Jump to content
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT ABOUT LOGGING IN ×
  • WELCOME GUEST

    It looks as if you are viewing PalmTalk as an unregistered Guest.

    Please consider registering so as to take better advantage of our vast knowledge base and friendly community.  By registering you will gain access to many features - among them are our powerful Search feature, the ability to Private Message other Users, and be able to post and/or answer questions from all over the world. It is completely free, no “catches,” and you will have complete control over how you wish to use this site.

    PalmTalk is sponsored by the International Palm Society. - an organization dedicated to learning everything about and enjoying palm trees (and their companion plants) while conserving endangered palm species and habitat worldwide. Please take the time to know us all better and register.

    guest Renda04.jpg

Need your help and ideas for planting Cocos Nucifera on Madeira Island (North)


IlyaIvanov

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone! I'm reaching out for your valuable help and ideas regarding the proper planting of Cocos Nucifera (coconut palm) in the northern region of Madeira Island. Your expertise and insights will be greatly appreciated. Please share any tips, recommendations, or experiences you may have. Thank you!

Hardiness Zone is 11b, more accurate climate data for this location: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/São_Vicente,_Madeira#Climate

CoconutLocation.JPG

streetviewImg (9).png

streetviewImg (10).png

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sao Vincente has some potential. We visited it past March but seemed without tropicals. Being on the Northern side I would choose location with most hours of sunshine. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks good from the images. The only thing I would suggest is making the area with dark rocks a lot larger. Since it's on the south facing side maybe you could make that an arid section besides the coconut palm. If you can use black volcanic sand as well as the rocks. On the canary islands this sand gets very hot.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/13/2024 at 12:24 PM, Foxpalms said:

Looks good from the images. The only thing I would suggest is making the area with dark rocks a lot larger. Since it's on the south facing side maybe you could make that an arid section besides the coconut palm. If you can use black volcanic sand as well as the rocks. On the canary islands this sand gets very hot.

Great idea, thanks for the suggestion! Sao Vicente beach has some black sand nearby! And some big rocks aswell

Edited by IlyaIvanov
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/12/2024 at 9:56 AM, dalmatiansoap said:

Sao Vincente has some potential. We visited it past March but seemed without tropicals. Being on the Northern side I would choose location with most hours of sunshine. 

They have no idea that they can grow so many tropicals there, even in the south coast, I mean just look at... Machico beach, no palm trees but they have Plane trees... Maybe they just don't care, idk.

 

What I know for sure is that, SV is very underrated in terms of warmth. For this January (1.1-13.1) it averages 22,63°C Max day temps, even slightly higher than Funchal's 22.26°C. Overall this year has been VERY warm, probably because of ongoing El Niño.

Edited by IlyaIvanov
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/12/2024 at 9:56 AM, dalmatiansoap said:

Sao Vincente has some potential. We visited it past March but seemed without tropicals. Being on the Northern side I would choose location with most hours of sunshine. 

I have been around Madeira, I've seen a lot of villages. And I have to say Sao Vicente has some of the best looking Palms / Plants. Because it's simply not blasted with 100 km/h winds like other coastal places on Madeira... And high amount of rainfall also helps :D My only concern is the nigh temps in Sao Vicente,  11°C compared to Funchal's 14°C. Otherwise it's a perfect place. Maybe if it's planted close to the house (like in the picture) the night temps will be slightly higher...

Edited by IlyaIvanov
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

View from our property, Neighbours Archontophoenix ....cunninghamiana?? Not sure :D But I like it!

A lot of work ahead...

Screenshot 2023-12-14 005122.jpg

Screenshot 2023-12-14 004334.jpg

Screenshot 2023-12-14 004652.jpg

Edited by IlyaIvanov
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow what a beautiful spot I’m sure it will look fantastic.
 

One thing I noticed that isn’t mentioned much here but is a big factor imo is that the thick rocks/stones that absorb heat in the summer. What I have noticed is in the winter when the suns angle is much less overhead the rocks don’t get a much direct rays (especially if there is the slightest thing blocking them) and they absorb the cold from the night and give off frigid temps way later into the day than if they weren’t there at all. 
 

For example I have a mango tree that I surrounded with bricks and now that it is winter it is the coldest spot in my yard and the maybe extra hour of warmth it gives off in the night does not makeup for the 4-5 hours of cold radiation it gives off in the early afternoon. 
 

So personally I will only have rocks in the summer months not the winter. I’m in San Diego our latitude and temps are almost the same 

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

10b/11a - San Diego

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I remember correctly there was a small palm nursery selling juvenile Arcontophoenix by the road few minutes drive from Ribeira Brava to SV. Unfortunately it was closed on our way back so we couldn't check what else they had. But for sure all Madeira doesn't care so much about palm trees as they could.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, SouthernCATropicals said:

Wow what a beautiful spot I’m sure it will look fantastic.
 

One thing I noticed that isn’t mentioned much here but is a big factor imo is that the thick rocks/stones that absorb heat in the summer. What I have noticed is in the winter when the suns angle is much less overhead the rocks don’t get a much direct rays (especially if there is the slightest thing blocking them) and they absorb the cold from the night and give off frigid temps way later into the day than if they weren’t there at all. 
 

For example I have a mango tree that I surrounded with bricks and now that it is winter it is the coldest spot in my yard and the maybe extra hour of warmth it gives off in the night does not makeup for the 4-5 hours of cold radiation it gives off in the early afternoon. 
 

So personally I will only have rocks in the summer months not the winter. I’m in San Diego our latitude and temps are almost the same 

Thanks!

Oh, good to know, thanks for the info! It looks like having just black sand will be enough then. I also plan on planting a Mango tree, as they're one of my favorite fruits! Yeah we are literally on the same latitude, and Mediterranean climate too!

Edited by IlyaIvanov
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, dalmatiansoap said:

If I remember correctly there was a small palm nursery selling juvenile Arcontophoenix by the road few minutes drive from Ribeira Brava to SV. Unfortunately it was closed on our way back so we couldn't check what else they had. But for sure all Madeira doesn't care so much about palm trees as they could.

That could be North Gardens, they have lots of different plants there, it's on the left, after the tunnel ends. But even there, their plant selection is half of what we have in a regular market in Czechia lol. It will be hard to find all the tropical plants I want in my garden, but we'll see... :D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/14/2024 at 3:37 PM, IlyaIvanov said:

They have no idea that they can grow so many tropicals there, even in the south coast, I mean just look at... Machico beach, no palm trees but they have Plane trees... Maybe they just don't care, idk.

 

What I know for sure is that, SV is very underrated in terms of warmth. For this January (1.1-13.1) it averages 22,63°C Max day temps, even slightly higher than Funchal's 22.26°C. Overall this year has been VERY warm, probably because of ongoing El Niño.

I think that's a European problem/thing. No matter where - potential isn't fully used ever. Even in the mildest spots around the Mediterranean Sea you often see them sticking with relatively cold hardy plants and always the same. It's incredible how much more is grown in the US in California for example, even up to San Francisco! Maybe you can inspire some people on Madeira. 😉 I love the idea of a Coconut! :greenthumb:

  • Like 4

Yes it's me Hortulanus 😂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reason North Coast has been warmer is due to the wind blowing from S or SW which benefits the northern coast, due to foehn effect and less clouds in the north, blocked by the the mountains.

 

Where are you going to find the coconut? Good luck with the experiment, looking forward to the test:)

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, Cluster said:

The reason North Coast has been warmer is due to the wind blowing from S or SW which benefits the northern coast, due to foehn effect and less clouds in the north, blocked by the the mountains.

 

Where are you going to find the coconut? Good luck with the experiment, looking forward to the test:)

Yes, I understand that. It won't always be like that,  but still nice that north can get warm like that sometimes.

We already planted a few Heliconias and one Plumeria. As for the Cocos unfortunately it's still an empty property. So I can't plant it near the house right now, but I still wanted to give an update, that things are moving forward. I haven't been in Madeira for a while now, but my parents did visit in November, I told them to take a quick look in Tabua (the location you recommended), they have found some small ones, but maybe they didn't check properly, there might be bigger one's, I didn't want to bother them haha. So we will have to wait until I visit the island again, I will try to check every place they might sell it, and will give an update about the situation.

But if you know something / or will find something, a place where they sell decent sized Cocos I will be very grateful! :)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/14/2024 at 9:37 AM, IlyaIvanov said:

What I know for sure is that, SV is very underrated in terms of warmth. For this January (1.1-13.1) it averages 22,63°C Max day temps, even slightly higher than Funchal's 22.26°C. Overall this year has been VERY warm, probably because of ongoing El Niño.

There's an Al Nino in the tropical Atlantic right now, as well as in the Mediterranean Sea, which is very warm this fall. The real El Nino in the Pacific is weakening and far away. 

The coldest months are above 15/60 F, which is a minimum for coconut palms, but as with the real Mediterranean climate type, all of the rainfall is in the winter, when it's cold, and those T mins being in the low 10s/50 F, colder than Funchal, that could be significant. 

As far as beneficial Foehn winds, despite being on the north side of the mountains with wind and rain patterns, rain seems to be high in all parts of Madeira for fall, winter and spring. More than a meter of rain. 
Try not to be too high in elevation, stay below 100 meters, Ponta Delgada city has nights 1 C warmer in the winter than rural Sao Vicente. 

At least it's warmer year round than Newport Beach on the California coast, where a coconut palm inexplicably lived for many years until it was abandoned. Pick whatever variety and subtype that tree was. 

Edited by Aceraceae
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/11/2024 at 11:32 PM, IlyaIvanov said:

Hello everyone! I'm reaching out for your valuable help and ideas regarding the proper planting of Cocos Nucifera (coconut palm) in the northern region of Madeira Island. Your expertise and insights will be greatly appreciated. Please share any tips, recommendations, or experiences you may have. Thank you!

Hardiness Zone is 11b, more accurate climate data for this location: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/São_Vicente,_Madeira#Climate

CoconutLocation.JPG

streetviewImg (9).png

streetviewImg (10).png

Good luck with your experiment, I'm sure it will grow. Set an example for your neighbors in Madeira and create a tropical garden. As is often pointed out here, Madeirans and Portuguese in general aren't very interested in palm trees and aren't really aware of their climate. But if they see that you have a nice garden full of beautiful tropical plants, they'll all want to do the same. The choice of palms is quite limited in rural areas, they are simply planting archontophoenix cunninghamiana, howea forsteriana, washingtonias or syagrus. Even in nurseries there's not much choice, unfortunately. 

 

On 1/16/2024 at 9:13 PM, Hortulanus said:

I think that's a European problem/thing. No matter where - potential isn't fully used ever. Even in the mildest spots around the Mediterranean Sea you often see them sticking with relatively cold hardy plants and always the same. It's incredible how much more is grown in the US in California for example, even up to San Francisco! Maybe you can inspire some people on Madeira. 😉 I love the idea of a Coconut! :greenthumb:

I think Portugal is one of the worst in this case and I'm not only talking about palm trees. On the other hand, Spain is completely the opposite and the most advanced country in Europe in terms of acknowledging their climate's potential. Even some regions in France, such as Menton, are more advanced in their choice of palms than Portugal. I've been to the Canary Islands which share a similar climate with Madeira (Northern Tenerife and La Palma especially) and the differences are abismal. Sure, almost every palm tree I see there can grow on Madeira island, but they're so rare... I'm sure Madeira would look more tropical if it were Spanish instead and coconut trees would be as common as any other palm tree. 

Edited by Pargomad
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Pargomad said:

Good luck with your experiment, I'm sure it will grow. Set an example for your neighbors in Madeira and create a tropical garden. As is often pointed out here, Madeirans and Portuguese in general aren't very interested in palm trees and aren't really aware of their climate. But if they see that you have a nice garden full of beautiful tropical plants, they'll all want to do the same. The choice of palms is quite limited in rural areas, they are simply planting archontophoenix cunninghamiana, howea forsteriana, washingtonias or syagrus. Even in nurseries there's not much choice, unfortunately. 

 

I think Portugal is one of the worst in this case and I'm not only talking about palm trees. On the other hand, Spain is completely the opposite and the most advanced country in Europe in terms of acknowledging their climate's potential. Even some regions in France, such as Menton, are more advanced in their choice of palms than Portugal. I've been to the Canary Islands which share a similar climate with Madeira (Northern Tenerife and La Palma especially) and the differences are abismal. Sure, almost every palm tree I see there can grow on Madeira island, but they're so rare... I'm sure Madeira would look more tropical if it were Spanish instead and coconut trees would be as common as any other palm tree. 

I also noticed that. Portugal also has some benefits from not being too hot and dry most of the times, especially along the coast. But even in higher latitudes with relatively mild winter climates the pontential is not fully used. Not enough palms and IF then they stick to 2-3 species. There are also many many exotic beautiful trees and shrubs that could be grown in western European climates in USDA zones 8 to 10. It always feels like people like to go with what they already know. But as I've seen here on this forum "plant racism" 😂 is also a thing even in the north western US and south western Canada. Palms become more common but people complain about them "not belonging here". Which is very ignorant to me. Most palms/plants the Mediterranean is known for are not native there either and for example here in my area most of the commonly planted species are Asian and were introduced only decades ago. I hope this will change...

  • Like 3

Yes it's me Hortulanus 😂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've also noticed this kind of racism here in Portugal. Many people hate palms and other exotic trees from warmer climates. According to them, they don't belong here because they're not part of the country's vegetation. On social media, this hatred is even more prevalent. They want to plant only trees native to the country (not even necessarily to the region). Palm trees have always been present in the country. We have a native palm (chamaerops humilis) and palms (mainly date palms) have been cultivated as ornamentals for centuries, probably since the Muslim period. Another tree introduced by the Muslims is the orange tree, but strangely enough, this one is accepted and perceived as "Portuguese", whereas the date palm introduced at the same time is perceived as “foreign”. As a result, in recent years, it has become popular to plant “Portuguese” trees in gardens, so you'll find gardens with quercus robur (native to the north of the country) in Lisbon, for example, alongside subtropical and tropical ficus planted over twenty years ago, when it was popular to plant subtropical and tropical trees.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Same everywhere, here is the same situation. Most people force "native" plantings, what's totally crazy specially when talking about non ornamental trees and veggies. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Pargomad said:

I've also noticed this kind of racism here in Portugal. Many people hate palms and other exotic trees from warmer climates. According to them, they don't belong here because they're not part of the country's vegetation. On social media, this hatred is even more prevalent. They want to plant only trees native to the country (not even necessarily to the region). Palm trees have always been present in the country. We have a native palm (chamaerops humilis) and palms (mainly date palms) have been cultivated as ornamentals for centuries, probably since the Muslim period. Another tree introduced by the Muslims is the orange tree, but strangely enough, this one is accepted and perceived as "Portuguese", whereas the date palm introduced at the same time is perceived as “foreign”. As a result, in recent years, it has become popular to plant “Portuguese” trees in gardens, so you'll find gardens with quercus robur (native to the north of the country) in Lisbon, for example, alongside subtropical and tropical ficus planted over twenty years ago, when it was popular to plant subtropical and tropical trees.

What about native Eucalyptus forests in Portugal? 😂😂 Yup it's the same thing... Especially in cities (or just populated areas) planting "traditional" plants is stupid because you're not helping the ecosystems or the environment. We also get very very dry summers nowadays and "native" trees constantly die during the summers and then they get replaced with the same species and the trees don't even establish before they are also dead the next summer... But the best thing about this is that those are not native either. They just have been cultivated much longer here. And I also totally feel this fruit tree issue. In modern planting styles everybody wants to support native plants and ornamental ones aren't good but fruit, veggie and herb growing is encouraged. Guess what? Most of those plants ARE NOT NATIVE HERE! 🤷‍♂️ 2000 years ago when the romans came to my area it was just forests with about 1 or 2 native major tree species. I could rage on this for hours... 😂 Oh and another thing to add is that palm trees are actually very good choices in populated areas as they tick all the boxes - they are ornamental, they usually don't need to get watered, they usually don't expand much sideways once they are trunking, they often don't need as much pruning and attention as other plants and birds can nest in most of them. During storms they don't fall on people or cars and so on...

  • Like 3

Yes it's me Hortulanus 😂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Pargomad said:

Good luck with your experiment, I'm sure it will grow. Set an example for your neighbors in Madeira and create a tropical garden. As is often pointed out here, Madeirans and Portuguese in general aren't very interested in palm trees and aren't really aware of their climate. But if they see that you have a nice garden full of beautiful tropical plants, they'll all want to do the same. The choice of palms is quite limited in rural areas, they are simply planting archontophoenix cunninghamiana, howea forsteriana, washingtonias or syagrus. Even in nurseries there's not much choice, unfortunately. 

 

I think Portugal is one of the worst in this case and I'm not only talking about palm trees. On the other hand, Spain is completely the opposite and the most advanced country in Europe in terms of acknowledging their climate's potential. Even some regions in France, such as Menton, are more advanced in their choice of palms than Portugal. I've been to the Canary Islands which share a similar climate with Madeira (Northern Tenerife and La Palma especially) and the differences are abismal. Sure, almost every palm tree I see there can grow on Madeira island, but they're so rare... I'm sure Madeira would look more tropical if it were Spanish instead and coconut trees would be as common as any other palm tree. 

I am not joking when I say my zone 6b/7a garden (it gets down to -20°C sometimes) in Central Europe looks often more tropical than most gardens that I've seen on Madeira, especially in the north. Here are some pics from the summer. It's not guaranteed that everything will survive this cold winter, but most of it will. All I use for protection is basically a lot of mulch and cloth. I also recently planted a cold hardy eucalyptus (E.Gunnii "azura") that should survive down to -20°C. Now image if I zone-pushed like that in Madeira...

IMG_0976.HEIC IMG_0962.HEIC IMG_0967.HEIC IMG_0986.HEIC IMG_0951.HEIC IMG_9080.HEIC IMG_9165.HEIC IMG_0181.HEIC

Edited by IlyaIvanov
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/20/2024 at 3:40 PM, Hortulanus said:

What about native Eucalyptus forests in Portugal? 😂😂 Yup it's the same thing... Especially in cities (or just populated areas) planting "traditional" plants is stupid because you're not helping the ecosystems or the environment. We also get very very dry summers nowadays and "native" trees constantly die during the summers and then they get replaced with the same species and the trees don't even establish before they are also dead the next summer... But the best thing about this is that those are not native either. They just have been cultivated much longer here. And I also totally feel this fruit tree issue. In modern planting styles everybody wants to support native plants and ornamental ones aren't good but fruit, veggie and herb growing is encouraged. Guess what? Most of those plants ARE NOT NATIVE HERE! 🤷‍♂️ 2000 years ago when the romans came to my area it was just forests with about 1 or 2 native major tree species. I could rage on this for hours... 😂 Oh and another thing to add is that palm trees are actually very good choices in populated areas as they tick all the boxes - they are ornamental, they usually don't need to get watered, they usually don't expand much sideways once they are trunking, they often don't need as much pruning and attention as other plants and birds can nest in most of them. During storms they don't fall on people or cars and so on...

Today I posted some photos of Madeira's coconut trees on a forum about the island and I received a lot of hate in the comments: "Why would we want to look like Hawaii", "Coconut trees aren't native", "stop bringing exotic species to our beautiful island", "we are fully aware of our climate's potential", "Palm trees aren't indigenous, they don't belong here", "could we just stick to what we already plant here", "LOL Madeirans are known for being the best gardeners", "I prefer cypresses and pine trees, palm trees are just an aberration here", "let's preserve our island please".. "I don't want to cover the island with coconut trees to please some tourists" and so on.  I get the same kind of comments when I talk about palm trees in mainland Portugal. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/20/2024 at 3:46 PM, IlyaIvanov said:

I am not joking when I say my zone 6b/7a garden (it gets down to -20°C sometimes) in Central Europe looks often more tropical than most gardens that I've seen on Madeira, especially in the north. Here are some pics from the summer. It's not guaranteed that everything will survive this cold winter, but most of it will. All I use for protection is basically a lot of mulch and cloth. I also recently planted a cold hardy eucalyptus (E.Gunnii "azura") that should survive down to -20°C. Now image if I zone-pushed like that in Madeira...

IMG_0976.HEIC 3.1 MB · 4 downloads IMG_0962.HEIC 1.53 MB · 3 downloads IMG_0967.HEIC 2.08 MB · 2 downloads IMG_0986.HEIC 3.65 MB · 2 downloads IMG_0951.HEIC 2.51 MB · 2 downloads IMG_9080.HEIC 3.27 MB · 1 download IMG_9165.HEIC 3.07 MB · 2 downloads IMG_0181.HEIC 3.78 MB · 3 downloads

Nice job! I'm impressed. Regarding Madeira, there are subtropical and tropical gardens on Madeira, specially at sea level in urban areas like Funchal. In rural areas, people tend to just stick to fruit trees or flowers.  Of course, there's potential for a lot of tropical species there, the problem is that they just stick to the same few species they already know. They always sell the same species in their garden centers so...

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Pargomad said:

Today I posted some photos of Madeira's coconut trees on a forum about the island and I received a lot of hate in the comments: "Why would we want to look like Hawaii", "Coconut trees aren't native", "stop bringing exotic species to our beautiful island", "we are fully aware of our climate's potential", "Palm trees aren't indigenous, they don't belong here", "could we just stick to what we already plant here", "LOL Madeirans are known for being the best gardeners", "I prefer cypresses and pine trees, palm trees are just an aberration here", "let's preserve our island please".. "I don't want to cover the island with coconut trees to please some tourists" and so on.  I get the same kind of comments when I talk about palm trees in mainland Portugal. 

Oh man... I hope this changes. I mean also it isn't like you have to turn over the whole landscape completely LOL. Just some more variation at least in populated areas. That's what I mean. Of course you wouldn't try to harm natural places but in areas where people live there is no true nature anyway and anything there is cultivated and artificial. Idk about Madeira but here in mainland Europe there are barely any natural areas left. Most forests are also man made often with non native species... Landscaping is different from nature preservation.

  • Like 2

Yes it's me Hortulanus 😂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/22/2024 at 12:59 AM, Hortulanus said:

Oh man... I hope this changes. I mean also it isn't like you have to turn over the whole landscape completely LOL. Just some more variation at least in populated areas. That's what I mean. Of course you wouldn't try to harm natural places but in areas where people live there is no true nature anyway and anything there is cultivated and artificial. Idk about Madeira but here in mainland Europe there are barely any natural areas left. Most forests are also man made often with non native species... Landscaping is different from nature preservation.

People usually have no idea what they are talking about. I just had a huge fight with a woman who lives on the island that literally said pinetrees were native to the island and that palm trees and exotic trees have nothing to do there. I explained everything to her and she insulted me anyway 😅

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, Pargomad said:

People usually have no idea what they are talking about. I just had a huge fight with a woman who lives on the island that literally said pinetrees were native to the island and that palm trees and exotic trees have nothing to do there. I explained everything to her and she insulted me anyway 😅

Annoying but let's stay positive in this thread and support the idea of the Coconut! 🙏:greenthumb:

  • Like 2

Yes it's me Hortulanus 😂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Portuguese need to take note of the plants the British planted on Bermuda, which is full of tropicals also at 32N.

Screenshot_20240123-234032543 (1).jpg

Edited by Foxpalms
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Foxpalms said:

The Portuguese need to take note of the plants the British planted on Bermuda, which is full of tropicals also at 32N.

Screenshot_20240123-234032543 (1).jpg

Funny I also thought about Bermuda. They have a cool tropical climate similar to Madeira.

  • Like 1

Yes it's me Hortulanus 😂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Foxpalms said:

The Portuguese need to take note of the plants the British planted on Bermuda, which is full of tropicals also at 32N.

Screenshot_20240123-234032543 (1).jpg

Madeira's ornamental flora has always been an extension of Portugal's arboreal traditions since the earliest settlements. At the same time, Madeira has also been a place of experimentation and acclimatization of exotic plants, mainly thanks to the British families who brought plants from Australia, South Africa and the Americas. 
In the early years of Portuguese colonization, settlers burned kilometers of native forest to establish fields of vines, wheat, sugar cane and later bananas. The first trees brought to the island came directly from Portugal: chestnut or hazelnut trees, maritime pine and others. 
At the same time, as Madeira was on the sea routes to America, Africa and Asia, plants from exotic lands began to be brought to the island. Later, botanists attracted by the "eternal spring" climate and families interested in botany brought subtropical and tropical plants to acclimatize them on the island. 
So there have always been two arboristic traditions: trees in vogue in Portugal were imported because they were cheaper and more accessible: plane trees, poplars, pines, olive trees, cypresses were used as ornamentals (some even in reforestation). From the 20th century onwards, fast-growing trees were planted to reforest the island: eucalyptus, acacia, pine, fir, etc. Meanwhile, subtropical and tropical plants were only planted in botanical gardens and parks. It was only in the 20th century that the use of exotic plants spread outside these contexts. Over time, subtropical and tropical plants gained ground against traditional Portuguese vegetation (Mediterranean/Atlantic climate). That's why in Funchal, for example, you can see trees that grow in Hawaii, Cuba or Miami alongside cypresses, olive and plane trees. The trend today is towards the use of subtropical and tropical plants. Nevertheless, plane trees, cypresses, olive trees and other trees from Mediterranean and temperate climates are still being planted at low altitudes. 

Edited by Pargomad
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...