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Copernicia fallaensis


ahosey01

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Found a good deal on one of these.  I have heavy soil that is on the wetter side.  Any culture requirements anybody can share?

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Wetter is better and room to grow as these have a large crown, like baileyana.  I would guess a z10b palm.

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23 minutes ago, SeanK said:

Wetter is better and room to grow as these have a large crown, like baileyana.  I would guess a z10b palm.

I think that’s an overestimation cause we hit 22F-24F in that nasty 21 freeze and there are some here older than that for sure.  I have a hard time imagining a palm with that much mass around the apical meristem dying easily in all but the most protracted freezes.

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Mine is in sandy soil with a couple of drippers on it, not sure if they are 2gph or 1gph.  My soil pH is slightly acidic, and neither it or the same size Bailey have evr had any nutritional problems other than a bit of Magnesium deficiency after winter.  The Fallaensis took ~25F with frost and had minor leaf damage.  The Bailey took a little more burn but less than 50%.  I'd rate them a solid 9B but guess maybe not a cold 9A.  Neither took any significant damage from frosts in the upper 20s or 30s.

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These gotta be at least as hardy as royals, probably more. I was told nearly all (Cuban spp.) survived the 2021 freeze 

baileyana? fallaensis? sticking out above the green wall...tons more cool palms in there if you look closely. notice the dead Araucaria columnaris

coperniciabaileyana.thumb.JPG.386a2703dfd55e27930faee7b56d276c.JPG

 

this one looks to be C. hospita, damaged Bombax ceiba behind it 

coperniciahospita.thumb.JPG.b41ed71879f6c044107aba0c5bd39aee.JPG

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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Copernicia's are far more cold tolerant than one would expect. Some are extremely cold tolerant but the Copernicia fallaensis (incredibly beautiful) and Copernicia bailyana are able to tolerate temperatures in the mid-20'sF and survive. 

It is hard to believe that such a beautiful Cuban species is not more widespread, especially considering their cold tolerance. They do require heat (which you have plenty of in the RGV) but languish in coastal area's of California. They are slow growers even in south Florida but fortunately they are becoming far more prominent and larger. They were introduced in a major manner in south Florida by the Cuban culture first in Miami but they are spreading out across Florida. The Copernicia fallaensis is an absolute stunner and it's shivering variety of green is hypnotic!

A picture of a few mature Bailey's in the Keys:

38479B02-7208-44B1-A6C2-18794B54B96B.thumb.jpeg.7f3ff790fba9b1726b818306c04433ff.jpeg

 


 

 

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What you look for is what is looking

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12F109F7-C7AC-47A5-9EF4-D0CD2B2E7BF2.thumb.jpeg.4afaaa50389469faeabc4f50bbbb1bbd.jpeg

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What you look for is what is looking

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37 minutes ago, bubba said:

Copernicia's are far more cold tolerant than one would expect. Some are extremely cold tolerant but the Copernicia fallaensis (incredibly beautiful) and Copernicia bailyana are able to tolerate temperatures in the mid-20'sF and survive. 

It is hard to believe that such a beautiful Cuban species is not more widespread, especially considering their cold tolerance. They do require heat (which you have plenty of in the RGV) but languish in coastal area's of California. They are slow growers even in south Florida but fortunately they are becoming far more prominent and larger. They were introduced in a major manner in south Florida by the Cuban culture first in Miami but they are spreading out across Florida. The Copernicia fallaensis is an absolute stunner and it's shivering variety of green is hypnotic!

A picture of a few mature Bailey's in the Keys:

38479B02-7208-44B1-A6C2-18794B54B96B.thumb.jpeg.7f3ff790fba9b1726b818306c04433ff.jpeg

 


 

 

I'm hoping that in my soil and my heat they'll be at least a little less slow.

We'll see - lol

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Distribution and Ecology Called “yarey” (the vernacular for all Copernicia in Cuba) or “yarey macho,” which seems more descriptive and appropriate, C. fallaensis historically occurred in mesic, seasonally dry, semideciduous forest, savannas, and woodlands on heavy but fertile clay soils at low elevations (0-20 m) in the provinces of Camagüey, Ciego de Ávila, and Villa Clara in central Cuba

 

https://ucanr.edu/sites/HodelPalmsTrees/files/247344.pdf

 

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Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

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1 minute ago, sonoranfans said:

Distribution and Ecology Called “yarey” (the vernacular for all Copernicia in Cuba) or “yarey macho,” which seems more descriptive and appropriate, C. fallaensis historically occurred in mesic, seasonally dry, semideciduous forest, savannas, and woodlands on heavy but fertile clay soils at low elevations (0-20 m) in the provinces of Camagüey, Ciego de Ávila, and Villa Clara in central Cuba

 

https://ucanr.edu/sites/HodelPalmsTrees/files/247344.pdf

 

Well, this sounds almost exactly like where I live.  Sounds like I need to plant one.

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