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New Palm Trees Planted


richierich

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So I was visiting a plant nursery. I came upon these palms and they are currently planted in hot and dry conditions. All of these palms are 14 to 15 ft tall. They are planted 3 ft in moist soil. and currently watered twice daily. I have covered them with moist bags made of cotton to let them stay cool. However, I have no knowledge of how much water is required and I really want them to grow and successfully stay green. Any tips would be great. The nursery guy told me its called Copernicia something but I don't know the exact name of this tree.

 

Am I watering them too much? The conditions are really dry at around 42 C day time and 30 at night. They were planted 2 weeks ago. 3 ft deep and 2 to 3 ft diameter. Some of the palms have come out with fresh branches but some are yet to come out with new ones. I need tips please.

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pretty much hopeless no replies here.

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I was recently in the Punjab near Amritsar around three months back so I understand your conditions that you’re growing your palms hot and dry a good deep watering once a week should be fine or a drip irrigation system for twenty minutes every 3 days in your hot conditions in the cooler months reduce your watering keep an eye on the soil surface moisture letting the top inch dry out a bit place rock mulch around that will help with soil temperature and humidity along with moisture the small palm is a phoenix robellenii and the large could be Copernica your palms are dry tolerant ones so letting them dry out a little bit won’t hurt them palms grow slowly so a new leaf every couple of months or more they don’t grow like trees good luck and nameste or sat sri akal 

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On 6/6/2024 at 5:41 AM, richierich said:

So I was visiting a plant nursery. I came upon these palms and they are currently planted in hot and dry conditions. All of these palms are 14 to 15 ft tall. They are planted 3 ft in moist soil. and currently watered twice daily. I have covered them with moist bags made of cotton to let them stay cool. However, I have no knowledge of how much water is required and I really want them to grow and successfully stay green. Any tips would be great. The nursery guy told me its called Copernicia something but I don't know the exact name of this tree.

 

Am I watering them too much? The conditions are really dry at around 42 C day time and 30 at night. They were planted 2 weeks ago. 3 ft deep and 2 to 3 ft diameter. Some of the palms have come out with fresh branches but some are yet to come out with new ones. I need tips please.

IMG20240606141648.jpg

IMG20240606141652.jpg

This looks like a washingtonia.  If that is correct, these grow natively in even hotter and drier conditions near sources of water.  There is a massive grove of these off highway 95 in Parker, AZ, which gets to 50C most years and has been as hot as 54C.

I wouldn’t worry about the temperature as much as keeping the soil moist to a good depth.  They can take the heat.  They look great in those conditions.  Just keep the soil moist.  Do you have sand or clay or silt?

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@richierich the smaller Phoenix Roebellini looks a bit droopy.  They generally like water, so adding a bit more would be reasonable.  Make sure you are watering the existing root ball and not just next to it.  It'll take many months to grow significant roots out into the surrounding soil.  On a palm that size I would take a sharpie marker and mark horizontally across thee new spears and the adjacent old ones.  That way you can see at a glance how it is growing.  I'd expect less than 1cm per day on a new planting, amd it might be stationary for a while.

The big one could be Copernicia Alba, if it has huge vicious black thorns on the stems.  It's hard to say from the photo.  Copernicia are tough palms, but they are root sensitive.  Hopefully it was planted from a huge pot, and you didn't mess with the roots too much.

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49 minutes ago, Merlyn said:

@richierich the smaller Phoenix Roebellini looks a bit droopy.  They generally like water, so adding a bit more would be reasonable.  Make sure you are watering the existing root ball and not just next to it.  It'll take many months to grow significant roots out into the surrounding soil.  On a palm that size I would take a sharpie marker and mark horizontally across thee new spears and the adjacent old ones.  That way you can see at a glance how it is growing.  I'd expect less than 1cm per day on a new planting, amd it might be stationary for a while.

The big one could be Copernicia Alba, if it has huge vicious black thorns on the stems.  It's hard to say from the photo.  Copernicia are tough palms, but they are root sensitive.  Hopefully it was planted from a huge pot, and you didn't mess with the roots too much.

@Merlyn is correct about the copernicia ID.  I didn’t read that portion of the original post.

Everything I said is irrelevant - lol 

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The smaller palms are easily adjustable and tough ones. I have planted the bigger palms for the first time. And yes they are Copernicia palms. I was told by a local nursery guy to tie the branches of the leaves for some time and water once daily for June in the morning before sun rise. Because the temperatures reach very high at noon. 

 

@Merlyn The roots were packed in bags. We just removed the bags and then dug 3 ft deep and put them there. To be honest I am not very hopeful if these will survive. Maybe a few will but not all. I don't have any experience about how much water they need and have no idea about how frequently they need to be watered. Because the weather here is tricky It reaches to 45 C at noon and is usually 25 to 30 C at evenings and mornings. It also doesn't rain frequently in June or May in this part of the world. The rainy season starts in mid of July then it rains a lot.

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