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Naturally occurring tropical plants as an indication of climate/'zones'


Jimbean

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15 minutes ago, Jimbean said:

For a specific county,  or.... ??

" Areca " palms are introduced / escapees rather than naturally occurring / native.



Forgot ..or planning on adding later???

Allspice ( ..and Bay Rum  ..though long term  nativity of it to FL can be questioned )

Gumbo Limbo

Cinnacord,  ..and Pineland Acacia

False Tamarind ( Lysiloma latiisiliquum  )

Seven Year Apple

Myrsine

Washwood / Braceletwood ( Genus Jacquina )

Manchaneel

Poisonwood ( Different Genus than Manchaneel, just as nasty if handled )

Orange Geiger Tree

Locustberry

Some have said ..One of the Plumeria  sps that occurs in either the Bahamas ..and / or Cuba may have also made it to the Keys naturally..

...I'm sure i'm forgetting a bunch of others..

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18 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

For a specific county,  or.... ??

" Areca " palms are introduced / escapees rather than naturally occurring / native.



Forgot ..or planning on adding later???

Allspice ( ..and Bay Rum  ..though long term  nativity of it to FL can be questioned )

Gumbo Limbo

Cinnacord,  ..and Pineland Acacia

False Tamarind ( Lysiloma latiisiliquum  )

Seven Year Apple

Myrsine

Washwood / Braceletwood ( Genus Jacquina )

Manchaneel

Poisonwood ( Different Genus than Manchaneel, just as nasty if handled )

Orange Geiger Tree

Locustberry

Some have said ..One of the Plumeria  sps that occurs in either the Bahamas ..and / or Cuba may have also made it to the Keys naturally..

...I'm sure i'm forgetting a bunch of others..

There's a lot of other species.  Dypsis lutescens isn't native, but wouldn't escapees be considered naturally occurring?  

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Brevard County, Fl

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4 minutes ago, Jimbean said:

There's a lot of other species.  Dypsis lutescens isn't native, but wouldn't escapees be considered naturally occurring?  

I myself would consider it an escapee, trying to establish itself in an ideal environment far from home,  rather than something that naturally occurs  ..In the sense that " naturally"  implies that it had evolved in X area.. If that makes any sense..


Same idea w/ Buffelgrass and Stinknet, ...or any Phoenix  specimens discovered growing in natural areas here ..or in California / elsewhere in the world  where they did not evolve / originate but could try to establish populations. ...All are introduced escapees growing in an ideal place,  far removed from where they evolved / diverged.  

If a plant Genus or subfamily didn't originate / evolve within our hemisphere ( North, Central, and / or S. America ), it is an introduced species. 

Some may call species in the Genus Harpagophytum  " Devil's Claws "  but,  they aren't..   They evolved in African Deserts under broadly similar, but very different finer scale level climate differences that influenced their biology / physiology,  unlike Proboscidea,  the real Devil's Claw,  which evolved in the Americas, under what climate details influenced their evolution..  

Were any of the true  Devil's Claw species to escape cultivation in S. Africa after introduction, they'd be considered non native escapees..  Vise versa on Africa's version if they turned up here. Both are very neat groups of plants.

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Got nice pollinator magnets White and Simpson Stopper, Locustberry and Lignum Vitae thriving in the garden.  It's important to remember that the natives are much more tolerant of temperature extremes than exotics of the "same" zone.

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Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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