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John in Andalucia

Eucalyptus deglupta in Europe

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John in Andalucia

An additional business venture for me, begins with the arrival tomorrow of 1kg (2.2lbs) of Eucalyptus deglupta seeds. I don't know how much of that weight will be chaff, but sources tell me that 1kg of seed is in the region of 2 million seeds. I have been looking online all year for this species, contacting most of the big nurseries that mentioned it by name, but all said the same thing, "We haven't had this one in for a while!". Eventually, a company called "AustraHort Pty." in Australia made some enquiries for me in July, and arranged a direct shipment from Papua New Guinea at the end of September. I then encountered DHL "Express" who asked me for information in dribs and drabs until the statutory 2-week phyto deadline for imports into Spain had expired. They didn't tell me this, and neither would they liaise with Spanish Customs, who only needed to know that my parcel had arrived in Spain within the 2-week deadline. Thanks DHL. So it was left to me to plead with Customs, who finally agreed that although everything was "not in order", they would release the merchandise. Then DHL asked me for my business tax code. I don't have one yet, so they asked for a copy of my passport, which was the very first piece of documentation I had sent them 2 months prior.

My initial concern is for the viability of Eucalyptus deglupta, but further reading, I discovered that the "short viability" of seeds, is relative to the 10 years or so, that a number of Eucalyptus species can endure if stored correctly.

Quote:

"At least two species of eucalypts, E. deglupta and E.

microtheca, have short viability under ambient conditions and must

be stored at low temperature (3-5°C) to maintain viability beyond

two years (Boland et al. 1980)."

I can't tell you how excited I am to be growing, alongside palms, one of the fastest growing trees on Earth, but how will a tropical Eucalyptus, native to an area 5 degrees either side of the equator fair in Europe? It is a vigorous grower, and it is not drought tolerant, but I'm sure many will be enthused to try.

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siafu
An additional business venture for me, begins with the arrival tomorrow of 1kg (2.2lbs) of Eucalyptus deglupta seeds. I don't know how much of that weight will be chaff, but sources tell me that 1kg of seed is in the region of 2 million seeds. I have been looking online all year for this species, contacting most of the big nurseries that mentioned it by name, but all said the same thing, "We haven't had this one in for a while!". Eventually, a company called "AustraHort Pty." in Australia made some enquiries for me in July, and arranged a direct shipment from Papua New Guinea at the end of September. I then encountered DHL "Express" who asked me for information in dribs and drabs until the statutory 2-week phyto deadline for imports into Spain had expired. They didn't tell me this, and neither would they liaise with Spanish Customs, who only needed to know that my parcel had arrived in Spain within the 2-week deadline. Thanks DHL. So it was left to me to plead with Customs, who finally agreed that although everything was "not in order", they would release the merchandise. Then DHL asked me for my business tax code. I don't have one yet, so they asked for a copy of my passport, which was the very first piece of documentation I had sent them 2 months prior.

My initial concern is for the viability of Eucalyptus deglupta, but further reading, I discovered that the "short viability" of seeds, is relative to the 10 years or so, that a number of Eucalyptus species can endure if stored correctly.

Quote:

"At least two species of eucalypts, E. deglupta and E.

microtheca, have short viability under ambient conditions and must

be stored at low temperature (3-5°C) to maintain viability beyond

two years (Boland et al. 1980)."

I can't tell you how excited I am to be growing, alongside palms, one of the fastest growing trees on Earth, but how will a tropical Eucalyptus, native to an area 5 degrees either side of the equator fair in Europe? It is a vigorous grower, and it is not drought tolerant, but I'm sure many will be enthused to try.

The seed is tiny, so 2 million seeds is probably right.

Watch out for damping off. The seedlings are tiny and very delicate.

I lost all my seedlings that way.

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fastfeat

John--

Seed lasts (nearly) forever, so you shouldn't have trouble raising at least a few hundred thousand.

I prefer using sterile mix and sowing sparingly to prevent damping off.

Though they grow well in areas of high rainfall, they will take drier conditions on clay to loam soils. They do very well in milder areas of Southern California (Santa Barbara through San Diego) with some supplemental irrigation. Take cold to about 28F/-2C.

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John in Andalucia

What I would like to know, is whether plentiful rainfall and less sunshine is more advantageous than a Mediterranean climate with irrigation (where temperatures are cooler, but never below freezing) and comparative growth rate.

I was smitten by the ornamental aspect of this tree, but it can grow up to six feet a year. It is the number one choice for reforestation in the tropics as a source of pulpwood, and as a mahogany hardwood, it is prized by the furniture and construction industry.

I found a great article for anyone else interested in growing this species from seed. It was written to help smallholders in the Philippines cultivating Eucalyptus deglupta. You can download the PDF file here: Propagating Eucalyptus Species

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LJG

John, you will not get 6 feet a year in a Mediterranean climate. I have been to gardens here in SoCal with trees that have been in ground for 25 years that are only 40 feet tall or so. I beleive the ones at the San Diego zoo have been then much longer and are nothing like you would see in FL. Another thing I have noticed is the color is never as nice one tree in a Mediterranean climates. All the ones here miss the 'rainbow' really. One long time grower of these told me his looked better when sun hit the trunk.

I like this tree and I am planting one out this spring.

What I would like to know, is whether plentiful rainfall and less sunshine is more advantageous than a Mediterranean climate with irrigation (where temperatures are cooler, but never below freezing) and comparative growth rate.

I was smitten by the ornamental aspect of this tree, but it can grow up to six feet a year. It is the number one choice for reforestation in the tropics as a source of pulpwood, and as a mahogany hardwood, it is prized by the furniture and construction industry.

I found a great article for anyone else interested in growing this species from seed. It was written to help smallholders in the Philippines cultivating Eucalyptus deglupta. You can download the PDF file here: Propagating Eucalyptus Species

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LJG

John, you will not get 6 feet a year in a Mediterranean climate. I have been to gardens here in SoCal with trees that have been in ground for 25 years that are only 40 feet tall or so. I beleive the ones at the San Diego zoo have been then much longer and are nothing like you would see in FL. Another thing I have noticed is the color is never as nice one tree in a Mediterranean climates. All the ones here miss the 'rainbow' really. One long time grower of these told me his looked better when sun hit the trunk.

I like this tree and I am planting one out this spring.

What I would like to know, is whether plentiful rainfall and less sunshine is more advantageous than a Mediterranean climate with irrigation (where temperatures are cooler, but never below freezing) and comparative growth rate.

I was smitten by the ornamental aspect of this tree, but it can grow up to six feet a year. It is the number one choice for reforestation in the tropics as a source of pulpwood, and as a mahogany hardwood, it is prized by the furniture and construction industry.

I found a great article for anyone else interested in growing this species from seed. It was written to help smallholders in the Philippines cultivating Eucalyptus deglupta. You can download the PDF file here: Propagating Eucalyptus Species

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fastfeat

From LJG: "Another thing I have noticed is the color is never as nice one tree in a Mediterranean climates. All the ones here miss the 'rainbow' really."

Len--

Although there aren't as many examples in SoCal to compare, I don't think the coloration is much different in SoCal versus SoFla. I think age of the tree (and, consequently, trunk size) has more to do with coloration. The Sports Arena trees and the big one in Montecito have trunks as colorful as any I've seen in SoFla of comparable size.

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John in Andalucia

With the amount of seed I have, I'm looking more into cultivating seedlings for export. I have a great opportunity to learn the best method for raising seedlings, and was aghast to see someone on eBay recently selling 25 seeds for 4-5 bucks! I just have the idea that with enough rainfall, they can be grown commercially for timber outside of the tropics, but I'm not sure where. Perhaps it wouldn't be viable without the high temperatures and humidity.

Further reading suggests that Madeira, the Azores and the Canary Islands would be ideal subtropical environments for Eucalyptus deglupta. Interesting snippet concerning Madeira:

"In the south, there is very little left of the indigenous laurisilva subtropical rainforest which once covered the whole island (the original settlers set fire to the island to clear the land for farming) and gave it the name it now bears (Madeira means "wood" in Portuguese). However, in the north, the valleys contain native trees of fine growth. These laurisilva forests, notably the forests on the northern slopes of Madeira Island, are designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO."

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fastfeat

John--

Not sure how valuable this species is as a timber tree; of course, "value" is a relative term. Most eucs are not considered high-quality wood in the US.

I'm sure others can add more valuable input.

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John in Andalucia
John--

Not sure how valuable this species is as a timber tree; of course, "value" is a relative term. Most eucs are not considered high-quality wood in the US.

I'm sure others can add more valuable input.

Ken,

By all accounts it is not a high-quality hardwood, since most plantation-grown "bagras" (E. deglupta) is used for pulp, but in the Philippines, it's one of five species being promoted in the wood-based industries. Here you can see a sample. Look for "BAGRAS - Southern Mahogany" (Link).

In the US and elsewhere, if you have any imported furniture or timber products from SE Asia, it may well include Eucalyptus deglupta wood.

As a focal point for eucalypts grown in Europe, I found this site useful: COLD HARDY SPECIES & CULTIVATION IN EUROPE.

Here's another worthy link to a site called "EarthSphere" aimed at promoting reforestation in the Philippines with the planting of Eucalyptus deglupta trees: (Link).

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fastfeat

John--

Interesting links. I'm surprised to see that E. deglupta wood density can approach that of teak (600kg/cu. m)!

Thanks.

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fastfeat
John--

Interesting links. I'm surprised to see that E. deglupta wood density can approach that of teak (600kg/cu. m)!

Thanks.

Also interesting that coconut is listed as a valued wood with the same density (600kg/cu. m)!!

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John in Andalucia

Today I contacted a company in Northern Spain where a lot of cold-hardy eucalypts are grown. Their website is packed full of photos and info. Click here. See the "Galería" page for some great shots. The guy running this consultancy has asked if I might like to be involved in trials of E. deglupta in "humid but mild Atlantic climates". Sounds interesting.

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fastfeat
Today I contacted a company in Northern Spain where a lot of cold-hardy eucalypts are grown. Their website is packed full of photos and info. Click here. See the "Galería" page for some great shots. The guy running this consultancy has asked if I might like to be involved in trials of E. deglupta in "humid but mild Atlantic climates". Sounds interesting.

Cool link. Looks like the euc guys really have it going on.

Thanks.

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John Case
John, you will not get 6 feet a year in a Mediterranean climate. I have been to gardens here in SoCal with trees that have been in ground for 25 years that are only 40 feet tall or so. I beleive the ones at the San Diego zoo have been then much longer and are nothing like you would see in FL. Another thing I have noticed is the color is never as nice one tree in a Mediterranean climates. All the ones here miss the 'rainbow' really. One long time grower of these told me his looked better when sun hit the trunk.

I like this tree and I am planting one out this spring.

What I would like to know, is whether plentiful rainfall and less sunshine is more advantageous than a Mediterranean climate with irrigation (where temperatures are cooler, but never below freezing) and comparative growth rate.

I was smitten by the ornamental aspect of this tree, but it can grow up to six feet a year. It is the number one choice for reforestation in the tropics as a source of pulpwood, and as a mahogany hardwood, it is prized by the furniture and construction industry.

I found a great article for anyone else interested in growing this species from seed. It was written to help smallholders in the Philippines cultivating Eucalyptus deglupta. You can download the PDF file here: Propagating Eucalyptus Species

Does this rainbow meet the standard?

post-646-1230698609_thumb.jpg

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LJG

Yeah, looks like what I have seen in SoCal. Blotchy, no long longitudinal runs of the same color and no bluish hues. Still a beautiful plant of course. Maybe it is just a size thing? When they get real thick, they peel differently?

John, you will not get 6 feet a year in a Mediterranean climate. I have been to gardens here in SoCal with trees that have been in ground for 25 years that are only 40 feet tall or so. I beleive the ones at the San Diego zoo have been then much longer and are nothing like you would see in FL. Another thing I have noticed is the color is never as nice one tree in a Mediterranean climates. All the ones here miss the 'rainbow' really. One long time grower of these told me his looked better when sun hit the trunk.

I like this tree and I am planting one out this spring.

What I would like to know, is whether plentiful rainfall and less sunshine is more advantageous than a Mediterranean climate with irrigation (where temperatures are cooler, but never below freezing) and comparative growth rate.

I was smitten by the ornamental aspect of this tree, but it can grow up to six feet a year. It is the number one choice for reforestation in the tropics as a source of pulpwood, and as a mahogany hardwood, it is prized by the furniture and construction industry.

I found a great article for anyone else interested in growing this species from seed. It was written to help smallholders in the Philippines cultivating Eucalyptus deglupta. You can download the PDF file here: Propagating Eucalyptus Species

Does this rainbow meet the standard?

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tropicalb

all i can say john is:

when they are plants under the 5 gal stage, keep them warm. i lost 30 or 40 of them to the '07 freeze. They do NOT like cold and are not frost tolerant at all.

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John in Andalucia

Burt - no frost here thankfully, occasional lows of 43-45F but generally around 48F low in winter.

John - thanks for sharing your photo. Who wouldn't be content with a specimen like that? Definitely something to aim for.

I heard back from the the consultancy guy here in Spain, Gustavo Iglesias. He gave me a wealth of information regarding the provenance of my seeds, and here's an extract from his email outlining the trials I mentioned earlier..

"I correspond with a group of plant nuts from the USA who are keen eucalypt growers. A bit like the palm people, but for eucs. Much lower numbers of growers than for palms, but still interesting.

Several of these are located in coastal areas of the West USA, from San Diego to Seattle.

A while ago we were arguing where the Northern limit for E. deglupta cultivation could be in the West coast of the USA. My bet is that for long term survival, it must be some blessed micro-climate somewhere between San Francisco in California and Brookings (Southern Oregon). More to the North (Oregon and Washington) is unsafe for “1 out of 10” winters, as it happened for Seattle. But still, I believe several would try it anyways. There are quite a good number of examples of cultivation in Southern California (Los Angeles to San Diego), but there climate is too dry for a fast growth. More to the North, humidity increases and if a proper place is found where frosts are not too much a worry…

A similar tendency could be found for the coastal Atlantic areas of the Iberian Peninsula. Roughly, from Aveiro (Portugal) to the North (Rías Baixas in Galicia) humidity near the coast is quite interesting for more than 10 months per year. And temperatures are favourable if in frost free areas. Some more friends around here could try to grow it if warned about some “international project”. USA vs. Europe for the Northernmost unprotected flowering E. deglupta in the world. In friendly terms, of course.

Several of these people have expressed their interest in growing them, if provided with seed to raise the plants or of seedlings. We happened to not have easy access to seed of this species, as it is normally not available. Your seed arrives as a blessing! I would not mind to publicise the “competition” through Eucalyptologics (we reach +5000 readers in +95 countries)."

I'm happy to oblige these guys! If it spurns a general interest in this most tropical of eucalypts, and if I master the germination technique, it could prove to be a valuable asset to my nursery business.

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fastfeat
John, you will not get 6 feet a year in a Mediterranean climate. I have been to gardens here in SoCal with trees that have been in ground for 25 years that are only 40 feet tall or so. I beleive the ones at the San Diego zoo have been then much longer and are nothing like you would see in FL. Another thing I have noticed is the color is never as nice one tree in a Mediterranean climates. All the ones here miss the 'rainbow' really. One long time grower of these told me his looked better when sun hit the trunk.

I like this tree and I am planting one out this spring.

What I would like to know, is whether plentiful rainfall and less sunshine is more advantageous than a Mediterranean climate with irrigation (where temperatures are cooler, but never below freezing) and comparative growth rate.

I was smitten by the ornamental aspect of this tree, but it can grow up to six feet a year. It is the number one choice for reforestation in the tropics as a source of pulpwood, and as a mahogany hardwood, it is prized by the furniture and construction industry.

I found a great article for anyone else interested in growing this species from seed. It was written to help smallholders in the Philippines cultivating Eucalyptus deglupta. You can download the PDF file here: Propagating Eucalyptus Species

Does this rainbow meet the standard?

John--

Is that tree growing in NorCal? If so, well done!

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SoulofthePlace

10 years later.... I am on Pico island, Azores and have grown several Eucalytus deglupta in pots (not in the ground yet). Planting them in the ground is aother matter due to lack of soil in my property (300 year old lava flows and no soil). Therefore it is very expensive to plant any trees here. I was unable to find the website in N. Spain who experiments with E. deglupta. I am planning on planting one of them into the ground, yet the fruit trees I planted in holes dug in the stoney ground usually end up without fruits or not growing.

Edited by SoulofthePlace

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SoulofthePlace

2021 update: I now have donated several rainbows to the local public gardens and planted 6 of them in my yard at around 150 m above sea level. They are now 2 to 3 m tall, some thicker, some thinner, some redder than others, some have their skirt down to the ground and some not. A couple were damaged by winds: the central and two branches were broken off, but they survive, since I don't get anything below +7C here at that altitude. No funny colors yet since they are still very young and not wide enough. The only colors so far are light brown and green, plus dark red on the branches and some leaves.

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