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South Texas vs. South Florida


ahosey01

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Which is more humid generally?  I don't understand dew point vs. relative humidity.  Obviously they're both hot as f***.

I noticed that our temps lately have looked something like this...

Brownsville Wunderground stations (temp / dew point):

image.png.09e813430f6c87d06b432f7fffbeb7ca.png

image.png.cb234983ac1214019c2de295263003ef.png

Whereas in Florida (Miami-ish) you see:
image.png.bafd8f9a4dba5136d9d3f66dd59e5128.png

image.png.6397e554f7ec9300ef46cb9403607725.png

I don't really understand dew point vs. humidity.  Maybe someone smarter can explain to me.

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Dew point is the temperature the air would need to be to make the humidity level 100%.  The humidity percentage is the amount of water that air parcel has in it relative to that specific air temperature's capacity for water retention.  I'm sure someone here may have a better answer, but i always look at dew point for a measure of comfort over percent humidity.

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1 hour ago, flplantguy said:

Dew point is the temperature the air would need to be to make the humidity level 100%.  The humidity percentage is the amount of water that air parcel has in it relative to that specific air temperature's capacity for water retention.  I'm sure someone here may have a better answer, but i always look at dew point for a measure of comfort over percent humidity.

Only thing i'd add is  Dew Point would represent the temperature at which air becomes saturated.. moisture content in it produces dew..  Dew point of 65 / Air temp of 65 = fog / dew ..whatever..

 

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Here’s your spot vs mine.   Rough guestemite…  You are a little worse in the summer, but here the humidity doesn’t drop off as much in the off seasons, so it’s bit more constant throughout the year.   It’s definitely hotter in summer where you are.  It has only hit 100F here once, 80 years ago, and that’s the record.   Miami also recorded 100F one time, 82 years ago.  

FB810D5B-03FF-45A1-9E35-69868DA14031.thumb.jpeg.26d68268d9cf3493f37c0fedb4203d75.jpeg

FFF0E7A9-8AF2-4783-89C7-69FE5927A5A0.thumb.jpeg.2e91b81ee88a10646bcce9838fdc1311.jpeg

 

Other Comparisons.  

Wetter all year here….

6AF63EB1-9FA6-4E42-AAA3-01757E716E20.thumb.jpeg.680eaab823b2d9a168db7813e2f74ab5.jpeg

0F7396CE-206A-4BA1-9A28-19C8CBC0638F.thumb.jpeg.a0e819fe453bfbc0afca112aa7d69a74.jpeg


Hotter in daytime in summer in South Texas, but hotter all nights and warmer the rest of the year here…

60DD5903-40FA-438F-9545-42272F5389CD.thumb.jpeg.ae9977657574924a370c02860f37e22b.jpeg

 

85ECE867-D41A-4B20-87F8-F32996288C10.thumb.jpeg.a1f930c0c41ccfc21f8fb90ede5294e8.jpeg

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Dewpoint determines comfort, while relative humidity or percent full of moisture the air is it's current temperature determines drying factor. During dry cold such as in a desert it is possible to dry clothes outside at very low or even freezing temperatures if the humidity is very low, where in a tropical summer they may not dry even when it's very hot out without direct sunlight. 

 

^^ those graphs need a couple extra levels for some areas such as India, the coastal Gulf states (middle east), and the east africa tropical latitude humid desert. "Dangerous" dew point at 80+ and "Deadly" at 85+. Record dew points are around 90 F (32 C) but usually for very brief periods. 

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9 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Only thing i'd add is  Dew Point would represent the temperature at which air becomes saturated.. moisture content in it produces dew..  Dew point of 65 / Air temp of 65 = fog / dew ..whatever..

 

So this makes sense, but then I don't quite understand the connection to this:

5 hours ago, Aceraceae said:

Dewpoint determines comfort, while relative humidity or percent full of moisture the air is it's current temperature determines drying factor. During dry cold such as in a desert it is possible to dry clothes outside at very low or even freezing temperatures if the humidity is very low, where in a tropical summer they may not dry even when it's very hot out without direct sunlight. 

 

^^ those graphs need a couple extra levels for some areas such as India, the coastal Gulf states (middle east), and the east africa tropical latitude humid desert. "Dangerous" dew point at 80+ and "Deadly" at 85+. Record dew points are around 90 F (32 C) but usually for very brief periods. 

That means that the higher the air saturation temperature, the less comfortable you are?  I have noticed dew points around here regularly hit 80F.  I didn't know there was much significance to that though.

8 hours ago, Looking Glass said:

Here’s your spot vs mine.   Rough guestemite…  You are a little worse in the summer, but here the humidity doesn’t drop off as much in the off seasons, so it’s bit more constant throughout the year.   It’s definitely hotter in summer where you are.  It has only hit 100F here once, 80 years ago, and that’s the record.   Miami also recorded 100F one time, 82 years ago.  

 

Yeah and I think the stats you find online are generally for the Brownsville airport, which is a little closer to the coast and gets a little more of the ocean breeze..  I have a Davis weather station in my back yard and, this week for example, we have hit 102F-103F every day since last Thursday - at least where I'm at in town.

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6 hours ago, Aceraceae said:

 

 

^^ those graphs need a couple extra levels for some areas such as India, the coastal Gulf states (middle east), and the east africa tropical latitude humid desert. "Dangerous" dew point at 80+ and "Deadly" at 85+. Record dew points are around 90 F (32 C) but usually for very brief periods. 

I can only imagine what it would feel like in areas such as here. And unlike other areas of the middle east that record these high dew points occasionally then it's back to a dry heat, this area is always like this! With this region it's either "cooler" by the coast with higher dew points or very hot 10 or so miles inland with lower dewpoints. This is on the southern Red sea coast. Sea temps here also get over 34c/94f miles out to sea at 2m/6,6ft deep.

Screenshot2024-06-11104055.png.6a143f27eff56cce9d78fa327e0d4c5e.png

Jazan Saudi arabia

Screenshot2024-06-11123216.png.4fe03a7f134d3fdd092c0aa2d7e450ee.png

Al Zabyah a few miles inland from there.

Inland.thumb.png.0cc2228bdaa69cc9eb5fe9ecf8b0ac50.png

Still very sticky during the winter there.

Screenshot2024-06-11123618.png.994e92a5969176964eea4f3b71dcf4f5.png

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10 hours ago, Looking Glass said:

Here’s your spot vs mine.   Rough guestemite…  You are a little worse in the summer, but here the humidity doesn’t drop off as much in the off seasons, so it’s bit more constant throughout the year.   It’s definitely hotter in summer where you are.  It has only hit 100F here once, 80 years ago, and that’s the record.   Miami also recorded 100F one time, 82 years ago.  

 



 

Other Comparisons.  

Wetter all year here….

 

 


Hotter in daytime in summer in South Texas, but hotter all nights and warmer the rest of the year here…

 

 

I think it'd be more fair if you compared to immediate coastal Texas, Brownsville is like 30-35 miles inland 

Hot hot hot ...if anything I'm not sure how accurate this is, it should be even warmer. The wunderground stations on South Padre did not record a single overnight low BELOW 79F from July 9th, 2023 - August 22, 2023 with many nights in the 82-83F range. It did not drop below 76F from June 10th, 2023 - September 17, 2023. 

HumidityComfortLevelsinSouthPadreIsland(1).png.7588fe69f51b8791759ba90bea7cba07.pngAverageHighandLowTemperatureinSouthPadreIsland.png.4e74feeaea5d526b650f54cfdfefe453.png

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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2 minutes ago, Xenon said:

I think it'd be more fair if you compared to immediate coastal Texas, Brownsville is like 30-35 miles inland 

Hot hot hot ...if anything I'm not sure how accurate this is, it should be even warmer. The wunderground stations on South Padre did not record a single overnight low BELOW 79F from July 9th, 2023 - August 22, 2023 with many nights in the 82-83F range. It did not drop below 76F from June 10th, 2023 - September 17, 2023. 

Don’t know the specifics of South Texas…. Was just a comparison of where they are located to where I am located, since we are both in the general vicinity and on this thread.  I’m sure it varies quite a bit just like here…. Inland, costal, west coast, east coast etc.   Not sure what data range they used for the graphs... whether it was the average of the last 8 years or what?  

Looks like the data you posted follows the same trend, just exaggerated even more…  More humid in the on season, less humid in the off season, hotter in summer, colder in winter.  

Here, in SE FL closer to the ocean, we are moderated a lot.  The Gulf Stream makes it warmer in the winter,  while the Atlantic keeps us always below 100F in the summer.   I’ve lived in Massachusetts, New York, and Maryland, and all are hotter in the daytime in late summer than it ever gets here.  

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1 hour ago, Xenon said:

I think it'd be more fair if you compared to immediate coastal Texas, Brownsville is like 30-35 miles inland 

Hot hot hot ...if anything I'm not sure how accurate this is, it should be even warmer. The wunderground stations on South Padre did not record a single overnight low BELOW 79F from July 9th, 2023 - August 22, 2023 with many nights in the 82-83F range. It did not drop below 76F from June 10th, 2023 - September 17, 2023. 

HumidityComfortLevelsinSouthPadreIsland(1).png.7588fe69f51b8791759ba90bea7cba07.pngAverageHighandLowTemperatureinSouthPadreIsland.png.4e74feeaea5d526b650f54cfdfefe453.png

Where do you guys get these charts?  These are interesting...

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4 hours ago, ahosey01 said:

Where do you guys get these charts?  These are interesting...

Weather spark 

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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6 minutes ago, Xenon said:

Weather spark 

This is fun, I just compared Brownsville and Havasu, lol:

image.png.81e95d77ad7ed2d9d9062def9d609666.png

image.png.70d2f02cab0853aa5ef6ba902368e751.png

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Your about to go down a rabbit hole of almost useless knowledge lol. I love those and extreme weather watch for its records. It can make you very jealous of some locations too. 

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During the summer, I find it interesting to see the "feel like" temperature on Weather Underground. This is a combination of dew point and temperature. 

What is interesting is that you can compare regions of the desert Southwest with extremely high temperatures to high temperatures in Texas and Florida. What you find in Florida is that a temperature of 100°F many times yields a feel like temperature of 140°F when the dewpoint is applied. The same thing applies to the RGV in the most eastern areas. As you begin to pivot towards Laredo, Texas, you find that the lower dewpoints drop the feel like temperature to a value much closer to the actual temperature. 

It is interesting many times to see that the feel like temperature in the desert regions of the southwest during summer time can actually be
lower than the actual temperature because of the exceedingly low dew point. Bottom-line is that Brownsville is hot but many times Pahokee, Florida may feel hotter. This is true throughout humid Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida and other southern states during the summer.
 

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What you look for is what is looking

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