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Why not grow orchids?


Matt in SD

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On 1/10/2023 at 12:36 AM, Tracy said:

The downside to Laelia's blooming in December and January is that they often get the brunt of our most cold and wet part of the year.  Laelia anceps var veitchiana has seen a fair amount of rain and wind, fortunately the temps have been more moderated with the storms that have come through thus far.

I have never discovered why they often change their flowering period, sometimes they can start in November, sometimes the buds will open in March (obviosly stopping during the coldest month).

I like instead those species or hybrids that will prepare their spikes in Autumn and wait until Spring to go ahead. An example is Cattleya percivaliana, it should flower in Winter, but mine is so wise that it will wait until Spring

IMG_4081.JPG

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13 minutes ago, Tomas said:

I have never discovered why they often change their flowering period, sometimes they can start in November, sometimes the buds will open in March (obviosly stopping during the coldest month).

I like instead those species or hybrids that will prepare their spikes in Autumn and wait until Spring to go ahead. An example is Cattleya percivaliana, it should flower in Winter, but mine is so wise that it will wait until Spring

IMG_4081.JPG

🤔 I can see different forms flowering a little earlier or later, but still within the overall flowering period for the species.., but C. perciveliana flowering months outside  it's usual time frame? ( March / April, vs. late Nov. to Jan. )  ..something isn't adding up..

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"🤔 I can see different forms flowering a little earlier or later, but still within the overall flowering period for the species.., but C. perciveliana flowering months outside  it's usual time frame? ( March / April, vs. late Nov. to Jan. )  ..something isn't adding up.."

It  is much colder here than in its habitat, I think it could be this.  This December was very warm here in Italy and C. percivaliana is already in bud

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30 minutes ago, Tomas said:

"🤔 I can see different forms flowering a little earlier or later, but still within the overall flowering period for the species.., but C. perciveliana flowering months outside  it's usual time frame? ( March / April, vs. late Nov. to Jan. )  ..something isn't adding up.."

It  is much colder here than in its habitat, I think it could be this.  This December was very warm here in Italy and C. percivaliana is already in bud

Possible, but wouldn't consider betting on it.. It is considered a cool-ish, but adaptable lithophytic grower.. Even in CA, where it is cooler than habitat, or in S. FL,  these flower from late Nov., December, and in Jan.

..In habitat, they can flower from Late summer- December..  Never in spring,  ..or is what has been observed.   Anythings possible, but I'd be pretty surprised to see a legit specimen ( confirmed via DNA testing ) consistently flower that far outside it's natural flowering cycle, or what has been documented repeatedly by expert long time growers in the northern hemisphere.

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Cattleya dowiana - clues on mature growth?


Hi all. My first year growing this species and I don’t want to kill it.  I know it requires a dry warm season after growth matures and I don’t want to get the culture wrong by watering when I should not be. Does this growth look mature and ready for the rest season? Should I wait until the papery sheath dries up? Trying to verify the clues to look for.

I don’t think it will bloom this season with no bud sheath. It did, however, grow indoors 3 or 4x larger than the previous growth with good flush of roots so I think my indoor lights were really effective thus far. Providing it with a warm to hot winter rest period will be a challenge in a Rhode Island winter especially with electric rates up 40% this year 😳 I do have heating mats and the lights add heat as well.

62402745-5925-4BBA-A76F-9C89970F2F32.thumb.jpeg.5c57b8768d0ffbcff9133200da6c44b4.jpeg

04E39779-83CA-49BE-BB60-92AFAFCDD703.thumb.jpeg.c6ceac324b95bd1631a5bf81358ada89.jpeg

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18 hours ago, John hovancsek said:

Some beautiful orchids in bloom 

Those are some beauties John.

I'll throw in this little cool growing Maxillaria scalariformis, which I selected because of the dark green foliage.  The little flowers are an added bonus.  It wasn't in bloom when I acquired it and was hoping for one of the darker pink forms, but this white with pink highlights is nice too.

20230111-BH3I9999.jpg

20230111-BH3I0001.jpg

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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On 1/11/2023 at 8:42 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

Possible, but wouldn't consider betting on it.. It is considered a cool-ish, but adaptable lithophytic grower.. Even in CA, where it is cooler than habitat, or in S. FL,  these flower from late Nov., December, and in Jan.

Rome Italy is 42°N lat., something like the northern border of California, it is much colder in winter here, some autumn/winter flowering orchids will abort the buds, like Cattleya bowringiana. Anyway, the percivaliana is in bud this winter, as it is a quite mild one so far. If next year with a more normal winter it will return to its spring flowering pattern, that would be a confirmation of the delay by the cold.

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On 1/11/2023 at 10:04 PM, piping plovers said:

Cattleya dowiana - clues on mature growth?


Hi all. My first year growing this species and I don’t want to kill it.  I know it requires a dry warm season after growth matures and I don’t want to get the culture wrong by watering when I should not be. Does this growth look mature and ready for the rest season? Should I wait until the papery sheath dries up? Trying to verify the clues to look for.

I don’t think it will bloom this season with no bud sheath. It did, however, grow indoors 3 or 4x larger than the previous growth with good flush of roots so I think my indoor lights were really effective thus far. Providing it with a warm to hot winter rest period will be a challenge in a Rhode Island winter especially with electric rates up 40% this year 😳 I do have heating mats and the lights add heat as well.

62402745-5925-4BBA-A76F-9C89970F2F32.thumb.jpeg.5c57b8768d0ffbcff9133200da6c44b4.jpeg

04E39779-83CA-49BE-BB60-92AFAFCDD703.thumb.jpeg.c6ceac324b95bd1631a5bf81358ada89.jpeg

Unfortunatele the only thing I can say, it is considered to be a difficult one, especialy the var. auera, so a lot of patience is needed 🙂

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I have this "volunteer" growing in with my Dendrobium gracilicauale ssp howeanunm.  I know I have been told what the name of it is before and that they are very prolific, liking to spread from one container to the next.  I just don't recall what the name of it is.  I was just moving the Dendrobium to a brighter spot to encourage it to put out some buds before it's too late and I miss the spring bloom.  That was when I noticed it in this pot..

20230113-BH3I0012.jpg

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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On 1/14/2023 at 12:03 AM, miamicuse said:

Went to the Tamiami international Orchid Festival yesterday.  Some pictures to share

Fantastic photos,  thanks for sharing!

what type is this really large orchid you posted? A real show stopper specimen.

134A0F6B-D2AB-4437-BD37-C073A5C88FEB.jpeg.7c30f78710be6712cb6d1bb3be3f3eaa.jpeg

 

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2 hours ago, piping plovers said:

Fantastic photos,  thanks for sharing!

what type is this really large orchid you posted? A real show stopper specimen.

134A0F6B-D2AB-4437-BD37-C073A5C88FEB.jpeg.7c30f78710be6712cb6d1bb3be3f3eaa.jpeg

 

Possibly Coelogyne rochussenii,  ...or a cross involving it

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2 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Coelogyne rochussenii,  ...or a cross involving it

Ah, intriguing.  I need to find out more about this species, even if it’s just a parent.  Thanks Silas 😁 
 

yup, i just looked it up. Foliage reminds me of stanhopea; looks attractive even when not blooming.  Those flowers individually give me a cymbidium vibe.  And known to be fragrant… sounds like a real winner 👍

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7 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Ah, intriguing.  I need to find out more about this species, even if it’s just a parent.  Thanks Silas 😁

They are super fragrant and i think every orchid collector needs at least one. 

7377148F-E559-4138-89B5-8BCE79436F94.jpeg

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21 hours ago, Tracy said:

I have this "volunteer" growing in with my Dendrobium gracilicauale ssp howeanunm.  I know I have been told what the name of it is before and that they are very prolific, liking to spread from one container to the next.  I just don't recall what the name of it is.  I was just moving the Dendrobium to a brighter spot to encourage it to put out some buds before it's too late and I miss the spring bloom.  That was when I noticed it in this pot..

20230113-BH3I0012.jpg

Not sure of the name but they have a thick root that is hard to get, if you don’t get the root the plant will come back 

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1 minute ago, John hovancsek said:

They are super fragrant and i think every orchid collector needs at least one

Oh nice John.  Beautifully presented——Fantastic, fantastic! Thank you.  Yes, I’m going to look for one of these.

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30 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Ah, intriguing.  I need to find out more about this species, even if it’s just a parent.  Thanks Silas 😁 
 

yup, i just looked it up. Foliage reminds me of stanhopea; looks attractive even when not blooming.  Those flowers individually give me a cymbidium vibe.  And known to be fragrant… sounds like a real winner 👍

Am. Orchid Soc. information listing it as an intermediate to warm grower, if that matters..  There are also numerous, outstanding ..and larger-flowered sp / selected forms/ hybrids ( a few )... that will tolerate cooler conditions.  https://www.aos.org/orchids/additional-resources/coelogyne-culture.aspx

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55 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Am. Orchid Soc. information listing it as an intermediate to warm grower, if that matters..  There are also numerous, outstanding ..and larger-flowered sp / selected forms/ hybrids ( a few )... that will tolerate cooler conditions.  https://www.aos.org/orchids/additional-resources/coelogyne-culture.aspx

I am growing one that is a "cool grower" but have not been successful in finding the right spot in the garden to get it to rebloom.  Picture below was my last blooms on it in February 2018.  I still have hopes that I'll get to bloom again.  Coelogyne cristata v grandiflora

20180208-104A8548.jpg

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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4 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Possibly Coelogyne rochussenii,  ...or a cross involving it

Nathan is correct. 👍

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6 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Am. Orchid Soc. information listing it as an intermediate to warm grower, if that matters..  There are also numerous, outstanding ..and larger-flowered sp / selected forms/ hybrids ( a few )... that will tolerate cooler conditions.  https://www.aos.org/orchids/additional-resources/coelogyne-culture.aspx

Really enjoyed that article.  Thank you.  I believe my neighbor used to grow the C. cristata for decades while living in Germany.  After reading this article I can see why it was so tolerant of the cold and dark winters growing indoors in Germany.  I would like to try both the Borneo species mentioned above and the cooler growing cristata.

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17 hours ago, Tracy said:

I am growing one that is a "cool grower" but have not been successful in finding the right spot in the garden to get it to rebloom.  Picture below was my last blooms on it in February 2018.  I still have hopes that I'll get to bloom again.  Coelogyne cristata v grandiflora

20180208-104A8548.jpg

It should be easy for you, it surely likes your lower minimum temperatures in summer. I used to grow one and it was flowering easily, lost it in the 2018 freeze here in Rome. It is better shaded in summer and as much sun as possible and dry in winter. Here is its swan song right after the freeze, then it started to decline

IMG_8686.JPG

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Why not grow orchids?

I actualy do not grow orchids in my garden. The problem is not the cold, it is not the watering, it is the slugs and snails. If growing orchids there, it would be like serving them the delicious delicacy of fresh root tips and flower buds.

I grow orchids on my terrace in Rome, where the battle has more chances to be won. It is tens of years the war is on (I remember when I introduced the rechargeable batteries for my electric torch - no LED lights in sight then) and I mostly won, but like the Nazi Werwolf the snails are still here. I offer them the best I can, beer, patatoes, fresh salad to lure them out of their hiding places, but it is sure, the last one will be still there to munch on the bud ready to open.

I will appreciate any story about your experiences with these hateful pests.

d75790db-bf89-4f5e-bf2e-74a3956c2cf1.jpg

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1 hour ago, Tomas said:

It should be easy for you, it surely likes your lower minimum temperatures in summer. I used to grow one and it was flowering easily, lost it in the 2018 freeze here in Rome. It is better shaded in summer and as much sun as possible and dry in winter. Here is its swan song right after the freeze, then it started to decline

IMG_8686.JPG

Agree, providing a defined " dry winter rest" might be a factor..  Seems to be laid out repeatedly in every article i've been able to read regarding many of the Coelogyne.  some cool- growing Dendrobiums can refuse to flower / produce fewer flowers unless kept almost bone dry while dormant / not actively growing also.  Wasn't until i put a D. aggregatum ( Syn. lindleyi ) i had for several years under a patio, where it stayed dry from November- the beginning of Feb. that it started finally flowering. D. nobile ...and superbum / anosmum responded to the same dormant season treatment as well. 

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7 hours ago, Tomas said:

Why not grow orchids?

I actualy do not grow orchids in my garden. The problem is not the cold, it is not the watering, it is the slugs and snails. If growing orchids there, it would be like serving them the delicious delicacy of fresh root tips and flower buds.

I grow orchids on my terrace in Rome, where the battle has more chances to be won. It is tens of years the war is on (I remember when I introduced the rechargeable batteries for my electric torch - no LED lights in sight then) and I mostly won, but like the Nazi Werwolf the snails are still here. I offer them the best I can, beer, patatoes, fresh salad to lure them out of their hiding places, but it is sure, the last one will be still there to munch on the bud ready to open.

I will appreciate any story about your experiences with these hateful pests.

d75790db-bf89-4f5e-bf2e-74a3956c2cf1.jpg

Not sure what the nurseries / home growers in California that grow many of their Orchids outdoors do to deter them,  but Snails / Slugs are very common annoyances there, esp. imported Brown Garden and Decollate Snails ( which actually prey on Brown Snails / Slugs )..

Regardless, though i'm sure it happens.. don't think they're too big of an issue for people and nurseries that grow their orchids outdoors out there.  Can't recall them getting to any of the orchids i had which i kept outside ..or any of the ones my grandparents grew on their patio.  Would find the occasional munched flowers / buds, Snails hiding in or under the rims of potted Cymbidium and Epidendrums  they kept on benches placed in other areas of their yard though.  


What you could look into to keep them from getting to your plants, aside from what you're already doing..   If available there, get some Copper Tape and put a strip around the outside of pots so any tempted snails / slugs are killed when they cross that barrier, ...That and / or wrap some around the wires on specimens you might grow in hanging baskets ..so they can't use the wires to access the plants.

If slugs are making homes in the growing media itself?, that might be tougher to get control of,  though i'm sure there is a way to repel them,  that won't hurt the plants.

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On 1/17/2023 at 1:58 AM, Silas_Sancona said:

Not sure what the nurseries / home growers in California that grow many of their Orchids outdoors do to deter them,  but Snails / Slugs are very common annoyances there, esp. imported Brown Garden and Decollate Snails ( which actually prey on Brown Snails / Slugs )..

Regardless, though i'm sure it happens.. don't think they're too big of an issue for people and nurseries that grow their orchids outdoors out there.  Can't recall them getting to any of the orchids i had which i kept outside ..or any of the ones my grandparents grew on their patio.  Would find the occasional munched flowers / buds, Snails hiding in or under the rims of potted Cymbidium and Epidendrums  they kept on benches placed in other areas of their yard though.  


What you could look into to keep them from getting to your plants, aside from what you're already doing..   If available there, get some Copper Tape and put a strip around the outside of pots so any tempted snails / slugs are killed when they cross that barrier, ...That and / or wrap some around the wires on specimens you might grow in hanging baskets ..so they can't use the wires to access the plants.

If slugs are making homes in the growing media itself?, that might be tougher to get control of,  though i'm sure there is a way to repel them,  that won't hurt the plants.

In my garden, the slugs and snails are simply too much, on a cymbidium there will be no single flower left ... 

Is the copper tape something specifical manufactured for the defence from the snails? I do not thing it will work, beside this https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/sep/27/eggshell-and-copper-tape-do-not-protect-veg-from-slugs-and-snails I have some anecdotal experiences to tell. I have a Laelia jongheana growing on a piece of cork oak branch and it is suspended on 6'' of electric copper wire, the slugs still get to the plant, maybe the wire is oxidiezed and not efficient. As to the sharp surfaces that may prevent slugs from crawling, I have found some slime on the points of the thorns of an echinocactus grussonii LOL

On the positive side, there are some orchids slugs and snails leave in peace, Dendrobium kingianum and Epidendrum radicans being some of them.

If you suspect the snails are in the growing media in the pot, I have found an easy solution that works 100%. I use this when bringing orchids inside to have them flowering in my living room. If you submerge the entire pot in a bucket with some water (some weight may be needed to prevent it from floating), in less than ten minutes all the slugs and snails will be outside the water and somewhere visible on the orchid. Then it is possible to sleep in peace 🙂

To learn something about these pests, here is a photo of a tray with some dried rests of Vim Clorex, a detergent I use to rub my pots with, as the name suggests, there is some some chlorine in it, and also a lot of fine grinded pumice. You can see, the slug really enjoyed it. 

vc.jpg

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7 hours ago, Tomas said:

In my garden, the slugs and snails are simply too much, on a cymbidium there will be no single flower left ... 

Is the copper tape something specifical manufactured for the defence from the snails? I do not thing it will work, beside this https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/sep/27/eggshell-and-copper-tape-do-not-protect-veg-from-slugs-and-snails I have some anecdotal experiences to tell. I have a Laelia jongheana growing on a piece of cork oak branch and it is suspended on 6'' of electric copper wire, the slugs still get to the plant, maybe the wire is oxidiezed and not efficient. As to the sharp surfaces that may prevent slugs from crawling, I have found some slime on the points of the thorns of an echinocactus grussonii LOL

On the positive side, there are some orchids slugs and snails leave in peace, Dendrobium kingianum and Epidendrum radicans being some of them.

If you suspect the snails are in the growing media in the pot, I have found an easy solution that works 100%. I use this when bringing orchids inside to have them flowering in my living room. If you submerge the entire pot in a bucket with some water (some weight may be needed to prevent it from floating), in less than ten minutes all the slugs and snails will be outside the water and somewhere visible on the orchid. Then it is possible to sleep in peace 🙂

To learn something about these pests, here is a photo of a tray with some dried rests of Vim Clorex, a detergent I use to rub my pots with, as the name suggests, there is some some chlorine in it, and also a lot of fine grinded pumice. You can see, the slug really enjoyed it. 

vc.jpg

Saw that article and some videos as well regarding the effectiveness ...or lack of...  using copper tape. Seemed to deter some types of Snails, but not others..  

There's a DIY ( Do It Yourself ) Project some people demonstrated using a 9 volt battery attached to Copper tape / wires ..or Galvanized wire that seemed to deter snails /slugs ( Gives them enough of a shock when they try to cross the wires )

Seems Diatomaceous Earth could be effective since the Silica in it is sharp enough to cut the skin of the critters, causing them to dehydrate ..kind of like Salt can. 

Dunking pots to force out any slugs hiding in the planting media makes sense for sure..

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On 1/18/2023 at 6:43 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

Saw that article and some videos as well regarding the effectiveness ...or lack of...  using copper tape. Seemed to deter some types of Snails, but not others..  

There's a DIY ( Do It Yourself ) Project some people demonstrated using a 9 volt battery attached to Copper tape / wires ..or Galvanized wire that seemed to deter snails /slugs ( Gives them enough of a shock when they try to cross the wires )

Seems Diatomaceous Earth could be effective since the Silica in it is sharp enough to cut the skin of the critters, causing them to dehydrate ..kind of like Salt can. 

Dunking pots to force out any slugs hiding in the planting media makes sense for sure..

Sharp enough - their slime probably alow them to move on any surface without touching it, their dilemma I think is "is the premium worth wasting it?"

I can believe the electrical shock of a 9V battery is not to their liking, but will copper alone generate enough electrical charge?

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6 hours ago, Tomas said:

Sharp enough - their slime probably alow them to move on any surface without touching it, their dilemma I think is "is the premium worth wasting it?"

I can believe the electrical shock of a 9V battery is not to their liking, but will copper alone generate enough electrical charge?

There's at least one video i'd found that showed what happens when slugs tried to cross a ring of D.E.  Some touched it and were repelled ( then died, lol ). Others crossed, but quickly flopped over / started dying.

In the case of a cactus spine, the surface of the spine is smooth enough that they can usually maneuver around the tip without getting jabbed.  Silica pieces in D.E. are much sharper.

As far as using a 9 volt, in the videos i'd looked at, you'd use two strips of copper tape ..wire, or galvanized steel wire, connecting just one of the wires to each strip of tape / wire w/ the use of a soldering gun.. They get zapped when they touch both as they try to cross.

Not sure how you would do something like that for individual hanging pots though.. Though i'm sure it is possible to.

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On 1/20/2023 at 6:45 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

There's at least one video i'd found that showed what happens when slugs tried to cross a ring of D.E.  Some touched it and were repelled ( then died, lol ). Others crossed, but quickly flopped over / started dying.

In the case of a cactus spine, the surface of the spine is smooth enough that they can usually maneuver around the tip without getting jabbed.  Silica pieces in D.E. are much sharper.

As far as using a 9 volt, in the videos i'd looked at, you'd use two strips of copper tape ..wire, or galvanized steel wire, connecting just one of the wires to each strip of tape / wire w/ the use of a soldering gun.. They get zapped when they touch both as they try to cross.

Not sure how you would do something like that for individual hanging pots though.. Though i'm sure it is possible to.

Thank you very much for taking all the time to try to help me, I really enjoy discussing with people that know what they are saying. 

I have looked at some of the "slug" videos and really it seems all can happen on youtube or facebook, there were slugs stopping in front of the copper wire and many other things, but also those that overcome that with ease. At the end I finished with this video 

I actualy know his Garden myths Internet pages since many years, something that really suites my skeptical mind. And he also nails the most important DE deffect, it must remain dry to work, a condition nearly impossible to fulfill in a garden, especially in the mediterranean climate where the snails will hybernate in summer and attack with the wet season.

There is only one thing I disagree with, he says if you leave enough other plants and weeds they will eat these, but in my experience the absolutely most prefered plants for slugs are orchids and all the plants I covet most

At least I have learned the copper wire and the 9V battery method, I will surely use it when placing orchids on some plants

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2 hours ago, Tomas said:

Thank you very much for taking all the time to try to help me, I really enjoy discussing with people that know what they are saying. 

I have looked at some of the "slug" videos and really it seems all can happen on youtube or facebook, there were slugs stopping in front of the copper wire and many other things, but also those that overcome that with ease. At the end I finished with this video 

I actualy know his Garden myths Internet pages since many years, something that really suites my skeptical mind. And he also nails the most important DE deffect, it must remain dry to work, a condition nearly impossible to fulfill in a garden, especially in the mediterranean climate where the snails will hybernate in summer and attack with the wet season.

There is only one thing I disagree with, he says if you leave enough other plants and weeds they will eat these, but in my experience the absolutely most prefered plants for slugs are orchids and all the plants I covet most

At least I have learned the copper wire and the 9V battery method, I will surely use it when placing orchids on some plants

Yea.. that's the downside of D.E.  When wet, it is useless in deterring Slugs / Snails or other pesky insects ( though it will add good stuff to the soil, lol ) If only there was a way to coat the outside of pots w/ it, without it loosing it's benefits..

Agree, the 9 volt battery barrier idea was a "new to me" idea as well.

Beer and Salt traps seemed to work the best for me in the past, though with neighbors whose yards were just as full of snails as my yard, the traps only worked well for so long..

Will add, Lack of snail/ slug activity is one of the rarely noticed benefits of life in the Desert..  We have them, but have only seen one or two ..and mainly after a heavy downpour on a humid evening / morning during a wet Monsoon season., or among vegetation near washes /  rivers where it is cooler / moister.

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Reading the above problems with slugs and snails, I’m surprised that it isn’t a problem in my garden given the abundant moisture and humidity. I do see slug tracks and an occasional African snail, but have never noticed any damage to ornamentals or tender palm seedlings. Trust me, I feel fortunate NOT to have that problem. 

Anyway, here are a couple of photos of a palm trunk mounted orchid, it’s been previously posted and is in bloom again. 

Tim

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Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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6 minutes ago, realarch said:

Anyway, here are a couple of photos of a palm trunk mounted orchid, it’s been previously posted and is in bloom again. 

I’ve never seen a cymbidium mounted on a tree before as I usually see them terrestrial or in large pots.  Very nice display.

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What’s in bloom this week? Always a few surprises when I return to the island. 
A vanda popping one flower at a time:

1ED63C27-1073-4A6B-B711-39D9EE66682A.thumb.jpeg.b922eb7295fc0af24cc017bda7ceb9c0.jpeg

8F959103-48AB-466F-87B6-10E868DA8C95.thumb.jpeg.6ffedb53eba26a0440b5afa569a3b397.jpeg

68173258-9913-44E2-8EDB-43D12EA649D9.thumb.jpeg.6d12dbbc954fcc0774588cf45798362c.jpeg

307B3887-6CD5-433C-AB49-9D5EA9B2935B.thumb.jpeg.2ad7ee7f483a454894c721d6f1f8ac08.jpeg

My faithful cymbidium

9E07E649-839F-44E5-B822-474C2C803BCF.thumb.jpeg.57c8250a107691b44d3a67d11d21155b.jpeg

F2452F61-BA10-409C-B6AC-F4559DF40597.thumb.jpeg.92a032732e4ca5fa867b88e9dd44beb2.jpeg

 

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Kim Cyr

Between the beach and the bays, Point Loma, San Diego, California USA
and on a 300 year-old lava flow, Pahoa, Hawaii, 1/4 mile from the 2018 flow
All characters  in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

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Two more show offs:

0D991D21-61C7-48EE-B962-F0222DABA306.thumb.jpeg.87baaac6c63009b3aac5010f071855f6.jpeg

07A53D28-B4D0-4228-8EA5-A0875C86B521.thumb.jpeg.369f34354613769a9808aa406298bbcd.jpeg

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Kim Cyr

Between the beach and the bays, Point Loma, San Diego, California USA
and on a 300 year-old lava flow, Pahoa, Hawaii, 1/4 mile from the 2018 flow
All characters  in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

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5 hours ago, Kim said:

Two more show offs:

0D991D21-61C7-48EE-B962-F0222DABA306.thumb.jpeg.87baaac6c63009b3aac5010f071855f6.jpeg

07A53D28-B4D0-4228-8EA5-A0875C86B521.thumb.jpeg.369f34354613769a9808aa406298bbcd.jpeg

Very nice Ascocenda cross (last shot)  Imagine the near-neon Orange can be seen from a distance, esp. when sun is on the flowers. 

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