 other Parajubaea cocoides,at only their 3rd leaf,endured the same conditions with the above plants in the same unheated greenhouse,side by side

1 completely defoliated and with spear browning too,continued normal growth from that very spear as inside the pseudotrunk created by the leaves,the spear was still alive!The new green part of the spear separated itself from the dead,brown one and the leaf opened normaly.Completely recovered now!

A photo of the fallen brown spear...

DSC02648a.jpg

And the new half leaf...

DSC02647a.jpg

The other one was defoliated too but the emerging leaf survived with not much damage.

DSC02645a.jpg

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Brahea Axel

I have a whole jungle of parajubaeas, it's the main focal palm in my garden. I was disappointed to find out that p. cocoides leaves are rather fragile and begin to show signs of burn around 28-29F once way up high off the ground.

My oldest p. cocoides grown from Oakland Palmetum seeds has 6 feet of trunk and the fronds have cleared all canopy. I never saw any damage on it from 28-29F until the crown moved high enough from the ground. I also have one of the oldest p. torallyi var. torallyi in California, planted from a 5 gallon pot in 1998. (Seed with pronounced razor blade-style ridges, like something out of a sci-fi movie.)

In January 2012, we had two days of freezing weather. The graphs from our garden's Wunderground station are shown below for both days. Day 1 had 2-3 hours below freezing, with a brief dip to 28.5F. Day 2 was not colder, still only down to 28.4F but the cold was for much longer: 9 hours below freezing, with 4-5 hours below 30F. Note that the station is in the lower garden, 6 feet off the ground, without any nearby trees or structures. it also runs 1.5F colder than actual temperature. So it wasn't quite this cold. Yet p. cocoides has 10% leaf burn. It's not visible from far away, but close up, you can see it. There is nothing hardy about p. cocoides. The fronds are about as hardy as my king palms, which actually showed less damage. The cold wasn't even enough to damage my mountain papayas, which defoliated, but there was no growing wood loss.

This same freeze didn't even touch my tropical guavas, cherimoyas, and all my avocados, (including Hass and Fuerte) sailed right through un-touched as well.

Other p. cocoides with 2 feet or less of trunk showed no damage, apparently radiation from the ground kept fronds warmer.

P. torallyi var torallyi, on the other hand was completely untouched, no sign of any damage, and it's rather large as well. Caryota urens 30 feet tall Thai Black Giant was unaffected.

The same freeze did affect the following plants: 30% Leaf burn visible on exposed a. maxima fronds, mountain papayas defoliated, but no loss of growing wood. Ice Cream bean (25 feet tall tree) had some burn on top foliage. Light top burns on lucuma (15 feet tall). Some light damage on exposed fronds on New Zealand brush palm.

I would post the freeze temperature data, but apparently, the forum moderator won't allow me to post any images.

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Darold Petty

Welcome aboard, Axel !

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Brahea Axel

Hey Darold, long time no see. How's your parajubaea in San Francisco? The palm bug has bitten me again, I will be renewing my IPS membership, I'd love to have the Norcal IPS do a meeting at my place. A lot of my palms are pretty large now, so there's lots to see. Half of the garden is dedicated to palms, the other to fruit.

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Brahea Axel

I have a whole jungle of parajubaeas, it's the main focal palm in my garden. I was disappointed to find out that p. cocoides leaves are rather fragile and begin to show signs of burn around 28-29F once way up high off the ground.

My oldest p. cocoides grown from Oakland Palmetum seeds has 6 feet of trunk and the fronds have cleared all canopy. I never saw any damage on it from 28-29F until the crown moved high enough from the ground. I also have one of the oldest p. torallyi var. torallyi in California, planted from a 5 gallon pot in 1998. (Seed with pronounced razor blade-style ridges, like something out of a sci-fi movie.)

In January 2012, we had two days of freezing weather. The graphs from our garden's Wunderground station are shown below for both days. Day 1 had 2-3 hours below freezing, with a brief dip to 28.5F. Day 2 was not colder, still only down to 28.4F but the cold was for much longer: 9 hours below freezing, with 4-5 hours below 30F. Note that the station is in the lower garden, 6 feet off the ground, without any nearby trees or structures. it also runs 1.5F colder than actual temperature. So it wasn't quite this cold. Yet p. cocoides has 10% leaf burn. It's not visible from far away, but close up, you can see it. There is nothing hardy about p. cocoides. The fronds are about as hardy as my king palms, which actually showed less damage. The cold wasn't even enough to damage my mountain papayas, which defoliated, but there was no growing wood loss.

This same freeze didn't even touch my tropical guavas, cherimoyas, and all my avocados, (including Hass and Fuerte) sailed right through un-touched as well.

Other p. cocoides with 2 feet or less of trunk showed no damage, apparently radiation from the ground kept fronds warmer.

P. torallyi var torallyi, on the other hand was completely untouched, no sign of any damage, and it's rather large as well. Caryota urens 30 feet tall Thai Black Giant was unaffected.

The same freeze did affect the following plants: 30% Leaf burn visible on exposed a. maxima fronds, mountain papayas defoliated, but no loss of growing wood. Ice Cream bean (25 feet tall tree) had some burn on top foliage. Light top burns on lucuma (15 feet tall). Some light damage on exposed fronds on New Zealand brush palm.

I would post the freeze temperature data, but apparently, the forum moderator won't allow me to post any images.

I suspected the above mentioned damage could also have come from a multi-day heatwave at 108F the previous Fall, since not even archont. maxima got damaged last year. This year, I got confirmation, p. cocoides in lower garden witnessed 5 days of freezing temps with one day all the way down to 26.6F. Not a trace of damage on the tree. Not a single cocoides got damaged, only a p. sunkha seedling got damaged.

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Happypalm

Has anyone notice any increase in hardiness with age/maturity, like other parajubaeas?

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