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BUTIA ODORATA


sped94

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Hi everyone,

I would like to buy a Butia Odorata and plant it  in my garden. I read that this plant is very resistant, is this true? In your opinion, is it more resistant than a Phoenix Canariensis?

Where I live minimum temperatures at night often drop to around 0C/32F, however temperatures below -5C/23F are quite rare. The climate is very different from that of the USA, in the sense that temperatures have a very regular trend and rarely deviate much from the average (extremes are very rare). By the way, the lowest temperature ever recorded was -12C/10F in 1985, and more recently -10C/14F in 2010.

In winter it doesn’t rain much and snow is very rare.

Attached you can find the temperatures of January 2024

 

Immagine 2024-01-31 105539.png

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B. odorata should be fine at those temperatures. Dry cold is much better than wet cold. If you can grow canariensis in the ground then odorata will be no problem at all. There are Butias in the UK that have survived worse Januaries than that and wet ones to boot.

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3 hours ago, PalmsandLiszt said:

B. odorata should be fine at those temperatures. Dry cold is much better than wet cold. If you can grow canariensis in the ground then odorata will be no problem at all. There are Butias in the UK that have survived worse Januaries than that and wet ones to boot.

Thank you! I'm worried because, although it doesn't rain much, the humidity is always high. Plus the soil is clayey... I hope this is not a problem...

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I agree, should be just fine.  I would try to improve the drainage through, that will help in winter.

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4 hours ago, sped94 said:

I would like to buy a Butia Odorata and plant it  in my garden. I read that this plant is very resistant, is this true? In your opinion, is it more resistant than a Phoenix Canariensis?

That depends. In my experience, mature Canariensis are hardier than mature Odorata, however, the Canariensis suffers from the fusarium wilt which kills them like flies. Many nurseries have stopped offering them here. 

Your winters sound great for the Butia. I'd be more concerned if your summers are hot and sunny enough for some good growth!

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4 minutes ago, Swolte said:

That depends. In my experience, mature Canariensis are hardier than mature Odorata, however, the Canariensis suffers from the fusarium wilt which kills them like flies. Many nurseries have stopped offering them here. 

Your winters sound great for the Butia. I'd be more concerned if your summers are hot and sunny enough for some good growth!

So i think i will buy this Butia :)

yes, summers are sunny and hot with average maximum temperatures of 30 degrees.
Just a few thunderstorms every now and then.

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