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Trachy getting yellow-green fronds and folding in 7b.


LostForest

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I got a couple of young windmill palms, maybe about 3 years old, last year. They overwintered just fine, but now in spring, I'm noticing the leaves are more of a yellow green, and are getting a few brown spots here and there which don't seem to be leaf burn. 

I did realize that I forgot to fertilize them last fall so I assumed it was a nutrient deficiency. I gave them some Jobes palm food about 2 weeks ago. We had a crazy rainy March but the last month was pretty average rainfall for here on Long Island 

I'm not super concerned, but I did buy another one that's nice and healthy blue-green, so the difference is really stark right now.  Any ideas on the likely culprit? 

(Sorry for the rotated photos. My phone does that sometimes 🙄)

IMG_20240503_121907_HDR.jpg

IMG_20240503_122015_HDR.jpg

IMG_20240503_163708_HDR.jpg

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I don't see anything really wrong.  Please fertilize with osmocote plus outdoor or palmgain is what I recommend.  

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YouTube https://www.youtube.com/@tntropics - 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size, 3 dwarf),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), etonia (1) louisiana(5), palmetto (1), riverside (1),  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  18' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia odorata (1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -6F, -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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Trachys tend to yellow over winter.  They usually green up once the temps warm up.

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Agree, and a few comments: Nutrient absorption is slowed in cold soils. Younger trachys are more susceptible to winter stress. Some winter damage may only show up after a period of significant warm weather. I also wonder about your soil pH (possibly alkaline). 

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Zone 6b maritime climate

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Trachycarpus fortunei isn't reliably cold-hardy here in Tennessee except in Chattanooga, even though a few other parts of the state are marginally in USDA Zone 8a. Sabal palmetto actually lasted a bit longer in Memphis than T. fortunei did; Trachycarpus and other foreign palms just aren't adapted to the erratic winter temperatures that eastern and central North America tend to get. Sabal brazoriensis is probably your best bet for a tree-sized palm in areas that regularly reach single-digits degrees Fahrenheit, although Sabal 'Birmingham' and Sabal louisiana can also tolerate down to about five degrees Fahrenheit without substantial damage. S. brazoriensis basically looks like S. palmetto except that it's cold-hardy to about zero instead of ten and native to some suburbs of Houston instead of the coastal regions of the Old South, of Florida and around Mobile Bay.

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I'm just a neurodivergent Middle Tennessean guy that's obsessively interested in native plants (especially evergreen trees/shrubs) from spruces to palms.

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I feel like the fronds look greener and healthier in the photos than they do IRL haha. But I'll take everyone's word for it though, for now. I guess it could be a case where they didn't get the nutrients they needed prior to winter dormancy (like I said, I forgot to fertilize them last Fall) and they're just getting back into the swing of things.

If they get worse, or don't improve after the real warm weather hits in the next couple weeks, I guess I'll post with an update. They both have new fronds coming in, opening and everything, so I assume they're not DYING, I just got taken aback when I saw the stark difference compared to a "fresh" one I just bought, lol.

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When you bought your Trachies last summer/fall they had been watered, fed and gussied up by the nursery that wholesaled them. Not been to LI NY but I've read/seen enough info to know your winters can be brutal (I'm a native of Washington, DC and their winters sometimes go off the chart, too).

To expect a Trachy that is pristine in summer to go through a NE US winter and come out the following spring without cold damage and nutritional deficiencies is unreasonable. Time for rehabilitative care to get yours in peak condition for next winter's onslaught. Did/Do you plan to protect or supplementally heat your palms?

Welcome to PalmTalk. Keep us updated

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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Here is an example of 3 of my Trachys after their first winter in the ground.   This was back in 2019, by summer they were all greened up after some fertilizer and warm weather.  So yours really isn't all that bad.  I always had at least one or two that would get yellowish with all the cool weather, and winter rain.  This was the worst I had seen.

IMG_0857.thumb.JPEG.dbbef716f74351230a4742b7e14c8c1a.JPEGIMG_0855.thumb.JPEG.86dc0d79f6074930e7c1b651730bff46.JPEG

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On 5/4/2024 at 9:21 AM, Chester B said:

Here is an example of 3 of my Trachys after their first winter in the ground.   This was back in 2019, by summer they were all greened up after some fertilizer and warm weather.  So yours really isn't all that bad.  I always had at least one or two that would get yellowish with all the cool weather, and winter rain.  This was the worst I had seen.

IMG_0857.thumb.JPEG.dbbef716f74351230a4742b7e14c8c1a.JPEGIMG_0855.thumb.JPEG.86dc0d79f6074930e7c1b651730bff46.JPEG

Those petioles looked a little scary by how long their appearance is. Fronds  also scary,

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/3/2024 at 4:52 PM, LostForest said:

I got a couple of young windmill palms, maybe about 3 years old, last year. They overwintered just fine, but now in spring, I'm noticing the leaves are more of a yellow green, and are getting a few brown spots here and there which don't seem to be leaf burn. 

I did realize that I forgot to fertilize them last fall so I assumed it was a nutrient deficiency. I gave them some Jobes palm food about 2 weeks ago. We had a crazy rainy March but the last month was pretty average rainfall for here on Long Island 

I'm not super concerned, but I did buy another one that's nice and healthy blue-green, so the difference is really stark right now.  Any ideas on the likely culprit? 

(Sorry for the rotated photos. My phone does that sometimes 🙄)

IMG_20240503_121907_HDR.jpg

IMG_20240503_122015_HDR.jpg

IMG_20240503_163708_HDR.jpg

How are these palms doing?

Zone 6b maritime climate

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On 5/6/2024 at 10:33 AM, ChicagoPalma said:

Those petioles looked a little scary by how long their appearance is. Fronds  also scary,

These were shade grown and neglected, but the price was right.  I had ones in the back with over 6 foot petioles, they looked great.   I prefer shade grown Trachys to ones in full sun any day.  These ones after a few years of TLC are all green and have very short petioles.   Video from a couple of years back.

 

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2 hours ago, Chester B said:

These were shade grown and neglected, but the price was right.  I had ones in the back with over 6 foot petioles, they looked great.   I prefer shade grown Trachys to ones in full sun any day.  These ones after a few years of TLC are all green and have very short petioles.   Video from a couple of years back.

 

Long petioles are fine as long as they are not over-streched.

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