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RainForestt Robert

When Virtual & Real Worlds Collide

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MattyB

Thanks Bob, I'm really enjoying the tour!

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RainForestt Robert

Our group was fortunate to see two of Costa Rica's four native monkeys. The white faced monkey - Cebus capucinus - was the most accessible of the lot. Along the trail one came within a few feet of us and stayed for several minutes as if it was a political photo op.

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RainForestt Robert

This howler monkey was not as co-operative. He/she was not ready for a close up.

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RainForestt Robert

This does not fall into the category of wildlife, but I was amazed to find TEN TOES in the Arenal National Park. I know that there must of been hundreds there, but all were so well hidden. These just called out to me.

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RainForestt Robert

Speaking of pink, these Geonomas were among the nicest small palms that I saw in Costa Rica. Should go well with those understory Dypsis everyone wants to get their hands on.

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RainForestt Robert

This is one of the waterfalls in the Arenal National Park.

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RainForestt Robert

There are numerous locations in Costa Rica that could be used as sets for Major Motion Pictures. MattyB starring in the latest Indiana Jones movie. "Lights, camera, action" This set has the best name yet, the "Jumping Pit Viper Tunnel"

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RainForestt Robert

Juvenile Socrateas/Iriateas leaflets seem to be in almost one plane. As the palm matures the leaves take on a plumose appearance. I was lucky enough to find a leaf showing how the leaflets split to take on the plumose look.

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RainForestt Robert

Another palm photographed from above. I believe Prestoea decurrens.

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Kim

Really enjoying the extended coverage, Robert!

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Jeff Searle

Bob,

I'm really enjoying your excellent photos. I remember the day when Ryan told me later on how close the monkies came down to be photographed. I was further up the trail.

Jeff

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RainForestt Robert

If I was asked for a recommendation what to use for the trails, these bricks would be at the bottom of my list. Alternating hard and soft spots made the going pretty uncomfortable.

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However, views like this made me think "Shut up and keep walking."

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RainForestt Robert

This young Z. neurophyllidia was flushing a lone leaf.

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RainForestt Robert

This vine is called the Monkey Ladder Vine, I'm guessing that they are often seen clambering up this vine. The bridge just before we encountered this vine is named in it's honor.

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This vine is often cut and used for decorative purposes in the floriculture industry.

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RainForestt Robert

I really thought about the bridge precautions on the 45 meter high Arenal View Bridge. I negotiated it cautiously.

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Close to the end I made a U turn and was rewarded with this view.

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I just wish that the tree on the lower left was a stand of Socratea/Iriateas.

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RainForestt Robert

This gully was filled with palms. The young inflorescence was eyepopping. It looked like a firework explosion on July 4th.

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RainForestt Robert

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RainForestt Robert

This tree had more than its fair share of bromeliads. They appeared so symmetrical against the sky.

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RainForestt Robert

The following photographs may not be very clear, but I am including them to give an idea what happens when a Chamaedorea falls (or is pushed) to the ground. Aerial roots develop and the palm continues on its merry way, even producing inflorescences. The palm is the central structure in each of the following photos.

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RainForestt Robert

Inflorescences. I am not sure if they are both Geonomas. The second was startlingly red!

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RainForestt Robert

At the end of the trail there were some interesting gingers.

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putu enjula

Bob, I thought you were using my feet for scale! :lol:

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RainForestt Robert

Sure, Angela, Sure!

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RainForestt Robert

By the time I got back to the staging area I was ravenous. I proceeded to search for my boxed lunch, only to find out that the chicken was all gone, only roast beef remained. I am not a fan of roast beef. Apparently a few others are not also. Andre and I went to the restaurant at the observation deck and ordered lunch. It was a typical Costa Rican meal, pollo con arroz, chicken with rice. It was Delicious! Or maybe I was really, really hungry. The meal and soda cost less than $5.

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Andre did not eat his salad, being a bit wary. I ate mine. No problems mon!

While waiting for the meal I took a few photos of Arenal from the observation deck. As the clouds and their shadows moved every second you got a different perspective.

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I took a series of overlapping photos of the volcano and surroundings that I hope to photoshop into a panorama that will be one of my Costa Rica momentos.

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RainForestt Robert

Next to the bus was this potted Zamia neurophyllidia. I wonder if this was "wild collected" or from "cultivated" sources?

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This heliconia, Sexy Pink, was ready for its closeup.

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RainForestt Robert

On the way to Arenal we had staked out Cyrtostachys renda trees that appeared to be full of fruit. The viability of the seeds are very short. You can go from a high germination rate to zero if you wait 2-3 weeks after the seeds have been harvested. The intention was to ask the driver to stop at some church or location where we had seen some trees. Luckily we saw loaded trees at an apartment complex and asked the bus driver to stop for a "PHOTO OP". The manager of the complex came out and I immediately struck up a conversation. I mentioned that we were "The International Palm Society visiting Costa Rica and we stopped to admire his beautiful palm. Would you mind if we took some photographs and would you "sell" us some seeds?" The response was "That's fine, and just take the seeds". GAME ON! He was very helpful, even providing implements for us to cut down inflorescences. Truth be told I only got one inflorescence that way. I decided, why not climb the tree. So with Jeff Searle's help I decided to climb the tree.

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That's the apartment complex manager on the left. On the way up I started thinking that I was over 200 pounds. How strong are these Cyrtosatchys stems? Have they been tested for weight tolerance? If I fall from this height there is a good chance I could be paralyzed (Physical therapists think about these things). Those seeds would have to wait. However, Bill Olsen, who weighs about 100 pounds less than I do took up the challenge. Cyrtostachys stems can definitely tolerate his weight!

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In the end, no one was happier than Bill Olsen, Paul Richnow and myself. Here are the self congratulatory smiles (and the seeds) to prove it. The legend of Bus 4 - Cyrtostachys rolls on.

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putu enjula
By the time I got back to the staging area I was ravenous. I proceeded to search for my boxed lunch, only to find out that the chicken was all gone, only roast beef remained. I am not a fan of roast beef. Apparently a few others are not also. Andre and I went to the restaurant at the observation deck and ordered lunch. It was a typical Costa Rican meal, pollo con arroz, chicken with rice. It was Delicious! Or maybe I was really, really hungry. The meal and soda cost less than $5.

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:) I just have to comment on this picture because it brought back a good memory...

I was sooo hungry and all the chicken was gone... that was a problem because I don't eat red meat. I couldn't even eat the potato salad because it was contaminated with loads of bacon. :indifferent: I ended up giving my sandwich to one of the workers and then I ordered the same meal as Bob (thanks for the recommendation!) and it was DA BOMB!!! It was the BEST meal I had in Costa Rica!!! I have an aversion to apples so I gave my apple to the cook! ^_^

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RainForestt Robert

Angela the meal was great. My best meal in Costa Rica was on our first free night when Lefty, Andre, Bill Olsen, Linda and myself went to a swanky hotel downtown that Lefty recommended. The food and drink was the best.

On the way to Arenal Jim Glock, our resident bus 4 DJ, was spinning tunes on his ipod docking station. Different genres, big tunes all! Everyone who had a ipod had an option to play their tunes. After collecting our seeds the party was in full swing. Suddenly we heard a loud thud! A vehicle going in the opposite direction hit the driver's side mirror of our bus. The damage was not extensive, so the music and the beer continued to flow until there was another thud. This time it was a flat tire. Was there a cheer? We slowed and continued to motor along until we found an appropriate place to change the tire. It was in front a bar, small restaurant to the side, convenience store on the other side. Several locals hanging around. It was interactive as you wanted it to be.

Checking out the damage.

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Many lent a helping hand.

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Others decided to check out if the beer was cold.

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While Andre participated in a pick-up checkers game.

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RainForestt Robert

Taking in the scene

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RainForestt Robert

The old tire was stowed.

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BS Man About Palms ensured that the new tire was secured and then we gathered the stragglers and we were on our way.

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RainForestt Robert

We must of restocked the beer stash. Imperial seemed to be the cerveza of choice.

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Big tunes and beer could mean only one thing: Dancing in the aisle!

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RainForestt Robert

Jayanne, La Lady came from the back of the bus to show that she could throw down with the best of them. And she could ......

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The Queen of Bling was not outdone

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The party only subsided when the battery ran out on the docking station.

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Plans were made for the following day's activities. Talk of a talent show began. Mixed drinks to supplement the beer. There were smiles all around as a fantastic biennial day came to an end. OK, it really did not come to an end as many ended up in the hot tub, but I was tired and had an early night.

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putu enjula

Wow great coverage of the event!

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RainForestt Robert

Thanks Angela. I'm living it again. I wish others would post from their perspective.

The following morning the transformation of bus 4 from Chamaedorea to Chamaedorea/Cyrtostachys was complete.

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I think we can thank Paul "Let's Get Those Seeds" Richnow for the additional graphics, which highlighted four of the previous day's memorable events.

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Jeff Searle

Bob,

Great coverage with all your excellent pictures. Bus #4 definitely was a bus you didn't sleep on. I have already had request to be on the next "party bus' when in Brazil for 2010. But on a serious note.......it was great to be surrounded by movie stars, music entertainers, people with hidden talents and of course the paparazzi is never far off. :lol:

Jeff

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BS Man about Palms

TRUE DAT!

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RainForestt Robert

The drive from our hotel to the Poas Volcano was relatively short at 90 minutes, so we started off later than usual that morning. After the excitement and festivities of the previous day the later departure was appreciated. Everyone still seemed to be buzzing. The route to Poas Volcano, our first stop of the day was spectacular (as usual). There were a number of coffee plantations and many shadehouses growing plants for export.

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RainForestt Robert

Poas Visitor Centre. There were some expensive souvenirs here.

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RainForestt Robert

At this stage of the biennial I was taking fewer notes, so I don't have an id for this plant, which looked pretty prehistoric. It was not the first time that I saw plants here that seemed like appropriate fodder for dinosaurs.

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RainForestt Robert

Plants along the way.

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The air was a little rare at this altitude. I saw a couple of persons stopping to observe the wildlife. I know that they were just catching their breaths.

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