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Why not grow orchids?


Matt in SD

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3 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

That there is an excellent pink flowering form of Dendrobium farmeri specimen. D. chrysotoxum will be all yellow.. Sometime with ..or without the darker eye in the Labellum. Both should be fairly easy grows ( within the group of Dendrobium require a cool / or cold winter rest to initiate / set flowers buds )

Thanks Silas.  I knew you would know!  I like the cool /cold winter requirement, even indoors I have that in abundance:). I’ve been growing chrysotoxum for a year now and it’s setting buds!

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1 minute ago, piping plovers said:

Thanks Silas.  I knew you would know!  I like the cool /cold winter requirement, even indoors I have that in abundance:). I’ve been growing chrysotoxum for a year now and it’s setting buds!

:greenthumb: That whole group offers up a lot of neat Orchids to grow for sure.. Follow their basic requirements and most are generally not fussy, fairly adaptable, and don't take up a ton of space.. 

Someone told me, " Once you become comfortable growing these, you'll have an easy time growing many other Orchids " ..Not wrong at all.

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My orchids ( mostly cattleyas) have been kicked outdoors for the summer. They are happier and we finally got some room back in our house. My palms have also gone outside. I wait until the Japanese red maple and huge sycamore tree are leafing out to provide the right mix of dappled sunlight. They get good air movement when the afternoon seabreeze kicks in from the Bay. 

Photos of the some of the orchids and the shade trees where they take cover for the summer.
 
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1 hour ago, Tracy said:

Dendrobium chrysotoxum

Beautiful blooms.  

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That’s a nice orchid Tracy, are the blooms fragrant?

The first photo is a bromeliad tied to a palm trunk, the markings and color are pretty nice. I couldn’t resist posting it.

I don’t even remember seeing this orchid before let alone attaching it to the palm. Not too bad. 

Tim

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Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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34 minutes ago, realarch said:

The first photo is a bromeliad tied to a palm trunk, the markings and color are pretty nice. I couldn’t resist posting it.

I don’t even remember seeing this orchid before let alone attaching it to the palm. Not too bad. 

Tim, an amazing bromeliad.  I’ve never seen anything like that in bromeliad coloring combinations. Striking.

The orchid is reminding me of Laelia purpurata.

 

 

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16 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Tim, an amazing bromeliad.  I’ve never seen anything like that in bromeliad coloring combinations. Striking.

The orchid is reminding me of Laelia purpurata.

 

 

:greenthumb:  Thinking possibly a semi- alba form.  The species ( and some other S. American Laelia ) were also lumped in w/ Cattleya recently.

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17 hours ago, realarch said:

That’s a nice orchid Tracy, are the blooms fragrant?

Yes, the Dendrobium chrysotoxum flowers are very fragrant.  It was one of the reasons I decided to acquire it. 

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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Thanks Joe, Tracy, Nathan, for the replies and info. The orchid I posted isn’t particularly fragrant. 

Tim

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Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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On 5/18/2022 at 10:34 AM, realarch said:

Thanks Joe, Tracy, Nathan, for the replies and info. The orchid I posted isn’t particularly fragrant. 

Tim

:greenthumb: Agree, don't recall a purpurata specimen i had years ago as being all that fragrant. If it was, it was faint.  Most fragrant Cattleya i had were Brassolaeliocattleya ( BLC.) " Bryce Canyon Splendiferous ", and Cattleya intermedia ( Had the standard var. alba.  )

Laeliocattleya ( LC ) " Stonehouse " is another easy, and very fragrant Catt. Can flower 2 or 3x's a year, and grow to specimen size fairly quickly.

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Large classic white phaleonopsis: Phaleonopsis ‘White Dream’  ‘V.3’ AM/AOS 

First time blooming for me.

This is the only named phaleonopsis I own, all the others are Noid rescues from the grocery store 1/2 price shelf.  I bought this from Hausserman’s after receiving recommendations on the orchid board forum community for a large classic white phal. 
 

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After learning that Cattleya dowiana is part of the makeup of my favorite cattleya variety, I’ve been searching for one. This is my Second species cattleya; as I also own a trianae.

Was expecting a larger one from this importer. Reading that it likes dryness in the winter resting period I opted for a small clay pot rather than a plastic clear pot. Photos below of my new plant and also what I can expect in blooms someday.

I’m thinking this might be a 3 or 4 year wait for blooms given my windowsill growing conditions for winter.

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1 hour ago, piping plovers said:

After learning that Cattleya dowiana is part of the makeup of my favorite cattleya variety, I’ve been searching for one. This is my Second species cattleya; as I also own a trianae.

Was expecting a larger one from this importer. Reading that it likes dryness in the winter resting period I opted for a small clay pot rather than a plastic clear pot. Photos below of my new plant and also what I can expect in blooms someday.

I’m thinking this might be a 3 or 4 year wait for blooms given my windowsill growing conditions for winter.

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GREAT choice.. Is one of my favorite species Catt. as well..   As far as flowering, you might get lucky and only have to wait another year ..or 2  > at most <  for flowers.  Basing that on how healthy the bigger Pseudobulbs look now.  Look forward to updates on how your does.

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11 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

GREAT choice.. Is one of my favorite species Catt. as well..   As far as flowering, you might get lucky and only have to wait another year ..or 2  > at most <  for flowers.  Basing that on how healthy the bigger Pseudobulbs look now.  Look forward to updates on how your does.

Silas, thank you for the reply . I read the Chadwick’s article and pondered whether to purchase given my indoor conditions. I already know that I will keep it out of the sunroom because it’s 55F to 70F on the coldest days; the anthuriums and most palms seem to tolerate it.

Do you think I should grow it like a cactus or succulent in the winter, hot dry sunny window, 70F day and night temps ? Or maybe in a grow box for winter, heating pad beneath a clear plastic box (open top) that maintains 65F night and 75F day with 70 % humidity (this is my acclimating box I use) or is that too humid for winter rest? 
 

I think it will thrive outdoors here in summers but I’m concerned about winters. 70 F Days and nights are the warmest I can reasonably provide it given my typical indoor winter conditions.

 

Also, encouraging hearing your opinion that it may only be 2 years to bloom!
 

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39 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Silas, thank you for the reply . I read the Chadwick’s article and pondered whether to purchase given my indoor conditions. I already know that I will keep it out of the sunroom because it’s 55F to 70F on the coldest days; the anthuriums and most palms seem to tolerate it.

Do you think I should grow it like a cactus or succulent in the winter, hot dry sunny window, 70F day and night temps ? Or maybe in a grow box for winter, heating pad beneath a clear plastic box (open top) that maintains 65F night and 75F day with 70 % humidity (this is my acclimating box I use) or is that too humid for winter rest? 
 

I think it will thrive outdoors here in summers but I’m concerned about winters. 70 F Days and nights are the warmest I can reasonably provide it given my typical indoor winter conditions.

 

Also, encouraging hearing your opinion that it may only be 2 years to bloom!
 

:greenthumb:   Joe..

Read the same description from them as well..  While i'll defer expert level advise to the folks on the Orchid Board,  I did notice Chadwick's ..and a couple other Net info. sources list dowinia ( ..I keep wanting to call in downingiana for some reason ..err, haha ) as intermediate, so i'd assume it will handle temps down to somewhere in the 60s ( though some Cattleya listed as " Intermediate " have proven tolerating lower, into the 50s.. Don't think downiana would though. ) w/ out any issues. Have heard a 15-20? deg difference between night  and day temps is an important factor for healthy plants / encouraging blooms too ..but again, lol . expert growers will know if this species is alright w/ that -or not- better than i will.  

Seems the biggest factor i saw listed is overwatering  while napping in winter, so, yea, might treat the same way you might treat some cacti that like it dry that time of year.. Maybe misting it down w/ rain water once or twice.. but definitely not soaking it.   Seems like a lot of air circulation is another important factor for good growth also ( being that it grows high in tree tops )

If Humidity would be a factor indoors( needing more than most homes have ), wonder if using a humidifier where you'll overwinter it would help.. An expert grower question of course, haha..

Like i said, when it comes to when it should flower, Going w/ past experiences talking w/ growers when picking up plants i'd had... A couple people i'd bought from would even point out specimens among a group of plants that had bigger Pseudobulbs, indicating a plant that was near ..or was of  flowering age compared to others.   While tough to say w/ out actually seeing it, your specimen looks older than a seedling to my eye.. so, ..Question now is how long dowinia takes to reach flowering age.. Hopefully it isn't a slow poke..  Good care / nudging w/ some fertilizer should help it flower sooner as well.

If you talk w/ others on the Orchid Board about cultural advise, would enjoy hearing their thoughts..

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Thanks Silas for the very thorough reply, good information and experience here.  With my other catts I always thought I could stay within 55-90 range but have been learning over the years that below 60 doesn’t always work.

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My dendrobium chrysotoxum finally bloomed.  First time.  Purchased from ecuagenera last summer.

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14 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

dendrobium chrysotoxum finally bloomed.  First time

Interesting to see yours with the darker centers than the variety I am growing.  The one I have from Andy's Orchids is labeled from Thailand, but I know these have a much wider distribution, so perhaps it depends on the region they come from.  Congrats on the first bloom and hopefully many more in future years.  Have you caught the scent of yours yet?  They are fragrant, mine smelled of honey and mango (at least to this old nose).

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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12 minutes ago, Tracy said:

Interesting to see yours with the darker centers than the variety I am growing.  The one I have from Andy's Orchids is labeled from Thailand, but I know these have a much wider distribution, so perhaps it depends on the region they come from.  Congrats on the first bloom and hopefully many more in future years.  Have you caught the scent of yours yet?  They are fragrant, mine smelled of honey and mango (at least to this old nose).

Thank you Tracy.  Yes, I remember that you posted yours recently and when I looked back at your photo i realized that yours was lighter in center.  A friend of mine who traveled to Thailand years ago brought back one that looks like yours; to me that is actually the standard since that was the first I ever seen.  Mine has several years to go to put on the display like yours.

I noticed a slight pleasant fragrance today but flowers are not fully expanded.  I’ll see if the fragrance improves over the next week and provide update.

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Actually got this one from the orange store. Loved the deep purple/black and it has a great fragrance as well, once I smelled it, sold! This is the spike when I bought it, now it has a second spike coming, very happy.

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On 6/9/2022 at 8:05 PM, Tracy said:

Interesting to see yours with the darker centers than the variety I am growing.  The one I have from Andy's Orchids is labeled from Thailand, but I know these have a much wider distribution, so perhaps it depends on the region they come from. 

Tracy, i relooked at the tag and it is var. suavissimum from China.  It is increasing in fragrance.

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I went out this morning and discovered that Sobralia season has begun for my garden.  The first of this season is Sobralia macrantha

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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  • 2 weeks later...
5 hours ago, John hovancsek said:

Some new stuff and some in bloom in the garden 

Beautiful blooms.  Is that last photo a stanhopea?

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I’ve been posting on the Orchid Board forum and may have mentioned here that I’m in the process of transferring all my orchids out of wood baskets back into clay.  Tried it for approximately 8 years but I think it’s lead to decline in my collection’s health as it doesn’t work with my winter indoor growing conditions.

Here’s Brassia Edvah Loo ‘Nishida’.  I learned after a few of the basket breakdowns, that a pair of loppers is much easier and less brutal than using a handsaw. With loppers I cut the slats on one side down the middle and then across the bottom. I was then able to pull open the slats like a double door and it all pivoted and unfolded on the metal bar hinges away from the root mass. This orchid also was planted within a small clay pot within the basket years ago.

I transferred to a clay pot. It didn’t bloom this year but did bloom in two previous years. It should be putting on a show at this size.  I’m putting it in full sun from sunrise to 11 am as it was getting too much shade. I’ll watch it for burning.  I know much of the US has been under hot temps lately but in coastal New England I don’t think we broke 80 F for a high temperature in past week, and forecast for 70s so the foliage should not get too hot.  Afternoon sea breeze knocks down temps as well.

removing from basket 

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repot to clay 

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last year’s  bloom 

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Schoenorchis gemmata with some tiny, true miniature flowers.  It's hard to get a good photo without a macro lens.  Try to get it in focus and then crop seems to be the easiest option.

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/9/2022 at 8:05 PM, Tracy said:

Have you caught the scent of yours yet?  They are fragrant, mine smelled of honey and mango (at least to this old nose).

Yes definitely a mango scent.  I liked the way you described it.  Are the blooms only supposed to last one week?  It was in its full glory then I was away for a week and found the blooms shriveled.  I don’t think the sunroom got above 82 F that week.

anyone know about the aftercare—- do I keep on dry and sunny side ( mimic the tropical dry season) until roots and new growth appears?

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3 hours ago, piping plovers said:

Yes definitely a mango scent.  I liked the way you described it.  Are the blooms only supposed to last one week?  It was in its full glory then I was away for a week and found the blooms shriveled.  I don’t think the sunroom got above 82 F that week.

anyone know about the aftercare—- do I keep on dry and sunny side ( mimic the tropical dry season) until roots and new growth appears?

The week sounds about like how long mine lasted.  I am still watering mine but they do want a rest.  Growing them outdoors year round may be a little different.   My understanding is to keep it on the drier side when temps begin to cool.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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13 hours ago, Tracy said:

The week sounds about like how long mine lasted. 

Okay, good to know.  Thanks Tracy.  Hoping mine will start it’s growth phase soon as it is easier to mimic its warm rainy season in my summer outdoors rather than indoors after October when my heating season starts.  

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13 hours ago, Tracy said:

The week sounds about like how long mine lasted.  I am still watering mine but they do want a rest.  Growing them outdoors year round may be a little different.   My understanding is to keep it on the drier side when temps begin to cool.

 

22 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

 

Okay, good to know.  Thanks Tracy.  Hoping mine will start it’s growth phase soon as it is easier to mimic its warm rainy season in my summer outdoors rather than indoors after October when my heating season starts.  

Would follow the advise listed in the AOS cultural sheets for the " Callista " group of Dendrobiums..  Summer:  Keep warm ( 60-90F ) and provide medium amounts of water/ fert. / light..  Cooler ( around 50F ) w/ just enough water to keep the Pseudobulbs from shriveling in winter.. Same lighting as you'd provide in summer.. NO fert.

Most sps. in both sub- groups of Dendrobium ( there are 2 )  have very similar requirements as the Callista group,  w/ group #2 liking slightly warmer, though still cool winter temps.. Around 55F, vs. exposure to temps the 40s ..to about 50F,  to help initiate flowers ( Majority of sps. in Group #1 ). 

 

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8 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Would follow the advise listed in the AOS cultural sheets for the " Callista " group of Dendrobiums.. 

Thank you Silas.  Found the article and was a good read.  Interesting reading about the Indian monsoon forests going deciduous in the cool sunny winters.  With dendrobiums being such a large family, good to see some guidance to their groups.

another good article from Sonoma orchids* stated “…If this group of dendrobiums has a drawback, it is that the flowers are not particularly long-lasting, giving an unmatched dis­play for only two weeks before fading.”  *Article Credit given to Ed Nash. Reprinted with the permission of the American Orchid Society, May 1997 Orchids.

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Thank you Silas.  Found the article and was a good read.  Interesting reading about the Indian monsoon forests going deciduous in the cool sunny winters.  With dendrobiums being such a large family, good to see some guidance to their groups.

another good article from Sonoma orchids* stated “…If this group of dendrobiums has a drawback, it is that the flowers are not particularly long-lasting, giving an unmatched dis­play for only two weeks before fading.”  *Article Credit given to Ed Nash. Reprinted with the permission of the American Orchid Society, May 1997 Orchids.

 

 

 

Yea that's about the only drawback i found growing them.. Even your standard D. nobile, individual flowers only stayed open about a week to 10 days...  Being able to leave them to do their own thing, compared to some other Orchids that can be a bit more fussy at times is priceless though.

 

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Here's a combo you might not anticipate:  Orchids and Saguaro..  With the Orchids recently being re-discovered ( along w/ at least one new Orchid species, & some other assumed- to- be locally extinct plant species.. )  in the upper reaches of Saguaro Park East / Rincon Mountains..

https://tucson.com/news/local/lost-plants-found-in-tucsons-saguaro-national-park/article_62dac9a8-daeb-11ec-899d-2776d5e08613.html

Article also serves as an example of why regular surveys of plant and animal life in a given area should be done constantly, especially in tougher to access areas where environmentally abusive humans can't screw with things as easily..

 

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15 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Here's a combo you might not anticipate:  Orchids and Saguaro..

Fascinating article and discovery Silas.  Then to read about even the presence of bogs along with saguaros  and orchids.

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4 hours ago, piping plovers said:

Fascinating article and discovery Silas.  Then to read about even the presence of bogs along with saguaros  and orchids.

 Arizona ..and New Mexico.. may be about as biologically diverse places as California or Texas  containing some eye opening and extremely un- expected habitats in such a small area -relatively speaking..  Standing in Yuma when it is 116F out and there's plenty of dust, but barely any moisture in the air, you'd never assume there were lush and cool mountain meadows full of plants and landscapes you'd anticipate seeing in the Rockies just a few hours drive northeast, up in the White Mountains of east central AZ.


Heck, lol one can reach some of the same kind of habitat in less than an hour by driving up to Mt Lemmon in the Catalinas from Downtown Tucson.  Both the Catalinas and Rincons ( Mountain " island " just south of the Catalinas ) were important refuges for plants and animals from both the last Ice Age, and when the dry tropical forests that are currently laid out across the foothills starting approximately 70 -100 miles south of the U.S. Mexico border, extended up to ~roughly~ Central AZ, maybe a little further north and west.


From Mt. Lemmon, one can look down upon the Sonoran Desert ( stretching from Tucson to the west / southwest / northwest) The northwestern extent of the Chihuahuan Desert ( Southeast corner of AZ )  and due south, down into the heart of the Madrean Pine/ Oak Woodlands that cover the mountains on either side of the border, and stretch all the way down the length of Mexico..  Each, distinctly different area contributing it's own palate of plants to what can be encountered if someone spends enough time looking around.

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7 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Both the Catalinas and Rincons ( Mountain " island " just south of the Catalinas ) were important refuges for plants and animals from both the last Ice Age, and when the dry tropical forests that are currently laid out across the foothills starting approximately 70 -100 miles south of the U.S. Mexico border, extended up to ~roughly~ Central AZ, maybe a little further north and west.

That’s amazing to ponder.  I like reading about the world climates during the ice ages and which parts of the continents (as they shifted) remained in the tropics; which forests were allowed to continue on without the killing ice ages.

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