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Spring 2024: What did you plant this week?


Xenon

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Starting tomorrow, I officially declare winter to be over. Had more than enough of it. Basta! I am packing up my frost blankets, buckets, and multiple piles of leaves. 

To celebrate the arrival of Spring, I planted a Dioon Edule 'Rio Verde' and a Sabal Bermudana!
😊

Dioon Edule.JPG

Bermudana.JPG

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On 2/16/2024 at 5:02 PM, MarcusH said:

We are cursed lol.  We aren't as blessed as most parts in Florida and California where you can plant so many different kind of palms.  The cold air can reach as far as the Rio Grande Valley . We're prone to cold winter outbreaks.  

That’s so not cool but at least you can easily get replacement palms down there.. Good luck up here as the prices, availability and severity of weather conditions make it impossible to be successful up here  on the west coast. Currently we have drought conditions. Lack of winter snow on our mountains is leading us to a water shortage situation for the region in the summer. Thinking of moving to Florida my favorite state in the future!

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Cold one last night, we were right around freezing but it’s heating up fast. 50f and climbing as of 10 am.  After today upper 70s and 80s going forward. Not a palm but I did plant my Gold Nugget Loquat yesterday. A few more things might make it into the ground today. 

IMG_9082.jpeg

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More planting today. Trying to get in the trees first. Later the surrounding area will be all garden bed and filled with shrubs and perennials. Today a queen palm and two Barbados Cherry. Tomorrow will be Texas Mountain laurel and two BxJ. 

IMG_9085.jpeg

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On 2/11/2024 at 4:48 AM, Leelanau Palms said:

Where did you get it? Looks great!

What is the palm behind it?

I got that waggie from @Jubaea_James760he always has cool stuff for sale. Yuccas, agaves, cycads too. The palm behind it is a Sabal Louisiana

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Looking great! I bet you have a lot of experience from the previous place.  I notice you stayed well clear of fence for primary plants. 

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YouTube https://www.youtube.com/@tntropics - 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size, 3 dwarf),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), etonia (1) louisiana(5), palmetto (1), riverside (1),  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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15 minutes ago, Allen said:

Looking great! I bet you have a lot of experience from the previous place.  I notice you stayed well clear of fence for primary plants. 

Thanks, It's pretty plain jane at the moment but the shape of the garden will be revealed eventually.  I have a drainage ditch back there that I want to keep free as well as having easy access to the fence.  Everything is 5' or more away depending on the growth habit.  Bushier things further away, tall skinny palms like robusta and queens are five foot away.  I do want a jungle look but I'm trying to space things out further.  This is only one small section of the new yard, but its an area that no work or hardscape that will be occurring.  Trying to get some things in before it gets super hot.

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I didn't plant anything this week but I did dig up and remove 2 azaleas creating a blank new spot for me to put something new in :greenthumb:

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2 hours ago, Chester B said:

More planting today. Trying to get in the trees first. Later the surrounding area will be all garden bed and filled with shrubs and perennials. Today a queen palm and two Barbados Cherry. Tomorrow will be Texas Mountain laurel and two BxJ. 

IMG_9085.jpeg

Just curious why you have everything planted so high above grade? Especially the palms, seems like a lot of root will be exposed later on.  

The Barbados cherries look like Malphigia emarginata. It's the very tender tropical form, damage in the mid 30s and dies in the 20s

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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1 hour ago, Xenon said:

Just curious why you have everything planted so high above grade? Especially the palms, seems like a lot of root will be exposed later on.  

The Barbados cherries look like Malphigia emarginata. It's the very tender tropical form, damage in the mid 30s and dies in the 20s

Everything is high on purpose.  I have the crappy clay soil.  I have amended it and am raising the plants above it that much more.  The rest of the spaces in between will be sheet mulched and soil added to the same level as these plants, so essentially it will all be a raised bed garden.  I'm trying to get in some of the bigger stuff now so it will have more time in the ground before it gets hot.  I have all the cardboard I need from moving, but need to bring in a truck load or two of soil and the same of mulch for this bed.  It's the first area I am developing.  Once I have the bed in place I can bring in the medium to small sized items.

As far as the cherries, I do know they are somewhat tender.  Everything I've read and watched on them says they should be ok in a "normal" winter.  I guess we'll see.  I am willing to roll the dice here and there with plants.  

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44 minutes ago, Chester B said:

 

As far as the cherries, I do know they are somewhat tender.  Everything I've read and watched on them says they should be ok in a "normal" winter.  I guess we'll see.  I am willing to roll the dice here and there with plants.  

I'm pretty sure the queens love the crappy clay soil, waterlogging floods and all 😛.  The reason they look pretty good in Htown is probably down to the heavier gumbo clay soil. Washies won't care either way. 

There's a lot of misinformation about the two forms of "Barbados cherry". Malphigia glabra is the "native Barbados cherry" that is hardy into the low 20s but the fruits are much smaller.  It's somewhat hard to find. The tropical form that is commonly sold is VERY tender, solid zone 10 plant (says me the avid zone pusher, it's one of the things I have to keep potted and drag in/out). 

P.S. where are the citrus trees?? You need some (or a dozen) 😄

Edited by Xenon
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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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4 hours ago, Chester B said:

More planting today. Trying to get in the trees first. Later the surrounding area will be all garden bed and filled with shrubs and perennials. Today a queen palm and two Barbados Cherry. Tomorrow will be Texas Mountain laurel and two BxJ. 

Holy, you're not holding back on putting things in the ground! You had your vision already?! 
:)
I personally love elevation differences as they allow me to play around with more plants, drainage issues, etc... besides, if you plant it level, it will be hard to raise it at a later stage!  You can always raise surrounding area (sounds like that is what you are doing). 

 

7 minutes ago, Xenon said:

Malphigia glabra is the "native Barbados cherry" that is hardy into the low 20s

Mine even returned from 5F unprotected. Great plant! Very drought tolerant too.

Edited by Swolte
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1 minute ago, Swolte said:

 

Mine even returned from 5F unprotected. Great plant! Very drought tolerant too.

Do you get fruit the following season after it freezes to the ground? 

Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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Just now, Xenon said:

Do you get fruit the following season after it freezes to the ground? 

Honestly, I can't remember! I'll check this year as it went through 12F unprotected.  

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6 hours ago, Chester B said:

Everything is high on purpose.  I have the crappy clay soil.  I have amended it and am raising the plants above it that much more.  The rest of the spaces in between will be sheet mulched and soil added to the same level as these plants, so essentially it will all be a raised bed garden.  I'm trying to get in some of the bigger stuff now so it will have more time in the ground before it gets hot.  I have all the cardboard I need from moving, but need to bring in a truck load or two of soil and the same of mulch for this bed.  It's the first area I am developing.  Once I have the bed in place I can bring in the medium to small sized items.

As far as the cherries, I do know they are somewhat tender.  Everything I've read and watched on them says they should be ok in a "normal" winter.  I guess we'll see.  I am willing to roll the dice here and there with plants.  

The clay soil we have in San Antonio is full of nutrients.  We have clay soil in our yard.  I don't need to fertilize any plants or trees and they seem to love our soil .I only fertilize my palms for faster growth.  But seriously I don't think it's a good idea to plant your palms that high in fact you're the only person I know who does that . Haven't seen it anywhere else where I went unless it was an elevated flower bed .  If you google it it says don't plant your palm tree too low or too high.  You're creating a problem, especially Queens don't grow deep roots there are the first one that will tip over. Your other palm tree could tip over on a stormy day as well.  

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14 hours ago, Chester B said:

Texas Mountain laurel

be careful if you have a dog, they are fatally poisonous to humans and animals

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Lucas

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3 hours ago, MarcusH said:

The clay soil we have in San Antonio is full of nutrients.  We have clay soil in our yard.  I don't need to fertilize any plants or trees and they seem to love our soil .I only fertilize my palms for faster growth.  But seriously I don't think it's a good idea to plant your palms that high in fact you're the only person I know who does that . Haven't seen it anywhere else where I went unless it was an elevated flower bed .  If you google it it says don't plant your palm tree too low or too high.  You're creating a problem, especially Queens don't grow deep roots there are the first one that will tip over. Your other palm tree could tip over on a stormy day as well.  

Marcus is right, the clay soil isn't crappy,

 

10 hours ago, Chester B said:

Everything is high on purpose.  I have the crappy clay soil. 

plants can grow in it just fine, the soils going to be like that in most of this part of Texas, but the storms and the winds soon are going to be ripping those around

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Lucas

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54 minutes ago, Little Tex said:

Marcus is right, the clay soil isn't crappy,

 

plants can grow in it just fine, the soils going to be like that in most of this part of Texas, but the storms and the winds soon are going to be ripping those around

We aren't telling you what you can't do just a friendly advice from us. The soil won't cause you any problems,  look around you I see palm trees all over Houston and in a lot of other places across Texas with the same type of soil. As a matter of fact clay keeps the soil moistured for longer 😉.  Digging holes nah not so much fun.  Clay is your friend they love it here. 

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I'm going to reiterate that the mounds are temporary, the soil surrounding them will all be raised to the same level.  The whole area will be raised up at least 6" if not more,  The plants will all be at ground level with wells around them to ease in watering.  I usually make the raised bed first and add the plants after.  When I put in a new garden of this size it generally takes me about 4 days.  But with the big move I'm very busy and just picking away at some small things first before I start getting truckloads of soil.  In a couple weeks I plant to take a long weekend to get this done

I've worked with clay in every home I've had, and it's just a real PITA.  I agree its nutritious and that's great, but most plants appreciate well draining soil.  So having a good rich top layer of a foot where it transitions to clay is beneficial.  It does help to keep the clay moist, throughout summer.  Once clay dries out its next to impossible to rehydrate.  In my area we have a lot standing water when it rains, including in my yard so I do need the elevation for many of the plants.  When the plants are put in they are dug down into the native clay layer.  The soil that I add on top will compress and be worked down deeper by the worms.  Right now all I see when I dig are beetle grubs, I've only encountered one worm, which is not a good sign.

Once everything is in, mulched and heavily watered it will all lock in.  My last house experienced a lot of high winds due to the Columbia river gorge.  Sustained high winds with terrible gusts.  We did get hurricane force winds there, both in summer and winter.  I can tell you these plants  will be fine.  The barbados cherry will need some supports but the rest will be ok.

Sabals, needles and Trachys don't mind the boggy conditions, but other palms and plants I will be growing do.  It's good to hear that Queens like these conditions too, it was my suspicion but I hadn't had a chance to ask.

And yes I have a few citrus which require well draining soil.  So far a Meyer lemon, a Cara Cara Orange, a Silverhill Satsuma and Key lime which will live in a pot.  I have a couple of real nice south facing locations that I'm hoping to fit the bill.  

I didn't know TX Mtn Laurel was poisonous, that is good to know.  Fortunately my dogs leave plants alone.  If you actually looked up every plant in your garden you would be surprised how many are actually toxic.

Thank you for all your tips and concerns.  This is not the finished product, just the beginning.  Pictures below of the last section of garden I developed at my old house, it was raised up 6" at the front and 12' at the back.  This is what the area will be like when done.

IMG_7605.jpeg

IMG_5435.jpeg

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50 minutes ago, Chester B said:

I'm going to reiterate that the mounds are temporary, the soil surrounding them will all be raised to the same level.  The whole area will be raised up at least 6" if not more,  The plants will all be at ground level with wells around them to ease in watering.  I usually make the raised bed first and add the plants after.  When I put in a new garden of this size it generally takes me about 4 days.  But with the big move I'm very busy and just picking away at some small things first before I start getting truckloads of soil.  In a couple weeks I plant to take a long weekend to get this done

I've worked with clay in every home I've had, and it's just a real PITA.  I agree its nutritious and that's great, but most plants appreciate well draining soil.  So having a good rich top layer of a foot where it transitions to clay is beneficial.  It does help to keep the clay moist, throughout summer.  Once clay dries out its next to impossible to rehydrate.  In my area we have a lot standing water when it rains, including in my yard so I do need the elevation for many of the plants.  When the plants are put in they are dug down into the native clay layer.  The soil that I add on top will compress and be worked down deeper by the worms.  Right now all I see when I dig are beetle grubs, I've only encountered one worm, which is not a good sign.

Once everything is in, mulched and heavily watered it will all lock in.  My last house experienced a lot of high winds due to the Columbia river gorge.  Sustained high winds with terrible gusts.  We did get hurricane force winds there, both in summer and winter.  I can tell you these plants  will be fine.  The barbados cherry will need some supports but the rest will be ok.

Sabals, needles and Trachys don't mind the boggy conditions, but other palms and plants I will be growing do.  It's good to hear that Queens like these conditions too, it was my suspicion but I hadn't had a chance to ask.

And yes I have a few citrus which require well draining soil.  So far a Meyer lemon, a Cara Cara Orange, a Silverhill Satsuma and Key lime which will live in a pot.  I have a couple of real nice south facing locations that I'm hoping to fit the bill.  

I didn't know TX Mtn Laurel was poisonous, that is good to know.  Fortunately my dogs leave plants alone.  If you actually looked up every plant in your garden you would be surprised how many are actually toxic.

Thank you for all your tips and concerns.  This is not the finished product, just the beginning.  Pictures below of the last section of garden I developed at my old house, it was raised up 6" at the front and 12' at the back.  This is what the area will be like when done.

IMG_7605.jpeg

IMG_5435.jpeg

All good brother, now you explained the situation.  I agree with you about once clay is dry it takes a lot of water to get to the point where it can absorb water . Here in San Antonio our droughts are more severe . Less humidity,  less cloud cover,  hotter summers and less rain compared to Houston so I know what you're talking about. But seriously things grow well here without changing the soil. Might take a bit longer for plants to establish but once they're established no biggie.  I just speak for myself I have zero issues with whatever grows in our yard or what I have planted. We water our yards around the foundation as well to lower the risks of foundation cracks, water leaks etc  which are very common in San Antonio.  The ground moves in San Antonio.  Houston is just a lite version of New Orleans it's sinking and is prone to flooding so no matter where you move there's always something. 

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20 minutes ago, MarcusH said:

We water our yards around the foundation as well to lower the risks of foundation cracks, water leaks etc  which are very common in San Antonio. 

Fortunately I had a a number of people tell me this, otherwise I would've never known.  I thought the soil in San Antonio was more rocky and that caliche type, but I guess that's more of an Austin thing.

When you talk with Master gardeners they always talk about their soil.  The better your soil, the better success you will have.   Our soils in typical suburban lots are not very functional, so it is very beneficial to restore it to more of a natural state.  In wild places the leaf litter and debris from plants is left and gets broken down into the soil.  Think of forest loam or an intact grassland.  There are plants like many from the Mediterranean or Australia that are adapted to poor soils so don't need it, but a lot of what I will be growing will.

At my last place I struggled in the beginning with the poor soil and plants surviving in it, never mind thriving.  The more I improved it and the more nitrogen fixing and pioneer species I added the easier it got.  By the end just about everything lived and thrived.  My underground ecosystem was thriving with worms, invertebrates and mycorrhizae.  A healthy soil results in faster growing and healthier plants that are better able to tolerate wild swings in climate.  You know the old saying a $5 hole for a $1 plant.

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3 minutes ago, Chester B said:

Fortunately I had a a number of people tell me this, otherwise I would've never known.  I thought the soil in San Antonio was more rocky and that caliche type, but I guess that's more of an Austin thing.

When you talk with Master gardeners they always talk about their soil.  The better your soil, the better success you will have.   Our soils in typical suburban lots are not very functional, so it is very beneficial to restore it to more of a natural state.  In wild places the leaf litter and debris from plants is left and gets broken down into the soil.  Think of forest loam or an intact grassland.  There are plants like many from the Mediterranean or Australia that are adapted to poor soils so don't need it, but a lot of what I will be growing will.

At my last place I struggled in the beginning with the poor soil and plants surviving in it, never mind thriving.  The more I improved it and the more nitrogen fixing and pioneer species I added the easier it got.  By the end just about everything lived and thrived.  My underground ecosystem was thriving with worms, invertebrates and mycorrhizae.  A healthy soil results in faster growing and healthier plants that are better able to tolerate wild swings in climate.  You know the old saying a $5 hole for a $1 plant.

You're absolutely right soil is the key to success for plant growing .  To add something to it our house was build in 1974 we do have a lot of different mature trees around us with one large oak tree growing on the neighbor's property at the backside of our house. I would assume that over time the ground became more rich in nutrients . We love mulching our flower bed we use either brown mulch or some cypress mulch for contrast.  Most of San Antonio has loamy soil a combination of sandy, clay and silt particles , it's considered the most fertile of soils but sandy soil is also common on the Southside.  That changes quickly if you're getting closer to the Hill Country (SA Far NW side) That's one of the worst type of soil you can imagine . Takes dynamite to create a hole but yet there's vegetation.  Cedar trees (🤒😮‍💨🤧) like it as well as different types of desert plants from cacti to agaves. 

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2 hours ago, MarcusH said:

You're absolutely right soil is the key to success for plant growing .  To add something to it our house was build in 1974 we do have a lot of different mature trees around us with one large oak tree growing on the neighbor's property at the backside of our house. I would assume that over time the ground became more rich in nutrients . We love mulching our flower bed we use either brown mulch or some cypress mulch for contrast.  Most of San Antonio has loamy soil a combination of sandy, clay and silt particles , it's considered the most fertile of soils but sandy soil is also common on the Southside.  That changes quickly if you're getting closer to the Hill Country (SA Far NW side) That's one of the worst type of soil you can imagine . Takes dynamite to create a hole but yet there's vegetation.  Cedar trees (🤒😮‍💨🤧) like it as well as different types of desert plants from cacti to agaves. 

You're lucky with that soil.  I essentially live in a swamp, water is all around with a lot of maintained as a natural area and in my neighborhood we have canals/bayous all over.  I'm a little terrified about the mosquitos, they're already out.  I'm expecting it to get much worse.

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55 minutes ago, Chester B said:

You're lucky with that soil.  I essentially live in a swamp, water is all around with a lot of maintained as a natural area and in my neighborhood we have canals/bayous all over.  I'm a little terrified about the mosquitos, they're already out.  I'm expecting it to get much worse.

OFF spray is going to be your best friend from spring to fall . I get beaten up by mosquitoes every year but they leave my wife alone so it really depends on your odor.  We water our yards frequently, they like to call our place home. I expect them to be worse in certain parts in Houston.  The heat will be your challenge.  Work early in the morning because by the time it's noon it's already too hot . Texas summers are unbearable. 

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Hit 85 today, we are definitely subtropical. So far I’ve planted 2 rose bushes, one sago that I did cover but the leaves are yellow and have about 20 strap leaf palms. When should I plant them, now or wait until next year? W think I finally figured out this Oklahoma weather where I live, protect them a few days in January and February, not the whole month. On a side note, what’s the fastest growing blue palm, I keep thinking about getting an armata but I can only find the seeds and they can take up to a year to germinate.

Edited by Jerrrod
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On 2/21/2024 at 2:21 PM, Chester B said:

You're lucky with that soil.  I essentially live in a swamp, water is all around with a lot of maintained as a natural area and in my neighborhood we have canals/bayous all over.  I'm a little terrified about the mosquitos, they're already out.  I'm expecting it to get much worse.

Being in an area like that I’d be less concerned about mosquitoes and more concerned about flooding risk. Either way, bug spray is a must anywhere in the south during summer. Mosquitoes are particularly bad in the late afternoon.

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Palms - 4 S. romanzoffiana, 1 W. bifurcata, 4 W. robusta, 1 R. rivularis, 1 B. odorata, 1 B. nobilis, 4 S. palmetto, 1 A. merillii, 2 P. canariensis, 1 BxJ, 1 BxJxBxS, 1 BxS, 3 P. roebelenii, 1 H. lagenicaulis, 1 H. verschaffeltii, 9 T. fortunei, 1 C. humilis, 2 C. macrocarpa, 1 L. chinensis, 1 R. excelsa

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Chamaedorea microspadix

Chamaedorea Costaricana

Phoenix roebelenii x Phoenix reclianta

Sabal minor ‘McCurtain’

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I'll be doing some plantings this weekend.  I have a couple of young Filiferas to plant as well as a couple of young Canary Island Dates (nothing above my skill level).  I just enjoy planting stuff as a hobby more or less.  Something about getting outside and planting things.  Helping out the wildlife as a side product is also a bonus.

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Planting season officially started for me today.  We started off with a replacement Copernicia Alba and a long shot Chamaedorea Tepejilote under oak canopy.  The chamaedorea is growing out of some frost burn.  Lots more zone pushes to come.20240224_144438.thumb.jpg.7aa2031def133afde34253d93a2778e4.jpg

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Today we got the triangle in the ground.  Not the most ideal spot aesthetically because it's kind of buried in the beck corner, but the dry-ish with full sun and canopy options were limited.  This spot is pretty protected from the obnoxious wind we get here too.  We'll see how this goes.

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Started on my front yard. These existing gardens will be “HOA friendly”. The landscaping in my neighborhood is bland at best so I’m attempting to not go to wild, thats what the backyard is for. 
I planted three dwarf palms - a Brahea moorei and two trunking Chamaedorea radicalis. 

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just got a Sable Miner in the mail from NortheastOhio Palms  so I will be planting it sometime next week

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Sabal Minor Blountstown Dwarf

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On 2/26/2024 at 9:23 AM, Chester B said:

Started on my front yard. These existing gardens will be “HOA friendly”. The landscaping in my neighborhood is bland at best so I’m attempting to not go to wild, thats what the backyard is for. 
I planted three dwarf palms - a Brahea moorei and two trunking Chamaedorea radicalis. 

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Would they let you grow a large palm in the front yard if you ask them nicely? 

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23 minutes ago, MarcusH said:

Would they let you grow a large palm in the front yard if you ask them nicely? 

So I read in the CCR guidelines a sentence that says something like this:

"Palms and yuccas are not suitable plants to the overall aesthetic of the neightborhood, and should be planted in the backyard not visible from the street"

Obviously some old POS who enjoys looking at all the little green blobs in everyone's front yard.  The vast majority of the plantings are Yaupon Holly and Boxwood. This person(s) obviously don't understand anything about horticulture and probably wants us all to have perfectly green lawns with nice lines in them from the lawnmower.  The landscaping in this neighborhood is a major snorefest.  If someone said something to me I would tell them to go F off.  My house, my plants.  

What's funny is they have a list of recommended plants which include Sabal mexicana and Red Yucca.  Also I guess none of these "experts" haven't bothered to look around at the native palms literally growing EVERYWHERE in our neighborhood.  Never mind all the palms throughout Houston, or the fact that perhaps Yuccas are native to Texas too.

The good news is that there are palms in people's front yards, mostly Trachycarpus and Chamaerops, so they aren't enforcing it, but really its a guideline, not a rule.  There is even a house near me with a 2 story dead Washy trunk in the front of the house.  Some peoples yards are in neglect, and I see all sorts of violations when I walk my dogs.  The older an HOA gets the more lenient they tend to be.

I had some issues at my last house with the HOA when I first moved in.  I ended up going to the meetings, became head of the Architectural review committee and sat on the Board of Directors as VP for years.  I influenced and changed the rules there, and am willing to do so here if needed.

Sorry long tirade, but when I read that sentence in the guidelines I was incensed.

Long story short, I don't plan on putting any large palms in my front yard.  Reason being is that it is tiny  and there are three decent size live oaks.  I'd have to remove them if I wanted a large palm, but I like them and they give a nice filtered light and help to cool my house.  My backyard is so huge, I have more than enough room to play around back there.  

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King palm and Blue Java banana. You can’t see the spray paint in the photo but these are in a new bed I’ve laid out against the house. 10x30 but will be curved. Next step is to create the edges and sheet mulch the grass. The remaining plants going in will all be of a small stature so as not to block the views from inside the house.  Primarily flowering subshrubs and some of the specialty colocasias. 
 

The king palm will be the only palm planted close to the house to try and give it protection in winter. It’s a little over 4 feet from the house and will easily clear the eaves, if it lasts that long!

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Edited by Chester B
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On 3/3/2024 at 10:04 AM, Chester B said:

So I read in the CCR guidelines a sentence that says something like this:

"Palms and yuccas are not suitable plants to the overall aesthetic of the neightborhood, and should be planted in the backyard not visible from the street"

Obviously some old POS who enjoys looking at all the little green blobs in everyone's front yard.  The vast majority of the plantings are Yaupon Holly and Boxwood. This person(s) obviously don't understand anything about horticulture and probably wants us all to have perfectly green lawns with nice lines in them from the lawnmower.  The landscaping in this neighborhood is a major snorefest.  If someone said something to me I would tell them to go F off.  My house, my plants.  

What's funny is they have a list of recommended plants which include Sabal mexicana and Red Yucca.  Also I guess none of these "experts" haven't bothered to look around at the native palms literally growing EVERYWHERE in our neighborhood.  Never mind all the palms throughout Houston, or the fact that perhaps Yuccas are native to Texas too.

The good news is that there are palms in people's front yards, mostly Trachycarpus and Chamaerops, so they aren't enforcing it, but really its a guideline, not a rule.  There is even a house near me with a 2 story dead Washy trunk in the front of the house.  Some peoples yards are in neglect, and I see all sorts of violations when I walk my dogs.  The older an HOA gets the more lenient they tend to be.

I had some issues at my last house with the HOA when I first moved in.  I ended up going to the meetings, became head of the Architectural review committee and sat on the Board of Directors as VP for years.  I influenced and changed the rules there, and am willing to do so here if needed.

Sorry long tirade, but when I read that sentence in the guidelines I was incensed.

Long story short, I don't plan on putting any large palms in my front yard.  Reason being is that it is tiny  and there are three decent size live oaks.  I'd have to remove them if I wanted a large palm, but I like them and they give a nice filtered light and help to cool my house.  My backyard is so huge, I have more than enough room to play around back there.  

Completely understandable! HOA can be a blessing and curse at the same time.  I assume your HOA isn't very strict about policies otherwise those dead palms would have been gone years ago . 

I also wouldn't think of removing oak trees they will provide you plenty of shade in the warmer month.  Creating shade is important in Texas to keep your house "cool" and lowers your electric bill.  

 

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47 minutes ago, Chester B said:

King palm and Blue Java banana. You can’t see the spray paint in the photo but these are in a new bed I’ve laid out against the house. 10x30 but will be curved. Next step is to create the edges and sheet mulch the grass. The remaining plants going in will all be of a small stature so as not to block the views from inside the house.  Primarily flowering subshrubs and some of the specialty colocasias. 
 

The king palm will be the only palm planted close to the house to try and give it protection in winter. It’s a little over 4 feet from the house and will easily clear the eaves, if it lasts that long!

IMG_9227.jpeg

IMG_9225.jpeg

IMG_9226.jpeg

Last year I tried to grow a Musa Basjoo. It didn't surivive unfortunately.  Got too much sunlight and it was planted too close to a wall which is facing south.  Literally cooked it.  You will be more lucky with the humidity, more rain and less hot summers compared to SA.  

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