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H. belmoreana burning in SF?


Foggy Paul

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Hi all. We have a double H. belmoreana which we bought from Perry last year. It wasn't in pristine condition, but the price was right and we had the perfect spot for it, in morning shade and afternoon sun. Since then it has thrown three new leaves. All are showing signs of burning, or some other kind of damage. I've been fertilizing with Palmgain and I think it gets enough water. I was under the impression that this species can easily take full sun in coastal CA. And it rarely gets hot here--during this latest heat wave, when it's been well over 100°F inland, it hasn't gotten much over 70 here, in fact the fog is thick today with a high of 64. Here's the overall plant and the three new leaves. The third pic is the newest leaf, a few weeks old and already showing damage. What am I doing wrong? TIA for any suggestions.

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55 minutes ago, Foggy Paul said:

Hi all. We have a double H. belmoreana which we bought from Perry last year. It wasn't in pristine condition, but the price was right and we had the perfect spot for it, in morning shade and afternoon sun. Since then it has thrown three new leaves. All are showing signs of burning, or some other kind of damage. I've been fertilizing with Palmgain and I think it gets enough water. I was under the impression that this species can easily take full sun in coastal CA. And it rarely gets hot here--during this latest heat wave, when it's been well over 100°F inland, it hasn't gotten much over 70 here, in fact the fog is thick today with a high of 64. Here's the overall plant and the three new leaves. The third pic is the newest leaf, a few weeks old and already showing damage. What am I doing wrong? TIA for any suggestions.

 

Paul, I wouldn’t say “easily take full sun”. I’d say can acclimate to full sun. 
 

I have a H. Belmoreana that was purchased as a pretty good sized 15G and I live 1 mile from the ocean in Huntington Beach. It definitely burned when I planted it out and mine is facing North with protection from my house to the south and protected to the West from a Bismarckia. It gets overhead sun and some sun from the East…..it still took a few seasons to acclimate. It looks much better now. 
 

Yours actually looks like some of the leafs have cold damage/spotting instead of leaf burn. Is it possible it’s in too wet of an area? It’s not necessary to fertilize a lot either. At the most, PalmGain needs to be applied every couple months. I used to apply only 3 times a year with great results. 
 

-dale 

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In my limited experience , Belmoriana are not quite as hardy or forgiving as the Forsteriana . I think , mainly , because it is so slow growing so recovery or acclimation will also be slow. This one , unfortunately will take quite a while to start looking better. Harry

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Paul, I personally would have planted the palm in a morning sun, afternoon shade setting versus the reverse. Some H. belmoreana, even when well established, can sunburn in full afternoon sun even along the coast. Some eventually acclimate over time however. You’re in zone 10b so cold temperatures are not a problem nor are long cool periods for the palm. Cross your fingers and hope that your belmoreana is one of the ones that eventually acclimates to direct sun.  

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Jim in Los Altos, CA  SF Bay Area 37.34N- 122.13W- 190' above sea level

zone 10a/9b

sunset zone 16

300+ palms, 90+ species in the ground

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Belmoreana is more delicate than the Forsteriana .  They can take some morning sun for me, but afternoon sunlight is just too strong for them and many other plants.  The black areas on your leaves are not indicitive of sunburn so it might be a drainage issue. Sorry not to be of much help but maybe some of my experience will be useful.

Peachy

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I came. I saw. I purchased

 

 

27.35 south.

Warm subtropical, with occasional frosts.

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I wanted to show a picture but didn’t have a decent one. As stated earlier, facing North, protected from the back, slight protection from the West but after looking at it more today, it gets more sun than I thought in the late afternoon. Picture looking North. 

Been in the ground 3 1/2yrs from a large 15G  

-dale 

IMG_1629.thumb.jpeg.e88e47cd4fe6ce63a61f201f37abd6ff.jpeg

 

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Calling @Darold Petty whaddya you have to say, sir?

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One of my H. forsteriana suffered sunburn on the new, emerging frond during the July 4th heatwave. 

All of my H. belmoreana palms are sheltered by a canopy of  Trachycarpus wagnerianus and Cyathea medularis and showed no damage.

Paul, I think your palm has other issues besides excessive sun exposure.  My sun-burned frond is a uniform light brown color.  I would cover this palm with a shade cloth canopy, then consider moving it a few months later. 

 I agree with Billeb, stop fertilizing now,  and for the next few fronds. Some of these images for potassium ( K ) deficiency match your foliage.   K deficiency is the most common one, as it is water soluble and is leached out by irrigation.  I use greensand (glauconite), an organic, slow release source for K.  It is very safe, and cannot overdose.  Buy some, or come over and I will give you a quantity.  Again, stop the complete fertilizer and use only greensand.   :) 

https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/EP273

 

 

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San Francisco, California

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Thanks for all your comments. @Billeb, can you expand on your thought about it being in too wet of an area? It does get regular drip irrigation, and I augment that from time to time (it's right next to a C. plumosa which seems to need it). I can certainly put smaller emitters on the irrigation. @Jim in Los Altos, I agree that a morning sun location would have been better, but we didn't have one available. (PS I still want to arrange a visit to your garden! I'll PM you.) @Darold Petty, I don't fertilize it that often, maybe 3x/year, and it is surrounded by gravel "mulch" so the fertilizer perhaps doesn't get dissolved as it would in typical mulch. And drip irrigation doesn't dissolve it anyway, so that's another reason I hand water occasionally. Can greensand be made to work with drip irrigation? We could rig up a shade cloth too. I'll look into that. Our young Hedyscepe in the corner gets a bit of burn too, but not enough to take such steps.

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Paul, both of my exposed H belmoreana suffered some sunburn on emerging leaves during our late spring/early summer run of warm, dry days. The average UV index was quite high for a while there (relative to our norms for May/June). I planted them from 15g less than a year ago, and they're still settling in.

Nearby H forsteriana has been in the ground a couple years (also no trunk), gets lots of water, and only had the slightest browning of some terminal leaflet tips. This palm burned pretty badly its first year when I tried to acclimate it to the sun too quickly.

My Sphaeropteris cooperi was also burned during the same period when I allowed it to dry out, and this plant typically goes unscathed without a lot of attention.  

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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What I say may not be pertinent to H belmoreana grown in No Cal but I’ve had a belmoreana growing in my back yard jungle for nigh on 20 years (from a 1g to 3’ tall). My H forsteriana now has 5’ of clear trunk after it was planted 20 years ago.

I know both my Howeas hate my sweltering 6-7 month summers but glory in our dryer cooler winters. Knowing this I planted them under deep canopy in our jungle, esp the belmoreana so it gets little to no sun and the forsteriana as little as possible. Under deep canopy summer temps run 10-15 degrees cooler than ambient air. Somehow this juggling  act has made their survival possible these past 20 years.

In addition, both palms managed to survive Hurricanes Irma and Ian because of the canopy. The forsteriana lost most of its canopy to Ian and now gets more sun than I’d like but apparently it is large and robust enough to cope with the increased sun. The belmoreana lost little to no canopy but ended up with wind-burned leaflets from Ian’s cat 4/5 winds.

These two Howeas are dear to me but require special care here in SWFL and maybe in CA

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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47 minutes ago, Rivera said:

Paul, both of my exposed H belmoreana suffered some sunburn on emerging leaves during our late spring/early summer run of warm, dry days.

Yes, this is when the burn occurred on our new leaf as well. It was unusually warm for those couple of months. It's back to normal now (normal = socked in fog while the interior bakes). I agree with those who say the spotting is a different issue from the burning. I suppose that's the one I need to fix, and hope that the plant acclimates to what I still believe is very gentle afternoon sun.

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Paul, here is my sun burn damage on the tender, emerging frond of a healthy Howea. 

IMG_0676.JPG

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San Francisco, California

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34 minutes ago, Darold Petty said:

Paul, here is my sun burn damage on the tender, emerging frond of a healthy Howea.

Wow, I suppose I should be happy mine isn't worse! OK, I've placed an order for a small bag of greensand; I'll back off on the irrigation; and I'll consider a shade cloth canopy, if I can make it work in this space. Any other suggestions?

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20 hours ago, Darold Petty said:

One of my H. forsteriana suffered sunburn on the new, emerging frond during the July 4th heatwave. 

All of my H. belmoreana palms are sheltered by a canopy of  Trachycarpus wagnerianus and Cyathea medularis and showed no damage.

Paul, I think your palm has other issues besides excessive sun exposure.  My sun-burned frond is a uniform light brown color.  I would cover this palm with a shade cloth canopy, then consider moving it a few months later. 

 I agree with Billeb, stop fertilizing now,  and for the next few fronds. Some of these images for potassium ( K ) deficiency match your foliage.   K deficiency is the most common one, as it is water soluble and is leached out by irrigation.  I use greensand (glauconite), an organic, slow release source for K.  It is very safe, and cannot overdose.  Buy some, or come over and I will give you a quantity.  Again, stop the complete fertilizer and use only greensand.   :) 

https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/EP273

 

 

I'm curious what the reason for stopping the complete fertilizer is? I have a similar looking potassium deficiency on an Archontophoenix and was planning to supplement my normal fertilizer with glauconite, is that not a good idea?

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I believe that most palms receive excess fertilizer.  Fertilizer is not food, and is more like vitamins.  Eliminating a broad spectrum fertilizer removes one potential variable in Paul's problem.  :)

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San Francisco, California

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OK, the greensand is in. The soil didn’t seem excessively wet so I left the irrigation as is. The roots looked plentiful near the surface with a few growing slightly into the gravel mulch. Thanks everyone for your help and wish me luck 😃

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