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One very large container grown Bismarck palm


happypalms

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Spotted this huge Bismarck palm in a rather large container in excellent condition giving the groundskeeper bonus points for such gardening skills another tough survivor in India 

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Looks amazing! Is it field grown and transplanted up there? 
I am a little worried the trunk will expand even more causing some issues. 

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Might the pot bottom be open to the ground ? 

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San Francisco, California

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35 minutes ago, Darold Petty said:

Might the pot bottom be open to the ground ? 

i agree with darold.  i bet the bottom of the planter is open to the ground therefore giving it unlimited supply for the roots to disperse.  in any case, it does look very healthy.

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My Santa Clarita Oasis

"delectare et movere"

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I am curious about where those pics were taken?

Does not look like NSW.

The other pinnate palms look like very unhappy foxtails to me, but could be sick royals also.

Those containers are definitely in danger of a breakage if the bismarck continue their growth.

Located on Vanua Levu near Savusavu (16degrees South) Elevation from sealevel to 30meters with average annual rainfall of 2800mm (110in) with temperature from 18 to 34C (65 to 92F).

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7 hours ago, fiji jim said:

I am curious about where those pics were taken?

Does not look like NSW.

The other pinnate palms look like very unhappy foxtails to me, but could be sick royals also.

Those containers are definitely in danger of a breakage if the bismarck continue their growth.

No it’s not nsw it’s in the Punjab India I took the photos one week ago 

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14 hours ago, ZPalms said:

That royal looks like crap if it is a royal, but the bizzy is happy

Oh the conditions of some of the palms I saw in India due to pollution was incredible however they did have a very cold winter minus 3 degrees Celsius I was told that may have caused some of the conditions but iam pretty sure the pollution is the source of there troubles 

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15 hours ago, Palmfarmer said:

Looks amazing! Is it field grown and transplanted up there? 
I am a little worried the trunk will expand even more causing some issues. 

 Not  sure as how it came to be in the container the photo was taken in India so anything goes there in that country 

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14 hours ago, Darold Petty said:

Might the pot bottom be open to the ground ? 

The palm is outside a huge wedding venue that is hired out for weddings it is possible that the roots go through but  they do things pretty cheap and rough in India so it could be just in the container 

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He's putting on some stout trunk for being completely container bound. The palm was most likely field grown and then dug, root-hacked and then shoved in the planter; even though the planter does not look like it opens or can be moved. Unless the top part is sectional and can be removed.

If he was grown in there, then he was extremely well taken care of (in lieu of those poor Foxtails). He shows no signs of leaning away or trying to shift a bit away from the building. The size of the base and trunk shows signs of regular irrigation, either by hand or built-in, that I cannot see (if he was grown in place). The pavers underneath could be open to the ground, but for functional reasons probably not. They might not want him to root in, as it would make removing him more difficult when he starts to decline. It would also allow him to grow faster and out-grow the planter. A puzzle for sure. I would have needed a closer look, as my curiosity would have dragged me in. 

If there is any way for his roots to reach the ground, that Bismarck will find it.

Ryan

South Florida

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The other sick palms are doing what my Wodyetia did after about 8 years in the ground at my new house. It took almost three years to die. I noticed when it first started going bad and I went to my nursery where the guy who started my palm journey was manager . We tried many different applications of various minerals spread over three years but it just would not pull out of it. In my area , they either grow like weeds or start looking like these after perhaps years of decent growth. It is a palm that needs to be planted with that in mind , at least in my area. The container grown Bizmarkia are a mystery , for sure.Harry

Edited by Harry’s Palms
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2 hours ago, happypalms said:

The palm is outside a huge wedding venue that is hired out for weddings ...

If they weren't busy, time with a venue manager or groundkeeper would have been great to ask questions about the landscape. Often, they are very proud of their slice of wedding heaven and love to talk about it.

Ryan

South Florida

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9 hours ago, Palmarum said:

If they weren't busy, time with a venue manager or groundkeeper would have been great to ask questions about the landscape. Often, they are very proud of their slice of wedding heaven and love to talk about it.

Ryan

Proud is a understatement obsession with weddings more like it with a wedding going for five days in what seems like complete mayhem to a foreign person watching for the first time with traditional aspects combined now with 20th century high tech truly amazing to see and the amount of food each day is amazing 

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9 hours ago, Palmarum said:

He's putting on some stout trunk for being completely container bound. The palm was most likely field grown and then dug, root-hacked and then shoved in the planter; even though the planter does not look like it opens or can be moved. Unless the top part is sectional and can be removed.

If he was grown in there, then he was extremely well taken care of (in lieu of those poor Foxtails). He shows no signs of leaning away or trying to shift a bit away from the building. The size of the base and trunk shows signs of regular irrigation, either by hand or built-in, that I cannot see (if he was grown in place). The pavers underneath could be open to the ground, but for functional reasons probably not. They might not want him to root in, as it would make removing him more difficult when he starts to decline. It would also allow him to grow faster and out-grow the planter. A puzzle for sure. I would have needed a closer look, as my curiosity would have dragged me in. 

If there is any way for his roots to reach the ground, that Bismarck will find it.

Ryan

Iam pretty confident it was just in the container alone not growing into the ground there was two them either side of the entrance creating quite an affect it was most likely hand watered 

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12 hours ago, happypalms said:

Oh the conditions of some of the palms I saw in India due to pollution was incredible however they did have a very cold winter minus 3 degrees Celsius I was told that may have caused some of the conditions but iam pretty sure the pollution is the source of there troubles 

Wait I didn't know pollution affects palms? Is it the lack of sunlight or?

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